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Illustration on the threat of hurricanes to the electrical grid by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lights that a hurricane can’t blow out

With millions of Americans experiencing power outages due to catastrophic hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, there has never been a more important time to look critically at the reliability and durability of our electrical grid. In Puerto Rico, which has been devastated by Hurricane Maria, reports indicate that it will take months — or even as long as a year — for the power to be fully restored.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell watches from the sidelines before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers in Minneapolis, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn)

NFL missed golden opportunity

- The Washington Times

Commissioner Roger Goodell emerged from a meeting with NFL players and owners and announced, indirectly, that it was still A-OK to kneel for the national anthem. “We did not ask for that,” he said, in answer to a question about whether the league would demand players stand. And in so doing, the NFL has missed a golden opportunity to soothe and calm tensions.

Illustration of Fethullah Gulen by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fethullah Gulen, a pious Muslim or a radical Islamist?

Controversial Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen is back in the news following a diplomatic standoff between Turkey and the United States. On Oct. 8, the U.S. mission in Turkey announced a decision “to suspend all non-immigrant visa services at all U.S. diplomatic facilities in Turkey,” in retaliation for the arrest of a Drug Enforcement Administration liaison in Turkey with suspected ties to Mr. Gulen. Turkey has answered in kind by freezing the issuance of new visas.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., the ranking member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The problem with Obamacare subsidies

Late last week, President Trump signed an executive order directing the secretaries of the Treasury and health and human services to cease making payments to health care insurance companies in behalf of the more than 6 million Americans who qualify for these payments under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare.

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Strapping Sigmund Freud to his own couch

If there is anything to the theory of reincarnation, Sigmund Freud must have been Moby Dick in a past life and his most recent biographer, Frederick Crews, was probably Captain Ahab.

It's All About the Votes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Trump-McConnell detente

That was some chaotic scene in the White House Rose Garden Monday. After lunch with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Trump assured combative reporters and the country that the two are getting along just fine, in spite of the Senate's failure to repeal and replace Obamacare and an uncertain future over tax reform, the other Republican signature issue party members promised to get done.

Illustration on the growing accusations against men as a group for sexual misconduct by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Young men's lives matter, too

Everybody despises Harvey. Usually by this time in the public pursuit of a villain the scoundrel begins to attract a little undeserved sympathy. Not this time. The accusers keep on coming, with the passion of Emile Zola famously accusing the French government of hounding Alfred Dreyfus -- "J' accuse!" -- only because he was a Jew.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More than just a swamp dweller

- The Washington Times

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is regarded by most conservatives and Republicans outside Washington as the embodiment of all that's wrong with Washington. A recent Harvard study found him the least popular of all nationally known political figures and a group of my fellow conservatives told him in an open letter that as far as they're concerned, he is "the swamp."

In a Wednesday, Sep. 20, 2017 photo, Carmen De Molina, who became blind five years ago from diabetes, works on walking with her cane through Ridley's while grocery shopping with the Wyoming Independent Living class in Casper, Wyo. The class allows visually impaired individuals and people with other disabilities to practice skills which they can use to be more independent.  (Josh Galemore/The Casper Star-Tribune via AP)

Slavery, a modern-day tragedy

Today it is possible that the clothes and shoes you wear, the mobile phone, computer and laptop you use, the chocolate you eat, the diamonds, gold and jewelry you wear, the coffee and tea you drink, and the food you consume have, at some point, been touched by the hands of slaves.

Pope Francis acknowledges the applause of the audience after he delivered his speech during the visit to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) on the occasion of the World Food Day, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017.(AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

When interfaith bonding rings false

Pope Francis has become a rock star with refugees -- his hip picture on Caritas.org looks like a still from a Beyonce video. The Catholic Church kicked off its two-year "Share The Journey" campaign on Sept. 27, 2017.

The Clinton Protection Racquet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary and Harvey's shared fate

I have been fascinated by Harvey Weinstein's initial response to charges that the Bathrobed Romeo sexually molested women. His statement was at once otherworldly and yet weirdly similar to Hillary Clinton's eventual response to the scandal. I say "eventual response" because it took her over a week to comment. Obviously, Hillary's lawyers and public relations magicians had to word her response very carefully.

Illustration on salvaging the U.S./Iran nuclear agreement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump's third way

President Trump made a tough call last week. European diplomats and an "echo chamber" in the mainstream media were insisting he "recertify" the nuclear weapons deal his predecessor concluded with Iran's rulers in 2015.

Teaching the Birds and Bees at School Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How federally funded sex education sexualizes schoolchildren

Upon returning to middle school from an orthodontist appointment to tighten his braces, 12-year-old Johnny struggles through a pre-algebra lecture then schlepps off to his health class where he is instructed in anal sex, oral sex, masturbation and sexual fantasy.

Stop the Shooters Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Stopping the high-rise shooter

Like most Americans, I have watched hours of TV coverage of the massacre at Las Vegas. The question that is constantly recurring in the commentaries is the wrong one: what was his motive?

William Dodd Jr. speaks on the radio during debate within the United States on whether to enter World War II. International News Service photo.

How Russians meddled in the 1938 election

Did Russia meddle in the 2016 presidential election? President Donald Trump emphatically says "no." But the hierarchy of the U. S. intelligence community is equally firm in saying "yes." With three probes in progress -- two by Congress, another by an independent counsel -- an answer perhaps will eventually be found.

The future of nature may not be all that bad

Inheritors of the Earth" is a thoroughgoing study of the vast variety of species and their evolution. The book thoughtfully challenges traditional negative views of nature and humans interaction with nature. The interaction isn't necessarily all bad, and may likely be mostly good. The book provides ample examples of how original habitats are "not so much destroyed as replaced by a new environment that still contains quite a lot of species."

Pope Francis acknowledges the applause of the audience after he delivered his speech during the visit to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) on the occasion of the World Food Day, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017.(AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Pope Francis, biblically challenged, blames climate change -- again

- The Washington Times

Once again, Pope Francis has pressed forward the mantra that much of the world's problems -- hunger, overrun borders -- are due to man's failures to stop wars and address climate change. This is odd, given a more biblical perspective might say, oh let's see, wars come from evil desires and hunger, in large part, from wars.