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Peter Morici

Peter Morici

Peter Morici is an economist and business professor at the University of Maryland, and a national columnist. He can be reached at pmorici@umd.edu.

Columns by Peter Morici

China, the renegade state, won’t play by the trade rules

President Trump enjoys bipartisan support for his tough stand on China, but Democrats and farm state Republicans indicate they could desert him if he fails to bring home an agreement that ends China's piracy of American technology and finally opens its markets to U.S. products. Published May 19, 2019

President Donald Trump arrives to speak on energy infrastructure at the Cameron LNG export facility, Tuesday, May 14, 2019, in Hackberry, La. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

What Trump naysayers miss is that the economy is growing in different ways than in the past

Welcome to the Trump prosperity — the 3 percent GDP growth accomplished since the recent tax cuts and assault on abusive government regulation took hold are just a prelude of what could be accomplished if the endless Democratic attacks don't bring down the administration and the organized left — the mainstream media, radical feminists and socialists — don't highjack our personal liberties and destroy American capitalism. Published May 14, 2019

Associated Press

Policy rooted in flawed economic theories

After years of frustration, the Federal Reserve believes it has accomplished its goal of 2 percent inflation. In reality, international oil markets did much more than its interest rate policies to raise prices and the Fed should abandon that target altogether. Published May 7, 2019

Helicopter Money Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Toward a more democratic Federal Reserve

The Federal Reserve — frustrated by its inability to consistently accomplish strong growth and 2 percent inflation — is reviewing strategies. Maybe it should simply hand out money to ordinary folks, helicopter money, instead of just to banks. Published April 30, 2019

Bernie's Health Plan Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Bernie Sanders’ Medicare numbers don’t work

Democratic presidential hopefuls are at it again — promising free college tuition, forgiveness of student debt and to dramatically lower what individuals pay for health care. Like President Obama, if any lands in the Oval Office, the country could be saddled with another albatross — the Affordable Care Act has not tamed health care costs but it has so radically altered the marketplace that voters are afraid to dismember it. Published April 23, 2019

FILE - In this Nov. 7, 2018, file photo, fallen leaves cover cars and sidewalks on a tree-lined residential block in Long Island City in the Queens borough of New York. How your parents prepare for retirement, long-term care and estate planning can affect your own financial future. Talking to them now can save your family headaches and messy conversations down the road. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

Stress testing your retirement plans

If you are planning to retire sometime in the next several years, then you should stress test your plans — living arrangements, retirement portfolio and income and anticipated leisure pursuits — because retirement is like your first days in kindergarten, full of surprises. Published April 16, 2019

Taller Buildings Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Building taller cities to cope with climate change is less costly than the Green New Deal

Humans are unique in our ability to change the environment and unlock the secrets of nature. Erecting shelters, building aqueducts and mining the Earth, we moved from the temperate plains of Africa and caves of Chauvet-Pont d'Arc to harness agriculture, establish great cities and create technological wonders. Fossil fuels accelerated the ascent of man but according to the architects of the 2016 Paris Agreement, we must curb our appetite or global warming will make uninhabitable vast settlements. Published April 2, 2019

Cashless Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why America should go cashless

Most folks purchasing a Curry Chickpea Bowl at Sweetgreen or a Nora Roberts novel at an Amazon brick-and-mortar store reflexively pay with a credit or debit card or an app -- they might be surprised if they try a 20-dollar bill. Published March 14, 2019

Economy Boost Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump should call out Congress to boost the economy

President Trump's economy has been good so far, but to sustain the momentum and raise his re-election prospects he should champion policies that many Republican or Democratic members of Congress don't like, are inclined to obstruct but could be persuaded to accept. Published March 11, 2019