Political Commentary - Washington Times
Skip to content

Commentary

Helsinki Scoreboard Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Helsinki discords

Monday’s Helsinki summit meeting between President Trump and Russian President Putin began after Mr. Putin showed up almost an hour late. With Mr. Putin, such actions are never accidental. It was a put-down of Mr. Trump from which he never recovered entirely.

Quantum Action by Congress Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Transforming how information is processed and communicated

Quantum technology harnesses the radical power of quantum systems — such as isolated atoms, photons and electrons — to transform how we process and communicate information. But that potential can be realized only if our nation’s resources are focused in a way that helps bring quantum research from the laboratory to the marketplace.

Related Articles

FILE - In this file  July 7, 2016, photo then-FBI Director James Comey testifies before the House Oversight Committee to discuss Hillary Clinton's email investigation, at the Capitol in Washington. The Justice Department's watchdog faults former Comey for breaking with protocol in his handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation. But it says his decisions were not driven by political bias ahead of the 2016 election.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Former FBI Director James Comey delivered 3 blows that put the bureau down but not out

Current and former agents of the once most respected name in law enforcement must cringe in helpless disbelief every time a news headline crosses their computer containing the letters "FBI." "What is it this time?" They must think to themselves as they discover another verbal lashing by pundits and politicians in the furtherance of the day's agenda, but under the guise of patriotism and truth. Since when did the men and women of the FBI become a weapon of war in politics? What did they do to deserve this?

Illustration on U.S./ROK military exercizes by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Korean war games in the balance

I arrived in Seoul on the same day as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo after the Singapore summit. In the wake of the meeting between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, Mr. Pompeo and I had essentially the same task: Reassuring our allies.

Stonewall Jackson. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Is California too much of a good thing?

- The Washington Times

Cutting Texas down to size is always a good thing to do, and if we have to carve up California to do it, well, that's life. The current popular notion in California would divide the Golden State into three new states, something that could be no longer be called Golden but perhaps Plastic, Pewter and Brass.

More Jobs Available Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Weighing whether there are too many or too few jobs

Will there be too few or too many jobs in the future? We are told as a result of the artificial intelligence (AI) revolution with endless robots, autonomous vehicles, etc. that there will be far fewer jobs. Yet last week, despite record levels of automation, the Department of Labor announced that the country had reached the point where there were more jobs available than people seeking work.

Illustration on bias at the FBI by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Bias and the beholder

Would you consider a jihadist biased against Jews? Could a member of a white supremacist group be accused of bias against non-whites?

Illustration on the Pentagon's data cloud decision by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How the Pentagon clouds its future

Before D-Day, Gen. George Patton commanded an army that didn't exist. His First U.S. Army Group was supposedly training around East Anglia. It featured phony tanks so German spy planes could report on them. It kept up a steady stream of radio traffic so German spies could track the movements of troops. And it featured divisions that seemed to be preparing to invade Calais.

Bringing a most wanted drug kingpin to justice

Joaquin Guzman Loera was once listed by Forbes as one of the richest and most powerful businessmen in the world. Unfortunately for the world, Guzman's business was drug trafficking and murder.

Illustration on the I.G. report on the DOJ by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Outrage over bias at the FBI

The much-anticipated report of the Justice Department inspector general (IG) has satisfied neither Republicans nor Democrats. If you expected that the IG report would settle the endless debate about double standards (favoring either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump), that it would identify malefactors and punish the guilty, then you were sorely disappointed. Instead, Inspector General Michael Horowitz investigated heavily, labored mightily and produced a wrist-breaking tome that history will find wanting.

Anthony Bourdain Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The despair of Anthony Bourdain

In the early 1900s, G.K. Chesterton spoke of the unavoidable consequences of denying God as our Creator and worshipping science above the sacred. Observing that the naturalists of his day were only too willing to turn their science into a philosophy and then impose their new religion upon all of culture with near fanatic zeal, Chesterton said, "I [have] never said a word against eminent men of science. What I complain of is a vague popular philosophy which supposes itself to be scientific when it is really nothing but a sort of new religion and an uncommonly nasty one."

Chart to accompany Moore article of June 18, 2018.

Fake support for a free market in energy

All of a sudden everyone on the left wants "free markets in energy policy." As someone who's advocated for that for, oh, about three decades (let's start by shutting down the Energy Department), this riff should be music to my ears. But is laissez faire energy policy really what liberals are seeking?

Illustration on world population growth by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The discontent of civilization

During the post-World War II decades, global leaders and intellectuals were tortured with the prospect of a planet with too many people to feed, but now the industrialized world is challenged by too few babies and graying populations.

The most fascinating creatures ever to walk Earth

As a boy Steve Brusatte was taught "that dinosaurs were big, scaly, stupid brutes so ill-equipped for their environment that they just lumbered around, biding their time, waiting to go extinct. Evolutionary failures. Dead ends in the history of life." He didn't believe a word of it.

In a March 11, 2015 photo, U.S. Rep. Mark Sanford, R-S.C., right, speaks to attendees at a meeting of the federal  Bureau of Ocean Energy Management in Mount Pleasant, S.C., to take public comment on opening areas off the Atlantic  coast to drilling for oil and natural gas. The views of the five coastal congressmen in the Carolinas vary on the issue in states where the governors are advocates for offshore drilling but 18 coastal communities have gone on record against it.  (AP Photo/Bruce Smith)

Donald Trump 'loyalty pledge' the language of disgruntled losers

- The Washington Times

A great deal has been made in recent times about this so-called "loyalty pledge" members of the Republican Party must make to President Donald Trump, else face the wrath of the -- umm, the voters? The White House? Ghosts of right-wing pasts? Exactly. Who knows. But let's not confuse a loyalty pledge with voter will.

Photo courtesy Shelby Summers

'What Father's Day means to me'

At about 6 in the morning on Aug. 3, 2009, I had a package delivered to me in the shape of two Army Casualty Assistance Officers. As soon as I saw them, I knew.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Sex, lies and betrayal at the FBI

- The Washington Times

If Jeff Sessions and Christopher Wray want to clean house at the FBI, they'll be well advised to pack a good lunch. Cleaning this house will be an all-day job. The agency under James B. Comey has been more corrupt than we thought.

When Reagan went to the Wall

The unlikely meeting between President Donald J. Trump and North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un has ended amid handshakes, expressions of goodwill, and hopes — but no proof — that something good has begun.

Illustration on the opioid crisis by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Closing the knowledge gap on opioids

During a recent visit to Warrenton, Virginia, I sat down with 10 sets of parents to talk about the opioid crisis. One of the other speakers was Special Agent Tom Murphy of the Virginia State Police. Tom is a supervisor on a regional drug and gang task force, and he discussed the work of the multi-agency group combatting trafficking.