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Ben Wolfgang

Ben Wolfgang

Ben Wolfgang covers the Pentagon, military and foreign affairs for The Washington Times.

Previously, he covered energy and the environment, Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign in 2016, and also spent two years as a White House correspondent during the Obama administration.

Before coming to The Times in 2011, Ben worked as political reporter at The Republican-Herald in Pottsville, Pa.

He can be reached at [email protected]shingtontimes.com.

Articles by Ben Wolfgang

In this Jan. 25, 2020, file photo a Boeing 777X airplane takes off on its first flight with the Olympic Mountains in the background at Paine Field in Everett, Wash. Boeing Co. reports financial results on Wednesday, Jan. 29. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)  **FILE**

Defense industry braces for unknown fallout from virus

The vaunted U.S. military-industrial machine is venturing into the unknown as the coronavirus continues its spread across the country, sector leaders said Wednesday, with the global pandemic threatening to slow down innovation and disrupt key supply chains. Published March 18, 2020

Defense Secretary Mark Esper said his department is prepared to make available respiratory masks and military ventilators to treat patients. (Associated Press)

Pentagon willing but wary over role in U.S. coronavirus fight

President Trump is facing increased pressure to enlist the military in America's battle against the coronavirus, but Pentagon officials are warning against the idea that the armed forces can provide the ultimate answer and law scholars say complex legal questions could await the commander in chief if he pursues such a strategy to its fullest. Published March 17, 2020

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani speaks during a news conference at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sunday, March, 1, 2020. Ghani said Sunday he won't be releasing the 5,000 prisoners the Taliban say must be freed before intra-Afghan negotiations can begin. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

Lawmakers blast Afghanistan peace deal over lack of enforcement

As many questions as answers surround the Trump administration's landmark peace deal with the Taliban. As the dust settled Sunday, critics from Capitol Hill to Kabul began poking holes in the four-page document designed to be America's exit plan from its longest war in history. Published March 1, 2020

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during the agreement signing between Taliban and U.S. officials in Doha, Qatar, Saturday, Feb. 29, 2020. The United States is poised to sign a peace agreement with Taliban militants on Saturday aimed at bringing an end to 18 years of bloodshed in Afghanistan and allowing U.S. troops to return home from America's longest war. (AP Photo/Hussein Sayed)

U.S., Taliban agree to troop withdrawal within 14 months

The U.S. on Saturday signed a landmark peace agreement with its foe of nearly two decades, the Taliban, as the Trump administration officially embarked down a path that could see all American troops exit Afghanistan within 14 months and represent the beginning of the end for the longest war in U.S. history. Published February 29, 2020

In this Feb. 17, 2020, file photo, Democratic presidential candidate and former South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks at The Union Event Center in Salt Lake City. Democratic presidential candidates like to boast about their ability to lure away disaffected Republican voters. If there's a place to test their skills, it's Utah. The deep red state is a bastion of conservative resistance to President Donald Trump. (Spenser Heaps/The Deseret News via AP, File)

Buttigieg 'extremely vulnerable' to attack for relying on Navy service

A seven-month deployment in Afghanistan shrouded in secrecy is a key piece of Pete Buttigieg's pitch to voters in the 2020 presidential race, with the former South Bend, Indiana, mayor arguing that his status as a veteran and his time in a war zone give him foreign policy gravitas and first-hand military experience none of his Democratic primary rivals can claim. Published February 29, 2020

Navy secretary nominee stonewalled over politics, former Pentagon spokesman says

President Trump's Navy secretary pick seems to be slowly sinking. The president tapped U.S. Ambassador to Norway Kenneth Braithwaite, a retired admiral and former naval aviator, for the post three months ago, but key lawmakers on Capitol Hill told The Washington Times that they have yet to hold customary one-on-one meetings with the nominee and confirmed that the White House hasn't sent the formal paperwork to move the nomination forward. Published February 26, 2020

Democratic presidential candidate former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, poses for a photo after a Democratic presidential primary debate at the Gaillard Center, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020, in Charleston, S.C., co-hosted by CBS News and the Congressional Black Caucus Institute. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

'Swift Boat' sequel? Military pitch threatens to backfire on Buttigieg

A seven-month deployment in Afghanistan shrouded in secrecy is a key piece of Pete Buttigieg's pitch to voters in the 2020 presidential race, with the former South Bend, Indiana, mayor arguing that his status as a veteran and his time in a war zone give him foreign policy gravitas and first-hand military experience none of his Democratic primary rivals can claim. Published February 26, 2020

Under Secretary of Defense for Policy John Rood speaks during a news conference on the 2018 Nuclear Posture Review, at the Pentagon, Friday, Feb. 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) ** FILE **

Top Pentagon official John Rood to resign

The Pentagon's top policy official was pushed out of his job Wednesday at the direct request of President Trump, marking the latest senior defense official to leave his post in the last six months amid tensions over the extent of White House influence in military affairs. Published February 19, 2020