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Jeff Mordock

Jeff Mordock is the Justice Department reporter for The Washington Times. A native of Newtown, Pennsylvania, he previously worked for Gannett and has won awards from both the Delaware Press Association and the Maryland Delaware D.C. Press Association. He is a graduate of George Washington University and can be reached at [email protected].

Articles by Jeff Mordock

Craft retailer Michaels pays $1.5M for shattering vases

Nationwide craft retailer Michaels Stores Inc. has agreed to pay $1.5 million to settle allegations it failed to make a timely report to the Consumer Product Safety Commission that large glass vases it sold shattered in customers' hands. Published February 13, 2018

Traffic along Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., streaks past the FBI headquarters building on Nov. 1, 2017. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Trump asks for $2B for new FBI headquarters

The Trump administration will ask Congress for $2.2 billion to build a new FBI headquarters this year, a Justice Department official said Monday. Published February 12, 2018

FBI Director Christopher Wray was warned he was close to "walking into contempt of Congress" after refusing to comment on numerous matters involving Peter Strzok. (Associated Press)

FBI 'needs to clean house,' former agents say

Former FBI agents say it may take a long time to wash away the stain of political-bias accusations lobbed against the bureau, which has long been viewed as the nation's premier law enforcement agency. Published February 6, 2018

In this photo taken Wednesday, March 22, 2017, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, R-Calif., gives reporters an update about the ongoing Russia investigation adding that President Donald Trump's campaign communications may have been "monitored" during the transition period as part of an "incidental collection," on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

Battle over Nunes memo tests Congress' ability to oversee FBI

Rep. Devin Nunes' fight to publicly release his memo detailing potential abuses of power at the FBI has turned into a major test for Congress, which is trying to prove it can pierce the veil of secrecy that Republicans say has been used to hide wrongdoing in the government's security agencies. Published February 1, 2018