Topic - Douglas H. Shulman

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  • IRS official Lois Lerner is sworn in on Capitol Hill in Washington on May 22, 2013, before the House Oversight Committee hearing to investigate the extra scrutiny IRS gave to tea party and other conservative groups that applied for tax-exempt status. Lerner told the committee she did nothing wrong and then invoked her constitutional right to not answer lawmakers' questions. (Associated Press)

    Answers on IRS only raise more questions and calls for a special investigation

    Three days of hearings have shown that IRS scrutiny of conservative organizations extended beyond a few rogue employees in Cincinnati, that the agency staged its announcement of the bad news to try to limit the damage, and that the White House knew more, and knew it earlier, than it first admitted.

  • Former IRS Commissioner Douglas Shulman testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington on May 22, 2013, before the House Oversight the Government Reform Committee hearing to investigate the extra scrutiny IRS gave to tea party and other conservative groups that applied for tax-exempt status. (Associated Press)

    Political appointee's hands-off excuse is rejected at IRS hearing

    Former IRS Commissioner Douglas H. Shulman's testimony that he deliberately kept himself in the dark about the tax service's brewing scandal runs counter to the responsibilities of agency heads regardless of whether they are political appointees, some government analysts said.

  • IRS official Lois Lerner is sworn in on Capitol Hill in Washington on May 22, 2013, before the House Oversight Committee hearing to investigate the extra scrutiny IRS gave to tea party and other conservative groups that applied for tax-exempt status. Lerner told the committee she did nothing wrong and then invoked her constitutional right to not answer lawmakers' questions. (Associated Press)

    IRS head Lois Lerner, who invoked 5th Amendment, may be compelled to testify

    The woman at the center of the IRS scandal refused to testify to Congress on Wednesday, but House Republicans said Lois Lerner botched her attempt to invoke her right against self-incrimination and said they likely will force her to come back and explain why the agency targeted conservative political groups.

  • Former IRS commissioner says scrutiny was not his job as a political appointee

    The man who led the Internal Revenue Service when it was inappropriately scrutinizing conservative groups' applications for tax-exempt status said Tuesday that he intentionally kept himself in the dark about those kinds of decisions because he thought, as a political appointee, he should keep his distance.

  • Former IRS Commissioner Douglas H. Shulman, whose term expired in November, will be on Capitol Hill this week to testify about the agency's extra scrutiny of tea party-related groups.
(Associated Press)

    Former IRS chief faces bipartisan ire on Capitol Hill

    As the IRS scandal gains traction and a bipartisan chorus on Capitol Hill demands more answers, the man who headed the agency at the time it was targeting conservative groups will be on the hot seat twice this week.

  • Rep. Paul Ryan, Wisconsin Republican

    PRUDEN: The big day for Swiss cheese, or the tax code

    Life is unfair, as John F. Kennedy famously observed. That might not have been the most memorable thing he ever said, but it's probably the most quoted, and when better to repeat it than on the last day for Americans to file their federal income tax returns.

  • Douglas H. Shulman, commissioner of internal revenue (The Washington Times)

    IRS chief: Average tax refund this year about $3,000

    The nice Internal Revenue Service refund check that many families eagerly await this time of year is down slightly from 2011 but still not too shabby: an average of about $3,000.

  • Shulman

    IRS chief: Agency not targeting tea party groups

    The head of the Internal Revenue Service has told Congress his agency isn't denying tax-exempt status to tea party groups because of their political views.

  • Political Scene

    Federal communications regulators proposed new rules on Tuesday that they say will help bring broadband to all of rural America.

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