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U.S.-Russia Crosstalk

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Illustration on U.S. Russian relations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sam Nunn and nuclear war

I had some dealings with Sam Nunn several decades ago, when he was Sen. Sam Nunn of Georgia. Growing up in Savannah, I applied to be a cadet at the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1981. Consequently, I had to drive multiple times by myself to be interviewed by Mr. Nunn's staff in Atlanta for consideration for a USAFA appointment, which in the end was a successful quest.

President Donald Trump, right, shakes hands with Russian President Vladimir Putin during a bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, Friday, June 28, 2019. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Mr. President: Send Sam Nunn to Moscow

Nowadays it is hard for anyone much under the age of 50 to imagine, but once upon a time the threat of nuclear war and the prospect of planetary extinction were things people actually worried about.

Is it about Western values or geopolitics?

When it comes to U.S. foreign policy, what we frequently hear from politicians and mainstream media is that it must be based on the well-known foundations of Western values, such as freedom, democracy, defense of human rights, and the supremacy of the rule of law.

President Donald Trump speaks as he meets with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg in the Oval Office of the White House, Tuesday, April 2, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Realpolitik or democracy now?

Things happen in cycles. Society shifts from conservative to socialist, from freedom to totalitarianism, from faithful to secular. We are experiencing a similar shift now -- from attempting to impose democracy in the world where we had no business doing so, to rationalizing our ability to impact events globally, and applying our limited resources as effectively as we can.

In this file photo taken on Monday, July 16, 2018, U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin shake hands at the beginning of a meeting at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, Finland.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File) **FILE**

Russia's role in American politics

It looks like President Trump has a chance to demonstrate the foreign policy pragmatism he campaigned on and was elected for in 2016 at this month's Group of 20 summit in Osaka, Japan.

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko gestures while answering to a journalist's question ahead of the presidential elections on April 21, at the Olympic stadium in Kiev, Ukraine, Sunday, April 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

Ukrainian elections: Why should Americans care?

Back in 2002, when President George W. Bush was mulling his attack on Iraq, Secretary of State Colin Powell reportedly cautioned him with what came to be known as the Pottery Barn Rule: "You break it, you own it."

In this Jan. 30, 2019, photo, Secretary of State Michael Pompeo at the State Department in Washington. The Trump administration is expected to announce as soon as Friday that it is withdrawing from a treaty that has been a centerpiece of superpower arms control since the Cold War and whose demise some analysts worry could fuel a new arms race. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Is democracy the answer to the world's problems?

According to President Trump's enemies, the list of his high crimes and misdemeanors, as well as his domestic and foreign policy failures, is so overwhelming that it would be almost impossible to add something substantial to it.

Russia doesn't want peace; Russia wants power

Let's start out by discussing some plain truths. First of all, the United States pulling out of the INF treaty, to protect its right to do exactly what Russia has done, is not a threat to world peace. Second, no one is threatening Russia.

Deputy Director of the Department for Non-Proliferation and Arms Control of the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs Oleg Rozhkov attends a panel discussion after a Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) conference in Beijing, China, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019. The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) conference in Beijing of the UN Security Council consists of five permanent members (P5) China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. (Thomas Peter/Pool Photo via AP)

Are we sleepwalking into nuclear disaster?

If anyone needed proof that former Sen. Sam Nunn, Georgia Democrat, and former Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz were right when they recently wrote in Politico that the U.S. and Russia are sleepwalking toward nuclear disaster, it came last week during Vladimir Putin's annual address to the Russian parliament.

The Syrian Chimera (Illustration by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times)

The truth is, Russia is expanding

I have written before that I don't believe Russia is the No. 1 threat to American security. On the contrary, a rising China is much more bent on confronting America militarily in the South China Sea or elsewhere, and Iran is bent on developing nuclear weapons to use irresponsibly.

Trump Influence of Putin Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

At midterm, mixed results of Trump's foreign policy

Of all Donald Trump's bucking of the bipartisan consensus in 2016, none struck terror into swamp spines more than his pledge to dump the globalists' endless wars and pointless commitments in favor of putting America first.

In this photo taken on Tuesday, Oct. 29, 1991, U.S. President George H. Bush, left, and Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev sit together at the Soviet Embassy after meeting in Madrid, Spain. Former Soviet premier Mikhail Gorbachev expressed his "deep condolences" Saturday Dec. 1, 2018, to the family of former U.S President George Bush and all Americans following his death, age 94. (AP Photo/Liu Heung Shing, File)

Is this what George H.W. Bush envisioned?

As the nation laid to rest President George H.W. Bush, little attention was given to what perhaps were his most perceptive observations.

In this Nov. 9, 2017, photo, U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping participate in a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China. Mr. Xi had an "extremely positive" phone conversation with Mr. Trump about trade and other issues, the foreign ministry said Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. The two leaders agreed to "strengthen economic exchanges," said a ministry spokesman, Lu Kang. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Trump is confronting China

There are some truths that I strive to preach, for lack of a better word, in today's information-culture wars propagated in our corrupt mainstream media. Here are a few: Nationalism is not racism, adherence to principles is not hate, masculinity is not toxic and there are only two sexes.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before departing for France on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, Nov. 9, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

US-Russia-China Big Three - or WW III?

An expected meeting this weekend between President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin at a Paris commemoration of the end of World War I has been thrown into doubt, though a sideline encounter may still take place. A more substantive discussion between the men who control the world's biggest nuclear arsenals is expected at the G20 Buenos Aires summit later this month, when Mr. Trump will also meet with China's President Xi Jinping.