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In a Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013, photo, an overweight U.S. Navy sailor voluntarily participating in the U.S. Marines' body composition program struggles doing sit-ups during a workout at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego. Some service members have complained that the Defense Department's method of estimating body fat, known as the "tape test," weeds out not just flabby physiques but bulkier, muscular builds. Fitness experts agree, saying the Pentagon's weight tables are outdated and do not reflect that Americans are now bigger, though not necessarily less healthy. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi) **FILE**
Photo by: Lenny Ignelzi
In a Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013, photo, an overweight U.S. Navy sailor voluntarily participating in the U.S. Marines' body composition program struggles doing sit-ups during a workout at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego. Some service members have complained that the Defense Department's method of estimating body fat, known as the "tape test," weeds out not just flabby physiques but bulkier, muscular builds. Fitness experts agree, saying the Pentagon's weight tables are outdated and do not reflect that Americans are now bigger, though not necessarily less healthy. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi) **FILE**

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