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FILE - This May 17, 2000 file photo shows Sue, the largest and most complete Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton ever found, on public display at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. company. Turns out The Field Museum's T. rex Sue didn't use those tiny arms very much. At least that's the initial conclusion from a detailed scan of the fossil's right forelimb at the Argonne National Laboratory. Researchers there used a scan to generate a 3-D image of the arm bones down to the cellular level. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)

FILE - This May 17, 2000 file photo shows Sue, the largest and most complete Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton ever found, on public display at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. company. Turns out The Field Museum's T. rex Sue didn't use those tiny arms very much. At least that's the initial conclusion from a detailed scan of the fossil's right forelimb at the Argonne National Laboratory. Researchers there used a scan to generate a 3-D image of the arm bones down to the cellular level. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)

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