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Ben Wolfgang

Ben Wolfgang

Ben Wolfgang covers the Pentagon, military and foreign affairs for The Washington Times.

Previously, he covered energy and the environment, Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign in 2016, and also spent two years as a White House correspondent during the Obama administration.

Before coming to The Times in 2011, Ben worked as political reporter at The Republican-Herald in Pottsville, Pa.

He can be reached at [email protected].

Articles by Ben Wolfgang

U.S., Taliban reach deal for 7-day reduction in violence

The U.S. appears on the verge of finally securing a peace agreement in Afghanistan, top Trump administration officials said Thursday, as they announced a short-term pact with the Taliban that calls for a seven-day reduction in violence across the country to clear the way for intensive direct talks. Published February 13, 2020

The latest violence in Idlib, Syria, came as government forces came closer to capturing the last rebel-held part of a strategic highway linking southern and northern Syria, which would bring the road under Syrian President Bashar Assad's full control for the first time since 2012. (ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOGRAPHS)

Turkey, Syria edge closer to all-out war in disputed Idlib province

Turkey and Syria moved closer to all-out war Tuesday in Syria's Idlib province, as carefully crafted international cease-fire agreements crumbled and heavy fighting between the two regional foes sparked a massive humanitarian crisis. Published February 11, 2020

The Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Tuscon (SSN 770) transits the East Sea while leading a 13-ship formation. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Adam K. Thomas/Released)

Red alert, Russia: Pentagon arms Navy submarines with tactical nuclear weapons

The Pentagon on this week announced the deployment of its first new nuclear weapon in decades and in the process issued a clear warning to Moscow, a move critics say represents a return to Cold War-era brinkmanship that makes the prospect of a deadly nuclear miscalculation far more likely. Published February 8, 2020

In this Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2013, photo illustration, hands type on a computer keyboard in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

Defense industry 'report card' finds that U.S. lags on cybersecurity

The vaunted American military-industrial machine is in decline and is quickly losing ground to China, defense leaders said Wednesday in a stunning new self-examination that lays out a host of shortcomings and warns of major ramifications for U.S. national security. Published February 5, 2020

The presence of low-yield nuclear weapons won't have any major impact on the Navy's fundamental strategy at sea, military officials say. (Associated Press/File)

Cold War-era brinkmanship erupts as Pentagon deploys new nuclear weapon

The Pentagon on Tuesday announced the deployment of its first new nuclear weapon in decades and in the process issued a clear warning to Moscow, a move critics say represents a return to Cold War-era brinkmanship that makes the prospect of a deadly nuclear miscalculation far more likely. Published February 4, 2020

In this Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, file photo, Afghan security personnel gather at the site of a car bomb attack in Kabul, Afghanistan.  (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul, File) **FILE**

EXCLUSIVE: Pakistan sees Taliban talks as only way to find peace in Afghanistan

NEWSMAKER INTERVIEW: America has exhausted all of its military options in Afghanistan and is left with little choice but to forge ahead in peace talks with the Taliban, Pakistani Ambassador to the U.S. Asad M. Khan said Monday, underscoring the high stakes of grueling negotiations. Published February 3, 2020

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo holds a joint news conference with Kazakh Foreign Minister Mukhtar Tleuberdi at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan, Sunday, Feb. 2, 2020. (Kevin Lamarque/Pool Photo via AP)

Mike Pompeo urges countries to do business with U.S., not China

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Sunday warned nations against doing business with Chinese companies, laying out a series of concerns -- from a lack of transparency to weak environmental protections -- that come along with any deals with Beijing. Published February 2, 2020

In this photo taken Feb. 24, 2018 and released by the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Vance Goodfellow, left, 475th Expeditionary Air Base Squadron (EABS) commander, and U.S. Army Lt. Col. Todd Martin, safety officer assigned to the Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) Safety directorate, look at trees that are being cleared during a battlefield circulation site visit at Camp Simba, Manda Bay, Kenya. The al-Shabab extremist group said Sunday, Jan. 5, 2020 that it has attacked the Camp Simba military base used by U.S. and Kenyan troops in coastal Kenya, while Kenya's military says the attempted pre-dawn breach was repulsed and at least four attackers were killed. (Staff Sgt. Timothy Moore/U.S. Air Force via AP)

Pentagon's push to reduce U.S. troops in Africa met by surge in terror attacks

The Pentagon is facing a firestorm of opposition to plans to cut troop levels in Africa. Regional analysts and military insiders from Capitol Hill to the capitals of Europe are warning that any reductions could fuel a resurgent terrorist goal of making mincemeat out of the continent. Published January 29, 2020