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Andrea Noble

Andrea Noble was a crime and public safety reporter for The Washington Times.

Articles by Andrea Noble

A visitor to the National September 11 memorial, pans his phone while shooting video of One World Trade Center and surrounding buildings on the 13th anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York on Sept. 11, 2014. (Associated Press)

Man charged in plot to bomb Sept. 11 memorial in Kansas City

A Florida man who posed online as an Islamic State supporter was arrested Thursday and accused of providing instructions on how to make a bomb to a person he believed would detonate a device at a September 11 memorial event being held in Kansas City this weekend. Published September 11, 2015

Klayman salvages NSA lawsuit by adding plaintiff who used Verizon Business

The conservative lawyer challenging the National Security Agency's bulk phone data collection program is acting on a federal judge's suggestion to beef up his case against the government by adding another plaintiff who used the cell-phone network that the government has publicly admitted to tracking. Published September 9, 2015

In this image taken from a November 2012 video made available by Paula French, a well-known, protected lion known as Cecil strolls around in Hwange National Park, in Hwange, Zimbabwe. Zimbabwe's wildlife minister says extradition is being sought for Walter Palmer, the American dentist who killed Cecil. On Saturday, poachers killed Jericho, Cecil's brother. (Paula French via AP)

Cecil the lion extradition request from Zimbabwe likely going nowhere

Zimbabwe said it would seek extradition for Minnesota dentist Walter Palmer who is accused of illegally killing a beloved lion during a big game hunt in July. But as Mr. Palmer returned to work Tuesday, those extradition calls appear to have stalled. Published September 8, 2015

The Stingray, manufactured by Harris Corp. of Melbourne, Florida, is a cellular site simulator used for surveillance. (Associated Press/File)

Privacy concerns linger over use of cellphone tracking systems

The Justice Department's decision to require warrants before deployment of secret cellphone tracking systems has earned applause from privacy advocates as a first step in shining a light on the clandestine use of the technology by federal law enforcement. Published September 6, 2015

A protester yells at police outside the Ferguson, Mo., Police Department on Aug. 11, 2014, during a demonstration sparked by the fatal shooting of Michael Brown. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Justice Dept.'s Ferguson report shows police what not to do

A Department of Justice review of the law enforcement response to unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, last summer offers a playbook of what police should not do when responding to large-scale demonstrations. Published September 3, 2015

FILE - This is a Wednesday, May 27, 2015 file photo of U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch as she announces an indictment against nine FIFA officials and five corporate executives for racketeering, conspiracy and corruption at a news conference in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Federal prosecutors leading investigations of corruption in international football are to hold a joint news conference in FIFA's home city. On Sept. 14 in Zurich, U.S. attorney general Loretta Lynch and her counterpart from Switzerland, Michael Lauber, will give updates on their cases, Lauber's office said Tuesday Sept. 1, 2015.  (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

AG Lynch offers support amid police officers' killings

Attorney General Loretta Lynch on Wednesday offered a message of support to the law enforcement community, condemning the recent brutal killings of police officers in Texas and Illinois. Published September 2, 2015

This April 3, 2013, file photo shows bitcoin tokens in Sandy, Utah. (Associated Press/File)

Ex-Secret Service agent pleads guilty in Silk Road theft

A former Secret Service agent who was investigating the online drug trafficking website Silk Road has pleaded guilty to charges related to the theft of electronic currency from users of the site. Published September 1, 2015

Black Lives Matter protesters agitate at the front gate of the Minnesota State Fair during a protest Saturday. Some fear the protest movement may be promoting violence against police that contributed to a Houston deputy's slaying by a black man Friday. (Star Tribune via Associated Press)

Police want Obama to cool rhetoric blamed for violence

Law enforcement officials are frustrated by the Obama administration's failure to address the "anti-cop" rhetoric coming from the Black Lives Matter movement, and some fear it's promoting a climate of violence against police officers that may have contributed to Friday's fatal ambush of a Houston sheriff's deputy. Published August 31, 2015

In this Thursday, June 6, 2013, file photo, a sign stands outside the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

NSA phone-snooping program approved through November

The National Security Agency's phone-snooping program received federal court approval to continue through November, the last such renewal of the program allowable under legislation approved this year by Congress. Published August 28, 2015

FILE In this June 6, 2013 file photo, a sign stands outside the National Security Agency (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md.   The National Security Agency has begun winding down its collection and storage of American phone records this week after the Senate failed to agree on a path forward to change or extend the once-secret program ahead of its expiration at the end of the month.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File) **FILE**

Despite setback, lawsuit challenging NSA phone snooping still alive

A federal appeals court dealt a blow last week to a legal challenge of the National Security Agency's phone snooping program, ending a ban on data collection involving the plaintiffs and remanding the lawsuit to a lower court for further proceedings. Published August 28, 2015

FILE In this June 6, 2013 file photo, a sign stands outside the National Security Agency (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md.   The National Security Agency has begun winding down its collection and storage of American phone records this week after the Senate failed to agree on a path forward to change or extend the once-secret program ahead of its expiration at the end of the month.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File) **FILE**

Appeals court backs NSA phone-snooping, overturns Klayman victory

A federal appeals court backed the National Security Agency's phone-snooping program Friday ruling that Larry Klayman, the plaintiff and frequent court adversary to President Obama, never proved his calls were scooped up in the phone-records dragnet. Published August 28, 2015