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A page from a Gutenberg Bible. (The Washington Times) ** FILE **

The wounded printed page strikes back

- The Washington Times

Fake news is everywhere, cluttering desktops, iPads, laptops, iPhones and all the other manifestations of the post-literate era when it’s just too much trouble to find a reliable read.

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Compelling essays that make good beach reading

We are into the summer reading season: the time when we choose books to take to the beach or the lake, or to while away the misery of planes and airports. Publishers see this as a chance to promote feel-pretty-good family sagas or romances, or mysteries that nudge the inner detective rather than threaten anything more serious.

Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-NY., right, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif., left, talk to one another after hosting a news conference to announce a proposed increase to teacher pay, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, May 22, 2018. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Democrats, desperate, face doozy of election fight

- The Washington Times

Democrats, according to recent polls, face what could kindly be called an uphill election-time battle. Kindly. More to truth, they're facing a Chimborazo climb, so dubbed in recognition of the world's highest peak -- yes, higher even than Mount Everest.

This April 20, 2018, photo shows a dealer conducting a game of roulette at Resorts Casino Hotel in Atlantic City N.J. Figures released by New Jersey gambling regulators on Tuesday May 22, show that Atlantic City's seven casinos saw their gross operating profit decline by nearly 12 percent in the first quarter of 2018, to $123.6 million. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

Gambling on sports is a bad bet

Human nature being what it is, it should come as no shock that the next level of approved gambling in America is sports betting. States already have casinos, the lottery and other ways of separating money from the weak for their ravenous and bottomless coffers, so why not allow betting on sports contests?

Illustration on the new royal couple by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Meghan Markle, the bride who can't save the world

It's not easy being a royal bride in Old Blighty. Even keeping up with what to call everybody, and whom to curtsy to, and whom to expect a curtsy from, requires an immersion course in protocol. We can't even call Meghan Markle by her real name.

When illegals use pilfered Social Security numbers

Last week, a House Ways and Means subcommittee heard testimony from the Social Security Administration acting commissioner about the widespread and ongoing theft of Social Security numbers (SSNs)from the American public. Despite its pervasiveness, the illegal alien side of the problem is rarely raised by the media or in Congress. Illegal immigration in general wasn't mentioned at all during the May 17 hearing. And when the media does cover it, it's commonly used as a rallying cry to support mass amnesty — the claim being that "illegal aliens pay into the system" and, therefore, "are as American as you and me."

Ambassador Faith Whittlesey poses Nov. 16, 1985 in Geneva, Switzerland. Representative diplomatic official spokeswoman. (AP photo/Michele Euler)

Remembering Faith Ryan Whittlesey

Early in 1983, an attractive young woman I did not know grabbed my sleeve as I was leaving a meeting on Central America in the White House Cabinet Room. She stuck her card in my hand. It read, "Ambassador Faith Ryan Whittlesey, Assistant to the President for Public Liaison." On the back she had penned, "Call me! You need my help."

Illustration on examining the FISA court by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Questioning accountability on the secret court

Story after story comes out about the extent to which partisan politics played a key role in the Obama Department of Justice (DOJ), intelligence community and FBI during the 2016 presidential campaign. It's especially so in the context of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, and the more recent suggestions of a "mole" or "spy" inside the Trump campaign.

A flawed book still worth reading

Yascha Mounk is a good writer and a bright Harvard University political scientist. While this sounds impressive, one should bear in mind that politics is not really a science. Instead, it is a bubbling cauldron of individual and group prejudices, loyalties, traditions, sentiments, interests and cultural forces that defies a purely scientific analysis.

Tom Wolfe in the 1980's   Associated Press photo

A luminary of language fades away

On May 14 a star failed to come out. Tom Wolfe passed away that day. With his passing the conservative movement lost its greatest social critic, and America lost one of its greatest novelists. As a writer Tom was his own man. He died as he lived, on his terms, or at least as much on his terms as a man can have it.

Illustration on the effects of recent tax cuts by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why liberals hate the Trump tax cut

Despite liberal hysterics, Republicans' recent tax cut raised top earners' share of America's tax burden. This seemingly "squared circle" is simply due to a fact true before the legislation and even truer after: Middle- and upper-income earners shoulder the overwhelming tax load. Equally obvious: Even so large a share is not enough for an insatiable left.