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Angst of the Loser Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perennial taste of sour grapes

On her current book tour, Hillary Clinton is still blaming the Russians (among others) for her unexpected defeat in last year’s presidential election. She remains sold on a conspiracy theory that Donald Trump successfully colluded with Russian President Vladimir Putin to rig the election in Mr. Trump’s favor.

Courage and Vision of Columbus Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Good-bye, Columbus

With Columbus Day upon us leftist rage is approaching gale force. Blinded by their irrational hatred they denounce Columbus and the civilization he symbolized for every ill ever visited upon this hemisphere. They are domestic Taliban, whose goal is the cultural obliteration of our society.

A protester is silhouetted as he carries the United Nations flag during a rally against Nigerian President Buhari as pedestrians walk through federal plaza Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Jarring minds with facts, not fists

The economics of free speech have become quite strange. It took $600,000, a sea of police officers in riot gear and concrete barricades to ensure Berkeley didn’t devolve into anarchy and chaos when conservative political commentator Ben Shapiro came to town last week. Demonstrations outside remained mostly peaceful with only nine arrests. This, however, is a troubling sign in light of what comes next on Berkeley’s campus.

Illustration on John Dickinson     The Washington Times

Planting the seeds of American independence

This year marks the 250th anniversary of one of the most influential series of writings in American history: the first of John Dickinson’s Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania, which appeared in 1767.

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Illustration on Trump's recent deal with congressional Democrats by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump's option play

What just happened? President Trump cut a deal with Democrats to pay for hurricane damage relief and raise the debt ceiling without getting anything in return, except the temporary avoidance of a government shutdown. How to describe this? Was it a sellout, or a pragmatic act?

Satellite Defense Against Korea Missiles Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making space for missile defense

The crisis Kim Jong-un's regime has created worsens with each intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) it launches and every nuclear weapon it detonates. The North Koreans are neither begging for war, as U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley said, nor are they trying to extort money from America. This is something different.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The woman scorned, opening old sores

Feminist politics turned a corner with the final defeat of Hillary Clinton. You can feel it in and between the lines of her blame-game book, "What Happened." The exuberance of her supporters, which buoyed her in the campaign to elect the first woman president, has dissipated. All she has left is a memoir of an angry woman, raging that her time has passed, that the abundant fruit of opportunity that fell from the family tree was crushed beyond hopes of redemption and there's nothing left to put in a new bottle but old whine.

Illustration on Antifa's domestic terrorism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Antifa's 'domestic terrorist violence'

The serene, little university town of Charlottesville may have opened up a wound that will be with us for years to come. It might be more accurate to say reopened -- readers who are my age may remember the violence and destruction brought on by the anti-Vietnam War movement and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and its companions (comrades?) on the left. Now we're seeing it again with the Antifa thugs.

Kurt Warner illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Grooming more players for the gridiron

Before Week One of the National Football League began, more than 1,100 of the best football players in the world had their dreams end as NFL teams trimmed their rosters from 90 to 53 to start the regular season. Some of those players will sign with other teams. Others have been signed to a team's practice squad, which consists of 10 spots on each team where the player can practice with the team but can't play in the game.

Display of Civility Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A nation built upon civility

Americans of every political stripe are disgusted by the disrespect, hatred, violence and fear displayed so often in our beloved nation and are doing something about it.

Illustration on the hazards of potential global cooling by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Preventing the other climate catastrophe

Climate cooling, as opposed to warming, presents serious problems for humanity. As cooling causes agriculture to fail, most of the world's population will starve and we will be reduced from its present level to about a million, hunting animals and collecting nuts and seeds for sustenance. This has happened before during the ice ages, when nomadic bands of prehistoric humans had to shelter in caves for protection from the cold, and had to rely on uncertain supplies of food.

Illustration on North Korea's martial mentality by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Countering North Korea's nuclear blackmail

North Korea's official statements following its recent underground nuclear test for the first time revealed plans to use its nuclear weapons to create an electromagnetic pulse (EMP).

Illustration on improving the U.N. by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Fixing the United Nations

The United Nations was created in the wake of World War II by the major Allied nations that had prevailed -- at an enormous cost in blood and treasure -- over the Axis powers. Its founders proclaimed ambitious goals: to "save succeeding generations from the scourge of war," "reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights" and "promote social progress." That the U.N. hasn't come close to succeeding should, by now, be obvious.

Illustration on negotiating with North Korea by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Putting North Korea over a barrel

The theme of this year's 72nd session of the U.N. General Assembly is a world "striving for peace." This meeting of 193 member states comes at a time when one of its members, North Korea, is threatening nuclear conflict.

Illustration on corruption in Italy's support of refugees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Mafia and the migrants

I spotted them on my way to dinner with a friend near Castel Gandolfo. They are migrants from Africa, sitting by the side of the road outside a "temporary" residence that, for many, appears to have become permanent. They all have cellphones. They all seem oblivious to us as we pass by.

Myk Londino, manager of Vape O2, blows a plume of smoke at his shop in Philadelphia. An E Hookah is in the foreground. (Charles Fox/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)

Tax reform for businesses outside the corporate category

Corporate America's interest in tax reform is obvious and understandable. Similarly, politicians' interest in boosting our economy through incentives and breaks for large employers is not a mystery.