Topic - Mark D. Obenshain

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  • Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.), left, introduces President Bill Clinton and Virginia gubernatorial candidate for Governor Terry McAuliffe, right, at Herndon Middle School, Herdon, Va., Monday, October 28, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

    EDITORIAL: A Republican winner for '14

    Sometimes today's loser is tomorrow's winner. Virginia state Sen. Mark D. Obenshain conceded last week that a conveniently discovered ballot box had given his Democratic opponent a slim edge in the recount for attorney general. As a conservative Republican who performed better than the rest of his party on Election Day, Mr. Obenshain might give serious thought to filing against Sen. Mark R. Warner, a Democrat, who must defend his U.S. Senate seat next November.

  • Mark D. Obenshain

    Obenshain to concede Virginia AG race

    Republican Mark D. Obenshain has scheduled a 3 p.m. press conference in Richmond in which he will concede the Virginia attorney general's race as preliminary recount results suggest he is falling farther behind.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOGRAPHS
Virginia State Sen. Mark Obenshain gestures as his wife Suzanne looks on during a news conference at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2013. Obenshain conceded the race for Attorney General to Democrat Mark Herring after a recount showed his losing ground in votes. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

    Obenshain concedes Virginia AG race to Herring, ending recount

    Republican Mark D. Obenshain on Wednesday conceded the Virginia attorney general's race to Democrat Mark R. Herring, putting an end to one of the closet elections in the state's history.

  • Illustration by Greg Groesch

    EDITORIAL: The art of stealing elections

    Stealing elections is an old game politicians play. Lyndon B. Johnson, the 36th president, got to the U.S. Senate in 1948 by "winning" the closest race in Texas history by a margin of 87 votes out of more than a million cast. An election judge in tiny Alice, Texas, said he counted more than 200 names on the voting roll for Box 13 that were written in alphabetic succession in the same hand, same color of ink. When a federal court subpoenaed Box 13, it was discovered to be "lost." LBJ took his seat in the Senate. Voting machines were supposed to put an end to such election-night chicanery, but Earl Long, the colorful governor of Louisiana, where fraud is the national sport, boasted that "I can make a voting machine play 'Home on the Range' all night long."

  • Mark R. Herring

    Obenshain raises ballot security issue in Va.

    Virginia's largest voting jurisdiction is set to begin a recount Monday for the tightest race in state history, even as one candidate raises concerns about the conduct of the election.

  • Obenshain

    Obenshain files petition for recount in Virginia attorney general's race

    Republican Mark D. Obenshain on Wednesday filed a petition asking for a recount of the results in this month's attorney general's race — a contest separated by just 165 votes.

  • FILE - In this Nov. 13, 2013 file photo, State Sen. Mark Obenshain, R-Harrisonburg, Republican candidate for Attorney General,  gestures during a new conference at the Capitol Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013, in Richmond, Va.  The closest statewide race in modern Virginia political history is unlikely to end Monday, Nov. 25,  when the State Board of Elections certifies the votes for attorney general and other contests in the Nov. 5 election. The State Board of Elections puts Democrat Mark Herring with a 165-vote edge over Obenshain out 2.2 million ballots cast for attorney general. While he hasn’t said so, Obenshain has signaled he will seek a recount, and he could press the issue to the General Assembly if he wants to take it to the limits of the law.  (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

    Obenshain to call for recount in Virginia attorney general's race

    Republican Mark D. Obenshain said Tuesday that he plans to formally ask for a recount of this month's Virginia attorney general's race that was decided by 165 votes.

  • Members of the State Board of Elections, Chairman Charles E. Judd, left, and secretary Don Palmer, right, begin the process to certify the Nov. 5 ballot for the race for Virginia attorney general at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Monday, Nov. 25, 2013.  Democrat Mark Herring leads Republican Mark Obenshain by 165 votes.   (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

    State certifies Herring as winner in Virginia attorney general's race

    The Virginia State Board of Elections on Monday declared Democrat Mark R. Herring the official winner of the state's attorney general race by 165 votes — the smallest margin for any statewide race in Virginia history.

  • State Sen. Mark Obenshain, R-Harrisonburg, Republican candidate for Attorney General,  gestures during a new conference at the Capitol Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013, in Richmond, Va.  Trailing by 164 votes, Obenshain announced his transition team, hours after Democrat candidate Mark Herring announced his own transition team.  The state's Board of Elections won't certify Virginia's voting until Nov. 25. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

    Virginia's attorney general race could end up in General Assembly

    A razor-thin margin in the Virginia attorney general's race could ultimately put the decision about a winner before the General Assembly — but the rarely used strategy of contesting an election comes with its own political consequences, analysts say.

  • Republican attorney general candidate Mark R. Obenshain announces his transition team Wednesday, hours after Democratic candidate Mark R. Herring announces his own as both teams await official certification Nov. 25. (associated press)

    Arlington bar codes examined for vote problems in Virginia

    Elections officials in Arlington acknowledged Wednesday that the county's electoral board accepted more than a dozen provisional ballots in which a voter's name had been checked off mistakenly as already having voted, a discrepancy apparently chalked up to errors by poll workers.

  • Democratic Va. Attorney General candidate Mark Herring speaks with reporters about the vote count in his election during an election night party in Tysons Corner, Va., Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen) (associated press photographs)

    Democrat Herring declares victory in Virginia attorney general race

    Democrat Mark R. Herring declared victory in the Virginia attorney general's race Tuesday, after opening a triple-digit lead in the final hours before localities certified their results and submitted them to the State Board of Elections.

  • FILE  - This Wednesday June 12, 2013 file photo shows Democratic candidate for Attorney General, State  Sen. Mark Herring, center, gesturing as Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Terry McAuliffe, left, and  Lt. Governor candidate, State Sen. Ralph Notrham, right, look on during a breakfast appearance in Richmond, Va. Herring faces State Sen. Mark Obenshain in the election on Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013.   (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

    Herring extends lead in Virginia AG race

    Democrat Mark R. Herring extended his lead over Republican Mark D. Obenshain in the Virginia attorney general's race Tuesday, after Fairfax County elections officials tallied their outstanding provisional ballots.

  • Attorney General candidate Mark Obenshain speaks to the crowd at the Lynchburg Regional Airport on Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013. (AP Photo/The News & Advance, Sam O'Keefe)

    Obenshain's attorney general lead cut to 55

    The race for attorney general in Virginia remains undecided nearly a week after Election Day, and as local elections officials neared the conclusion of an investigation into absentee ballots, the razor-thin lead of Republican Mark D. Obenshain narrowed.

  • Virginia state Sen. Mark R. Herring, the Democratic candidate for attorney general of the commonwealth, speaks with reporters about the vote count during a election-night party in Tysons Corner, Va., early on Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

    Democrat Mark Herring gains in cliffhanging Va. attorney general race

    FAIRFAX, Va. (AP) — The cliffhanging race for Virginia attorney general tightened Saturday after a canvass of absentee ballots in a Fairfax County district added 2,070 votes for Democrat Mark R. Herring, more than doubling those added to Republican Mark D. Obenshain's total.

  • Obenshain

    Virginia's last Republican standing: Mark Obenshain hopes to survive recount

    The long road to a possible victory in the race for Virginia's attorney general began when Mark D. Obenshain was a teenager.

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