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People pass by the set of Today Show during the broadcast Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017, in New York. NBC News says longtime "Today" show host Matt Lauer has been fired for "inappropriate sexual behavior." Co-host Savannah Guthrie made the announcement at the top of Wednesday's show.  (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

An adulterous affair with a boss is not sexual harassment

- The Washington Times

Addie Zinone, a former production assistant for the “Today Show,” has come forward to say she and Matt Lauer engaged in a consensual sexual encounter in the 2000 time frame — but that she was a victim of his sexually harassing nature just the same. Maybe. But let’s be clear. Adultery is not the same as sexual harassment.

Illustration on the end of Net Neutrality regulations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Network neutrality comes to an end

They finally did it. After six months of debate, during which it received over 23 million public comments (of which half may have been fraudulent), the Federal Communications Commission voted on Dec. 14 to eliminate the network neutrality rules it imposed on broadband network operators during the Obama era.

Illustration on Hanukkah by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hanukkah, the first battle against transnationalism

Many think of Hanukkah as a fight for religious freedom. While religious freedom was at stake, it was part of a broader battle in behalf of the concept of national identity. The Maccabees, local Judeans who spearheaded the revolt against the overpowering northern Syrian Greeks, and who inspired the grass-roots, did so for the overarching cause of retaining Judea’s identity and Jewish character, which was under assault by those trying to denude Judea of its distinctiveness.

Illustration on global harmony by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

People, planet and climate working together

Another year of weather is coming to a close. Even with some record-breaking snowfall from this past weekend’s storm in the eastern U.S., in many ways weather this year was not much different from any other year since the regular recording of temperature, precipitation and wind began across much of the globe 150 years ago.

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No choice for China

If China doesn't decide to intervene and essentially "denuclearize" North Korea — and soon — the Pacific region will "nuclearize" itself, in reaction to China's inaction and the growing North Korean nuclear threat.

Trump Trade Policies Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump's unwise economic nationalism

At the recent Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit, Presidents Trump and Xi Jinping offered competing and disturbing visions of a new international economic order.

Illustration on volunteerism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Crowding out compassion

Anyone who has ever seen footage of a "Black Friday" stampede knows the holiday season can bring out the worst in people. So it's important to remember that it can also bring out the best — and to realize that government can inadvertently dampen our more compassionate impulses.

Following the terrorist money trail

Terrorist groups like ISIS raise hundreds of millions of dollars to finance their activities and attacks through illicit means. The Islamic Republic of Iran bankrolls its Palestinian Hamas and Lebanese Hezbollah proxies with large flows of cash. Hezbollah raises additional funds by engaging in criminal enterprises such as narco-trafficking across several continents.

Illustration on the deadly history of socialism/communism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Socialism's predictable outcomes

Despite several horrifying current examples of nations in the grip of socialism, many of America's millennials are happily skipping down the socialist Yellow Brick Road toward an Oz that could never be.

Conflict Between Oil Producers in Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perils of Saudi reform

In a dizzying sequence of events, Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman took a series of moves that will strengthen his status as heir to the throne and the face of his country's future. These included a roundup of prominent royals, businessmen, and officials and the arrest of a major international Saudi businessman. At the same time, Saudi defense systems intercepted a missile fired at Riyadh from Yemen, the Lebanese prime minister resigned his post during a visit to Saudi Arabia, and another powerful Saudi prince died in a helicopter crash.

Illustration on new GOP wisdom on taxes by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Stupid Party gets smart

Republicans have long been known as "the stupid party." They do stupid things, like waiting until mid-November to pass a must-pass tax cut that should have been done by April.

In this July 12, 2017 photo, Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn. arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington. The normally sleepy Senate Ethics Committee hasn't had a major case since 2011, but it could be deciding next year on the fate of three senators _ including two facing allegations of inappropriate sexual behavior. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A nation of moral geldings

Question: If the woman in the photo of Al Franken (where he's groping her while she sleeps) would have given "consent," then would this be right and good? If morality is really nothing more than mutual "consent" and Sen. Franken could prove that she said this was okay to do while she lay sleeping, he would have nothing — absolutely nothing — to be "ashamed" of. Right?

Illustration on U.S./Azerbaijan cooperation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Azerbaijan, an American partner

Azerbaijan has long been a partner of the United States. In the 26 years since we gained our independence, Azerbaijan has sought friendly relations with the United States. Formal bilateral relations were established with the sagacious efforts and diligence of the late president of Azerbaijan Heydar Aliyev and his American counterparts: U.S. Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton.

A Chinese danger that must not be taken lightly

Intelligence analysts and media pundits alike are puzzling whether Xi Jinping, president of China, deserves the recent Economist cover calling him the world's most powerful man.

Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., pauses during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on nominations on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Al Franken's astonishing pardon -- from a feminist, no less

- The Washington Times

Kate Harding, a feminist writer who's penned the book "Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance and Revolution in Trump's America," said that Sen. Al Franken should do penance for his sexual assault -- you know, the one captured in part on camera -- but not resign from political office. Harding's logic? He's a Democrat and his political voice is needed in Washington, D.C., she said. Astonishing.

Al Franken and Leeanne Tweeden

Gropergate! The halls of Congress under siege!

- The Washington Times

When I was a young reporter on a certain newspaper in the South, fresh on a new job, I took a fancy to a sweet and pretty young woman (that's how we talked in those days) working on what newspapers quaintly called "the Society pages."

Erika Harold

When a Miss America runs for office

- The Washington Times

It was 2014 and the first time attendees at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference or CPAC got a load of former Miss America Erika Harold who was invited to address the attendees as of one of the most promising young conservatives in the country. She is a black female lawyer from Illinois who had in 2003 been chosen Miss America. She had entered the Miss America pageant hoping to win enough money to go to Harvard Law School and did just that.

Why Trump should arm Ukraine

President Trump has often expressed his desire to build a better, more positive relationship with Russia. However, as Secretary of State Tillerson has said, improved bilateral relations will not be possible without ending Russia's aggression against Ukraine.

Illustration on the restoration of the Alamo by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Restoring, reinforcing and remembering the Alamo

As a native Texan, as a veteran, and as Texas land commissioner, it is my solemn duty and my great honor to be the caretaker of the Alamo. Who we are as Texans started there and who we can be as Texans and Americans still lives there.

Illustration of George Papadopoulos by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The Russian shadow

Thank goodness we live in a country where the people who represent us in Congress have the power to investigate and grill federal officials to root out wrongdoing in our government.

Honoring St. Francis as the boisterous man he was

Dario Fo, who died in 2016 at the age of 90, was an Italian playwright, actor, director, designer, painter, singer, songwriter and political campaigner for the Italian left. In awarding him the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1997, the Swedish Academy praised Mr. Fo as a writer "who emulates the jesters of the Middle Ages in scourging authority and upholding the dignity of the downtrodden."

United Nations U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley, right, listens as Organization of American States Secretary General Luis Almargo speaks during a U.N. meeting on human rights concerns in Venezuela, Monday Nov. 13, 2017, at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Nikki Haley quite rightly rocks U.N. boat on Venezuela

- The Washington Times

Human rights matter -- that's the message a resolute U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley just sent the Security Council's way, reminding that Venezuela, land of the socialists, shouldn't be allowed to skate on civil abuses. This is why Haley rocks. She's unafraid to take the high ground on behalf of America, even when world players disapprove.