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Carlo Muñoz

Carlo Muñoz is the military correspondent for The Washington Times focusing on U.S. defense and national security policy, programs and operations.

He was most recently a foreign correspondent with the Stars and Stripes Mideast bureau, based in Kabul, Afghanistan. Mr. Muñoz also reported on U.S. and foreign military operations in South America, Cuba and the Asia-Pacific region. His work has appeared in The Guardian, United Press International, Atlantic Media, Air Force Magazine, USNI News and elsewhere.

He can be reached at [email protected]

Latest Podcast Episodes for Inheriting Chaos

Articles by Carlo Muñoz

In this June 18, 2018, photo, President Donald Trump holds up the space policy directive that he signed during a National Space Council meeting in the East Room of the White House in Washington.  Trump is moving closer toward his goal of creating a Space Force, but it won't begin as a separate military branch as the president envisioned. The Space Force instead initially will be created as part of the Air Force, but could be spun into a separate military department in the future. That's according to senior administration officials who briefed journalists on a directive Trump is scheduled to sign Tuesday to establish the Space Force. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) **FILE**

U.S. military no long unchallenged for dominance in outer space

Washington's defense doctrine to maintain overwhelming military superiority in space is now null and void, in the face of the growing challenge posed by Russia and China, said the White House's pick to lead the new U.S. Space Command. Published June 4, 2019

Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., arrives for a closed-door meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018i. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) ** FILE **

Congress presses again for Space Force details

Members of the Senate Armed Services Committee members on Tuesday pressed the White House's pick to lead the Pentagon's new Space Command on how the command will work with existing space operations handled by the Air Force and the intelligence community. Published June 4, 2019

South Korean President Moon Jae-in, right, shakes hands with acting U.S. Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan during a meeting at the presidential Blue House in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, June 3, 2019. Shanahan arrived in Seoul on Sunday for a two-day visit to discuss the situation on the Korean Peninsula and ways to boost the alliance between the two countries. (Bae Jae-man/Yonhap via AP)

Large-scale U.S. war games with South Korea no longer needed, says Pentagon chief

The Pentagon will not seek reinstatement of large-scale war games between the U.S. and South Korea, suspended in the wake of failed denuclearization talks between the Trump administration and North Korea last March, but instead will opt for much smaller military drills with its allies in Seoul. Published June 3, 2019

In this Feb. 12, 2009, file photo, the Pentagon is seen from Air Force One. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

D.C., Virginia big winners in Pentagon money chase: study

U.S. states receive roughly $1,500 per person from the Defense Department's massive spending budget annually, but those dollars are distributed on a strikingly uneven basis, with the District of Columbia and Virginia the biggest recipients of the Pentagon's largesse, a new Pew report shows. Published May 31, 2019

Acting U.S. Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan, left, meets with China's Minister of National Defense Wei Fenghe during a meeting on the sidelines of the 18th International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) Shangri-la Dialogue, an annual defense and security forum in Asia, in Singapore, Friday, May 31, 2019. (AP Photo/Lolita Baldor)

Shanahan, Pentagon hit Beijing over South China Sea aggression

The Pentagon issued a scathing rebuke Friday of what it said were China's destabilizing military, economic and diplomatic policies across the globe, focusing particularly on the contested waters of the South China Sea, saying Beijing's efforts were designed to upend international stability across the Asia-Pacific and beyond. Published May 31, 2019

In this April 5, 2019, photo, residents watch as local militia and Iraqi army soldiers walk past their home during a raid in Badoush, Iraq. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana) ** FILE **

Iraq's Shia militias spark military buildup as U.S.-Iranian tension soars

Iraq's powerful and politically potent Shia militias are becoming a flashpoint in the escalating clash between the U.S. and Iran, with the Trump White House citing the militias' rise -- and the threat they pose to American forces -- as a key justification for the recent military buildup in the Middle East. Published May 29, 2019