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Michael Taube

Michael Taube

Michael Taube is a contributor for The Washington Times.

Articles by Michael Taube

Recalling the lesser known pioneers who settled the Northwest Territory

Early Americans had a true pioneering spirit. This was certainly the case with those brave individuals who travelled along the Ohio River and settled in the Northwest Territory several years after the American Revolution ended. In search of adventure, prosperity, social standing and a new way of life, they left their indelible mark on a young country -- and a legacy for others to emulate. Published June 17, 2019

In search of pelts

Pierre-Esprit Radisson, the 17th century French fur trader and explorer, is a largely forgotten historical figure. Yet, his name is tied to the founding of the Hudson's Bay Co., and a successful hotel chain is named after him. Published May 19, 2019

The joy of reading aloud

To develop a true passion of reading, it's important to consume books with your inner and outer voice. The former is taught to us in our homes and schools, whereas the latter is slowly becoming a lost art. We need to reverse this trend to preserve the fond, therapeutic memories of being read a book aloud by our parents and the beauty of reading aloud to our children. Published May 2, 2019

Building cars and confidence

North America has long been one of the world's largest auto producing sectors. But it's not the economic powerhouse it used to be. Published April 30, 2019

Revealing the experience of a Canadian train porter

Trains have been the lifeblood of society since the days of ancient Greece. The creation of the steam, locomotive and electronic models, along with the more recent high speed rail, have been used as crucial modes of transportation for people, places and things. Published April 10, 2019

Photographs that told a different story

Ernest Withers was one of America's first successful black photographers. He captured stunning images of civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King Jr., blues musicians like B.B. King, and Negro League stars like Satchel Paige. His coverage of the Emmett Till murder trial, one of the most notorious lynchings in Mississippi's history, brought this horrible episode into the national spotlight. Published March 11, 2019

Hawking's last stand

Stephen Hawking was one of the world's greatest scientists. He battled amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) for more than 50 years, and produced groundbreaking work in physics, cosmology and popular science. His book, "A Brief History of Time" (1988), which sold more than 10 million copies in 20 years, made him a household name -- along with TV appearances on "Star Trek: The Next Generation," "The Big Bang Theory" and "The Simpsons." Published February 4, 2019

Monty Python and the sunken ship

In 1841, the British explorer Sir John Franklin set a course for the Arctic with two ships, the HMS Terror and HMS Erebus. The expedition was considered lost until 2014, when the Erebus (which Franklin had sailed in) was discovered in Queen Maud Gulf in Nunavut, Canada. Published December 31, 2018

How Impressionism made an impression in Denmark

Denmark is known for its quality of life, social mobility, cuisine, outdoor sports and exceedingly high taxes. Few would likely have included one of the more impressive collections of French Impressionism on their list. Published December 20, 2018

Canada gets it right on free speech (for a change)

Few observers would ever describe Canada as a shining beacon of light for free speech. While the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms may depict this democratic right as a "fundamental freedom," my country nevertheless places strict limitations on speech which makes it far less free here than in the United States. Published November 8, 2018

How populism and conservatism can work together

The wheels of politics are often changing and evolving. The key to political success is to identify these transformations, modify certain policies and fortify the language and communication going forward. Published October 23, 2018

'The factory still defines our world'

For three centuries, the factory system has thrived in our world. It became an important friend and ally of capitalists and communists. It played an important role in the 19th-century Industrial Revolution. It created products that led to greater economic growth, job opportunities and market share. It pitted bosses against workers, caused the rise of trade unions, and could make or break the future of a city, town and community. Published September 20, 2018

Fred Rogers   Associated Press photo

'Won't you be my (Republican) neighbor?'

For people of a certain age (well, my age), the mere mention of educational children's television programs immediately brings back fond memories. This includes "Sesame Street," "The Electric Company" and "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood." Published August 7, 2018

Examining a Founder's vision of a working economy

Some people will remember reading about Alexander Hamilton in their history books due to his fatal July 11, 1804, duel with Vice President Aaron Burr. Others will instantly recall the award-winning Broadway musical "Hamilton," which dealt with aspects of his life and career through song and dance. Published July 24, 2018

Inside the corridors of Canadian power

U.S.-Canada relations are at a low point, due to the ongoing trade war which has engulfed our two nations. Nevertheless, we've been close friends, allies and trading partners for over a century in spite of our differences, both subtle and profound. Published June 19, 2018

How the goats got Jack Johnson

U.S. President Donald Trump announced in April he was considering a pardon for Jack Johnson, the first black heavyweight boxing champion. Published May 16, 2018

The lion, the witch and the children's book

Some people believe children's books are only written for, and read by, children. This couldn't be further from the truth. Those same children, when they grow up and become adults, often re-read their favorite stories to their children and grandchildren. Published March 26, 2018

The battle of the superheroes

One of my favorite childhood memories was going to Comics Unlimited, a now-defunct comic book store close to my high school. My friends and I would enthusiastically snatch up just about every new title before it was placed on the racks. Published February 22, 2018

Book jacket: "Angels in the Sky: How a Band of Volunteer Airmen Saved the State of Israel"

Flying to save a young nation

When the State of Israel was founded on May 14, 1948, it was immediately under attack by its Arab neighbors. Published January 10, 2018