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Ben Wolfgang

Ben Wolfgang

Ben Wolfgang covers the Pentagon, military and foreign affairs for The Washington Times.

Previously, he covered energy and the environment, Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign in 2016, and also spent two years as a White House correspondent during the Obama administration.

Before coming to The Times in 2011, Ben worked as political reporter at The Republican-Herald in Pottsville, Pa.

He can be reached at bwolfgang@washingtontimes.com.

Articles by Ben Wolfgang

Duncan ready to use waivers to evade NCLB

Education Secretary Arne Duncan had harsh words for Congress on Monday, calling it "dysfunctional" as he announced plans to bypass lawmakers and implement sweeping education reform through a waiver system for states. Published August 8, 2011

Secretary of Education Arne Duncan

Duncan scolds Congress, announces bypass plan

Education Secretary Arne Duncan had harsh words for Congress on Monday, calling it "dysfunctional" and announcing plans to bypass lawmakers and institute sweeping education reform through a waiver system for states. Published August 8, 2011

"I believe this is, without question, the tea party downgrade." -- Sen. John F. Kerry, Massachusetts Democrat, said on NBC's "Meet the Press." (Associated Press)

Democrats seek to pin credit downgrade on tea party

While continuing to cast doubt on the credibility of Standard & Poor's, several Democrats on Sunday said there is an even greater culprit in the downgrade of the nation's credit rating: the tea party. Published August 7, 2011

Budget chairman dubious of 'supercommittee'

Rep. Paul Ryan, chairman of the House Budget Committee, expressed skepticism Sunday morning that the so-called "supercommittee" charged with finding trillions of dollars in debt reduction will accomplish its goal. Published August 7, 2011

** FILE ** A Facebook page is seen on a computer.

Teachers can't 'friend' students in Missouri

Missouri students will soon be unfriended by their teachers. Under a new law that takes effect Aug. 28, teachers in the Show-Me State will no longer be able to "friend" students on popular social networking sites like Facebook. Instructors can still set up public pages or groups to post homework assignments or share resources, but individual friendships or communication will be illegal. Published August 4, 2011

UNVA students fear worst after raid

Students at the University of Northern Virginia say they are increasingly worried the school will close its doors forever after a raid by federal officials last week, but university officials said Wednesday they're open for business and cooperating with investigators. Published August 3, 2011

Schools scramble to stop cheating scandals

In the wake of school cheating scandals across the country, several states are racing to implement new testing protocols before classes resume. Published August 2, 2011

Duncan cites Pell Grants in 13.3% budget rise

With the attention of lawmakers focused squarely on reducing the nation's debt, Education Secretary Arne Duncan on Wednesday defended his department's request for a budget increase in fiscal 2012. Published July 27, 2011

** FILE ** Education Secretary Arne Duncan visited Friendship Collegiate Academy in Northeast on Wednesday to tout the federally funded Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs. (Associated Press)

Duncan seeks more education money in a belt-tightening time

With the attention of the lawmakers focused squarely on reducing the nation's debt, Education Secretary Arne Duncan on Wednesday defended his department's request for a budget increase in fiscal year 2012. Published July 27, 2011

14 states slow to ask for federal rewards for pre-K upgrades

Fourteen states are still undecided about applying for the Obama administration's $500 million Early Learning Challenge, a grant program that will reward states for improvements to prekindergarten education. Published July 24, 2011

Colleges raise tuition as much as 22 percent

Parents and students are bracing for a new round of sticker shock this fall as public colleges and universities are hiking prices again, this time to make up for massive cuts in state budgets. Published July 20, 2011

S. Korea leads way for paperless classroom

By 2015, the nation's schools will abandon traditional textbooks in favor of digital learning. Over the next four years, the nation's government will spend more than $2 billion to provide every student with a tablet and, in the process, become the first country in the world to go paperless in its schools. Published July 18, 2011

Sen. Richard J. Durbin, Illinois Democrat, says Congress should join an FBI investigation into whether News Corp. engaged in illegal activities in the United States.

Durbin wants wider hacking probe

The No. 2 Democrat in the Senate on Sunday called for a congressional investigation into the phone-hacking scandal that has rocked Rupert Murdoch's media behemoth News Corp. Published July 17, 2011

Markets watcher: 'Starting to get spooked' over delay in debt deal

While Congress and the White House still have more than two weeks to raise the debt ceiling before the Treasury Department's early August deadline, the financial markets are getting jittery, fearing they won't reach a deal in time. Published July 17, 2011

** FILE ** Sen. Lindsey Graham, South Carolina Republican (The Washington Times)

GOP wants amendment for balanced budget

With the debt-limit deadline only 16 days away, congressional Republicans on Sunday reiterated their support for a balanced-budget amendment as the answer to the nation's fiscal woes. Published July 17, 2011