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Carlo Muñoz

Carlo Muñoz is the military correspondent for The Washington Times focusing on U.S. defense and national security policy, programs and operations.

He was most recently a foreign correspondent with the Stars and Stripes Mideast bureau, based in Kabul, Afghanistan. Mr. Muñoz also reported on U.S. and foreign military operations in South America, Cuba and the Asia-Pacific region. His work has appeared in The Guardian, United Press International, Atlantic Media, Air Force Magazine, USNI News and elsewhere.

He can be reached at [email protected]

Latest Podcast Episodes for Inheriting Chaos

Articles by Carlo Muñoz

In this undated file photo released online in the summer of 2014 on a militant social media account, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, militants of the Islamic State group hold up their weapons and wave its flags on their vehicles in a convoy on a road leading to Iraq, in Raqqa, Syria. (Militant photo via AP, File)

U.S. mulls expansion of military force in Mideast to battle ISIS

American and European military leaders are considering options to step up the fight against the Islamic State, including possibly upping the number of U.S. and allied troops on the ground in Iraq and Syria and expanding military operations against the terror group in Libya, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter said Tuesday. Published May 3, 2016

A war planner at the Pentagon said Islamic State fighters are losing land and are restricted in maneuvers on the battlefield as coalition precision airstrikes destroy vehicles, locations and munitions. (U.S. Navy)

U.S. air power remaining in Persian Gulf to stabilize region: Naval chief

The White House's decision to extend the deployment of a U.S. carrier strike group in the Persian Gulf was not driven by the need for additional American air power in the fight against Islamic State, but rather part of a larger effort to maintain regional stability. Published May 2, 2016

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, testifying on Capitol Hill, was taken to task over the administration's characterization of anti-Islamic State operations in Syria and Iraq as a noncombat mission.

Ashton Carter, lawmakers clash over Iraq 'war' rhetoric

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter clashed sharply with lawmakers on Capitol Hill Thursday over the White House's refusal to say the U.S. military was in a full-fledged war in Iraq and Syria, even as the administration was announcing a fresh round of deployments to both countries to fight the Islamic State. Published April 28, 2016

The view from the 16th floor of a Pentagon City hotel Wednesday, April 27, 2016, in Arlington, Va., shows the bulk of land of a proposed 38-acre expansion the Army hopes to use to expand Arlington National Cemetery and extend the life of the facility by 20 years, into the mid-2050s. Army officials held a briefing and community forum at the hotel  to explain their plans for the $274 million project, which include a land swap with Arlington County to improve traffic on a busy commuter corridor. (AP Photo/Matthew Barakat)

Four ex-high-ranking Army officers exonerated in Pentagon acquisition scandal

A federal court on Wednesday exonerated four former high-ranking Army officers accused of orchestrating a large-scale bribery scheme involving under-the-table payments to Pentagon acquisition officials in an attempt to secure lucrative Defense Department contracts for their Virginia-based government contracting firm. Published April 27, 2016

Donald Trump roiled U.S. and international leaders after repeatedly suggesting that Japan and South Korea should acquire nuclear weapons and saying at one point that it was "just a matter of time." (Associated Press)

Donald Trump stirs nuclear weapons interest in South Korea, Japan

Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump stunned U.S. military officials and the defense policy establishment with his suggestion this month that the U.S. should stop trying to prevent its allies South Korea and Japan from obtaining nuclear weapons. Published April 26, 2016

FILE - In this Monday, April 4, 2016 file photo, people flee their homes during clashes between Iraqi security forces and Islamic State group in Hit, 85 miles (140 kilometers) west of Baghdad, Iraq. Families, many with small children and elderly relatives say they walked for hours Monday through desert littered with roadside bombs to escape airstrikes and clashes. (AP Photo/Khalid Mohammed, File)

U.S. airstrikes cost ISIS nearly $800M

American airstrikes against Islamic State banks and cash houses in Iraq and Syria over the last several months have cost the terror group between $300 million and $800 million, the U.S. officer in charge of operations said Tuesday. Published April 26, 2016

In this Thursday, April 14, 2016 photo, Smoke rises above a controlled land mine, which was detonated by Russian experts, in the ancient town of Palmyra in the central Homs province, Syria. Cluster munitions, land mines, and other unexploded ordinances are killing Syria's civil defense volunteers as they work to make battle-torn areas safe for civilians to return. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)

Russia ratchets up airstrikes against Syrian rebels

Russian warplanes have ratcheted up their operations in the skies above Syria, striking anti-government targets in the country a day after the Pentagon announced it was ramping up its own military mission in the country, a top U.S. commander said Tuesday. Published April 26, 2016