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Illustration on the aggressive strategic future of Syria by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The new ‘great game’ in Syria

In the second half of the 19th century, the British and Russian empires competed for domination of Central Asia in what history labels “The Great Game.” A new “great game,” with the entire Middle East at stake, is now being played out in Syria. The opponents are Russia and Iran on one side and the U.S. and Israel on the other. Both sides will try to use Arab states and Turkey as pawns.

Logical Progression of a Gun Ban Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

More laws do not a moral people make

This past Valentine’s Day, Nikolas Cruz entered a classroom in Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, and proceeded to murder 17 people and wound 15 others. Before any meaningful criminal investigation could even begin, our nation’s cultural elites rushed to their respective podiums, finding fault and casting aspersions. Scoring political points is the name of the game. Removing personal rights embedded in our Constitution and replacing them with more laws and less freedom seems to be the only way they know to keep score.

Chart to acccompany Moore article of Feb. 19, 2018.

Obama’s real debt and deficit legacy

- The Washington Times

Congressional Republicans have been raked over the coals in the last two weeks for slamming through budget caps and inflating government spending and debt by another $300 billion. The criticisms are well deserved.

Unrest in India Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

India’s democracy and Modi’s reforms

If there’s one thing we’ve learned about Prime Minister Narendra Modi is that he’s not afraid of using radical maneuvers to accomplish his economic agenda for India.

Related Articles

In this Jan. 14, 2017, photo, tax forms sit on a desk at the start of the tax season rush, inside the offices of tax preparation firm Infinite Tax Solutions, in Boulder, Colo. Filing taxes early could speed your return and protect your identity. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Taxing America out of its liberties

As you struggle to submit something to Uncle Sam that won't send federal agents to your door, guns blazing, it's worth pondering how immoral and unconstitutional the whole thing is.

A penetrating look at Putin's rule

Fellow writers take note: Your work is being monitored every day by a Russian agency that formerly was part of the Russian SVR foreign intelligence service, successor to the KGB of the old Soviet Union.

Illustration on Mongolia's desire to separate from China by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Divided, Mongolia cannot stand

A celebrity and business tycoon being elected president. A man whose campaign touted nationalism, with a slogan of putting the nation "first."

Patent Law Working Properly Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Patent reform and innovation

On February 5, the Senate confirmed Andre Iancu as director of the Patent and Trademark Office.

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with North Korean defectors where he talked with reporters about allowing the release of a secret memo on the FBI's role in the Russia inquiry, in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, Feb. 2, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) ** FILE **

The perilous Trump budget

After promising voters in 2016 that he would balance the budget, President Trump has proposed a $4.4 trillion spending plan for fiscal year 2019 that is dangerously unbalanced.

Generosity, faith and small amounts of joy

"The Ninth Hour" begins with the suicide on a gray February afternoon of a young man while his wife, with "a baby coming in summer," was shopping for their supper.

This Feb. 19, 2013, file photo shows OxyContin pills arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. The maker of the powerful painkiller said it will stop marketing opioid drugs to doctors, a surprise reversal after lawsuits blaming the company for helping trigger the current drug abuse epidemic. OxyContin has long been the worlds top-selling opioid painkiller and generated billions in sales for privately held Purdue. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)

Opioid regulation not the way to fight ODs, cure addiction

- The Washington Times

The country's gone head-over-heels nuts on opioids, the drug of effectiveness for long-time pain sufferers. As if cracking down on producers, distributors, insurers and sellers will cure the underlying roots of addiction -- the psychological and emotional factors that lead to a practice of self-destruction.

Illustration on female empowered nudity by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Uncovering the naked truth

Playboy magazine, now a relic in the legacy of its founder, Hugh Hefner, was not so long ago the sex educator of the young men of America. So pervasive was its influence that someone joked that "a generation of men, having learned about the female body from Playboy's famous centerfolds, are astonished on their wedding nights to discover that their wives don't come with staples in their navels."

Illustration on the national debt by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Don't worry about the national debt

"If something cannot go on forever, it will stop," said Herbert Stein, President Nixon's chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors. America's national debt has grown from 32 percent of GDP in 1981 to 68 percent in 2008 and 108 percent in 2017. The national debt is high, and some components are growing on autopilot. Still, Washington keeps adding to it.

Illustration on welfare and poverty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The war that never ends

There is a war that has lasted longer than the one in Afghanistan. It is the so-called "war on poverty," launched by President Lyndon Johnson during his State of the Union address on Jan. 8, 1964.

Illustration on the downsides of bipartisanship by Linas Garsys/the Washington Times

The downside of bipartisanship

The House and Senate's passage of "a two-year budget deal," (plus an appropriation to avoid a "government shutdown" for a month, during which the details of that deal may be negotiated) is news because the "deal" spends 13.5 percent more for the coming two fiscal years than the Obama administration had proposed for them, and expands the government at an unprecedented rate. By comparison, President Obama was a conservative. Who'd a thunk it?