Political Commentary - Washington Times
Skip to content

Commentary

Featured Articles

Kim il-Sung (Associated Press)

Billy Graham, preaching from the belly of the beast

- The Washington Times

Five of us from The Washington Times were invited to Pyongyang in April 1992 by Kim Il-Sung, the grandfather of Rocket Man. The man called “the Great Leader,” regarded as the founder of the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea, wanted to open his hermit kingdom to the world, and we were the first Western newspapermen to test whether North Korea could withstand a regiment of editors and reporters in their midst for 11 days.

Illustration on the goals and ideals of CPAC by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The significance of CPAC 2018

Inflection points in national dialogue and history are easy to miss. This week’s Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington, D.C., is one — it represents a key gathering, of key leaders, in a key year, on key issues. From 2018 election strategy and tax cuts to national security and gun rights, what gets said here matters to America’s future.

Illustration on stopping school shootings by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Stopping school shootings by arming teachers

When Donald Trump called for arming teachers in 2015, he was met with the expected derision from gun control advocates and other progressives. All proposals to arm teachers are met with similar derision by liberals who warn of the dangers of “militarizing” schools. While this chin dribbling continues, school shootings have increased to a point where 150,000 of our nation’s students have now experienced a school shooting or the threat of one.

No Takers for Puerto Rico's 4% Corporate Tax Rate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The failing tax haven of Puerto Rico

Until very recently, United States corporations were saddled with the highest tax rates in the world. Although the concept of economic growth spurred by tax cuts was previously successful in the U.S. under President John F. Kennedy in the 1960s and President Ronald Reagan in the 1980s, progressives in both parties seeking to find their own best ways to spend other people’s money steadily took both corporate and personal tax rates higher at different times.

Illustration on the fits and starts of economic recovery by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

A few bumps for the economy

Stocks on a roller coaster and surging inflation have just given policymakers and ordinary folks a jolt. Caution is always prudent but this is hardly time to panic.

Related Articles

Illustration on accusations of racism at Penn State by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Professor Amy Wax and the Brownshirts on campus

Recently a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School in league with a professor at the University of San Diego Law School made bold to write an essay for The Philadelphia Inquirer. Her name is Amy Wax, and I have no idea what her politics might be. That she has gained tenure at Penn suggests that she is a liberal, but that is about all I know about her. If she were teaching when I was in college back in the 1960s she almost certainly would have been a liberal. There were very few conservatives back then.

Ottoman Slap Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Turkey's violence-tinged foreign policy

Speaking recently about his military's ongoing invasion of the Kurdish-ruled Afrin region in northern Syria, Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan taught much of the world a rather bizarre term.

Illustration on Poland's new Holocaust law by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Poland's new Holocaust law is a mockery

The French philosopher Voltaire said, "History is nothing but a pack of tricks that we play upon the dead." Poland's new Holocaust law is yet another pack of tricks played upon the millions of murdered Jews in the Holocaust.

Illustration on Trump's Goldilocks economy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump's Goldilocks economy

President Trump may have a bear market, but he has a Goldilocks economy. While it is too early to definitively know about the former, each passing day shows the latter growing more certain. His critics who are seizing on recent stock market volatility are missing the bigger picture of the economy underlying it.

Illustration on sexual misconduct and opera by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Sexual harassment in opera

Opera has it all. Love. Murder. Rape. And most fascinating, in the case of Puccini's "Tosca" a peek into the rapist's thinking. In fact, he tells all. In church.

Vladimir Putin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Everybody's playing the new game in town

- The Washington Times

Washington measures everything and everyone by politics, and dysfunction is the new game in town. Rant and rage has become the lingua franca of the nation's capital. Taking the measure of Robert Mueller's indictment of 13 Russian cybernauts for interfering on Vladimir Putin's behalf in the 2016 presidential campaign is easy.

People participate in a candlelight vigil in memory of the 17 students and faculty who were killed in the Wednesday mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Monday, Feb. 19, 2018. Nikolas Cruz, a former student, was charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder on Thursday. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Warning signs ignored again

Reaction to the latest school shooting in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 people dead and many more wounded begins at the wrong end. It's not about passing more gun laws, which people intent on breaking existing laws will not obey; rather it is about heeding warning signs and doing something before it is too late.

Shooter Warning Sign Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Accountability and willful blindness

Those who serve in the military know they will be held accountable when they are irresponsible or reckless because the lives of their fellow warriors are at stake. In contrast, there is often little accountability in much of non-military government civil service, which often results in sloppy work practices.

Illustration on the need for clearer scrutiny and vetting for firearm purchases by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Confronting school shootings

In the emotional aftermath of every school shooting, experts criticize and offer solutions. "Arm teachers, more cops, fewer guns, psychiatric commitments and barbed wire perimeters." We can also have lengthy discussions on the disintegration of the family, but any real change is generations away. So, what now?

Philadelphia Aliens Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the radical agenda meets immigration

Liberal Democrats don't like the broad term illegal immigrants, so the joke goes, as they much prefer to think of them as undocumented future registered Democrats.

In this Dec. 4, 2017 photo, Southwest Minnesota hog producer Randy Spronk poses at his farm near Edgerton, Minn. Minnesota farmers like Spronk fear they could lose millions of dollars if the United States leaves the North American Free Trade Agreement.  (Mark Steil/Minnesota Public Radio via AP)

The trouble with tariffs

The stronger economy we're enjoying now is no accident. Lower taxes, more jobs and fewer regulations are creating a much-needed boost. So why do we still have one foot on the brake?

When a nation seals the fate of its enemies

Targeted assassination is a type of premeditated killing of those who pose an imminent threat. It is usually carried out by a covert intelligence or military unit often when the enemy's capture is made impossible by his protected presence in hostile territory.

In this Jan. 14, 2017, photo, tax forms sit on a desk at the start of the tax season rush, inside the offices of tax preparation firm Infinite Tax Solutions, in Boulder, Colo. Filing taxes early could speed your return and protect your identity. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Taxing America out of its liberties

As you struggle to submit something to Uncle Sam that won't send federal agents to your door, guns blazing, it's worth pondering how immoral and unconstitutional the whole thing is.

Illustration on the aggressive strategic future of Syria by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The new 'great game' in Syria

In the second half of the 19th century, the British and Russian empires competed for domination of Central Asia in what history labels "The Great Game." A new "great game," with the entire Middle East at stake, is now being played out in Syria. The opponents are Russia and Iran on one side and the U.S. and Israel on the other. Both sides will try to use Arab states and Turkey as pawns.