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Judson Phillips

Judson Phillips

Judson Phillips is the founder of Tea Party Nation, one of the largest Tea Party Groups in the country and the number one national tea party site on the Internet.

A lawyer by profession, Judson has been involved in politics since his teens. “Ronald Reagan inspired me,” he says.

Judson became involved in the Tea Party movement in February 2009 after hearing Rick Santelli’s rant on CNBC.   “I heard there was going to be a Tea Party in Chicago inspired by Santelli, but didn’t know if anyone was doing a rally in Nashville where I was based.  Finally I emailed Michelle Malkin and asked her if there was a Tea Party in Nashville.  Malkin sent an email back saying, ‘No, why don’t you organize one?’  I did.”

The first Tea Party in Nashville was held late February 2009 which drew a crowd of about 600. Judson then organized the Tax Day Tea Party in Nashville, which drew over 10,000 people into downtown.   It was at this time that Tea Party Nation was formed.  Later that year, Judson decided to bring activists from across the country together, so he organized the first National Tea Party Convention in February 2010, which featured Alaska’s former Governor and Republican Vice Presidential Nominee, Sarah Palin as it’s keynote speaker.

He currently manages the Tea Party Nation website, writes several daily columns and is working on more projects than any one person should.  He is a frequent guest on cable and broadcast news shows, including on Fox, MSNBC, CNN and others.

Articles by Judson Phillips

Mr. Mueller's slow-cooked baloney stew (Illustration by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times)

Mueller, Giuliani and the bribery prosecution

Imagine for a moment that Rudy Giuliani, President Trump's attorney, went to witnesses in the Mueller special investigation and said, "The president will give you (fill in the blank), if you will give evidence and testify favorably for the president." Published July 6, 2018

Illustration on IRS harassment of Tea Party groups by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

John McCain, IRS, Henry Kerner, tea party, Judicial Watch

In the summer of 2014, the Congressional Tea Party caucus held a meeting on Capitol Hill and invited the leaders of about 20 Tea Party groups. The meeting was to discuss strategy. As the meeting wound down, the door to the meeting room opened and in came Sen. John McCain. Published June 27, 2018

Illustration: Tea Party by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

Is the Tea Party era over?

Nine years after the Tea Party movement roared into the American political scene, a lot of people are asking if the era of the Tea Party is over. Published June 5, 2018

Illustration on Federal contracting by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Protect the Pentagon’s cloud data

Alexa, how do we get competition? When Democrats rule D.C., you have to hand it to them. They know how to take care of their fellow Democrats. When Republicans rule D.C., they take care of the Democrats, too. Published May 10, 2018

A woman leaves flowers outside Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool, England, following the death of 23-month-old, Alfie Evans, Saturday April 28, 2018. Alfie Evans, the sick British toddler whose parents won support from Pope Francis during a protracted legal battle over his treatment, died early Saturday. He was 23 months old. (Peter Byrne/PA via AP)

How Britain has fallen

The world watched in shock and horror this past week at British police guarded a hospital in the UK. They were there to prevent a critically ill child from being removed and given the chance at life. Published April 30, 2018

Targeting Handguns Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Gun control would make Americans slaves

In Arizona, there is a special election to replace Rep. Trent Franks, who resigned earlier this year. Making special appearances to help the Democrat in that race are the kids from Parkland, Florida. Published April 23, 2018

In this Feb. 6, 2018, photo, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., joined at right by Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., talks with reporters at the Capitol in Washington. Ryan is backing McCarthy as his successor. In an interview with NBC's "Meet the Press," Ryan says McCarthy is "the right person." "I think Kevin is the right guy to step up," Ryan says in the interview that will air Sunday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Kevin McCarthy as House Speaker?

Paul Ryan shocked no one, at least no one who was paying attention, when last week he announced he would not seek re-election to the House of Representatives and would leave the Speaker's chair when his term is up in January. Published April 16, 2018

Steel, sugar subsidies hinder free trade

Chinese steel subsidies, and the world's grossly distorted metals market, became front-page news recently as President Trump announced new tariffs to level the playing field and salvage U.S. jobs. Published March 16, 2018

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., introduces a three-point plan on guns that's supported by the Democratic Caucus, during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, March 1, 2018. Schumer indicated he was surprised at remarks by President Donald Trump yesterday on gun safety in the wake of the student massacre in Parkland, Fla., last month. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The insanity of liberalism and government mandates

A wise man once defined insanity as trying the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. So, can we simply declare liberalism and worship of government to be a mental illness and be done with it? Published March 12, 2018

Then-IRS Commissioner John Koskinen testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 6, 2017, before the Senate Finance Committee. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen) ** FILE **

It is time to clean the IRS house

On Nov. 12, 2017, one of the best things that could have happened to Washington happened. The term of IRS Commissioner John Koskinen ended. With Mr. Koskinen's departure, President Trump has the opportunity to try and set things right. Published March 2, 2018

This Jan. 31, 2014 photo shows a losing game of Internet Texas Hold-Em being played on a computer screen in Atlantic City, N.J. On Feb. 20, 2015, New Jersey gambling regulators began allowing people to go online to sign up for a self-exclusion list for Internet gambling. They previously had to create an account with one of the online sites or sign up in person at a state office or racetrack. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

End Obama-era overreach of the Wire Act gambling policy

In 1961, Congress passed and the president signed a law called the Wire Act. The purpose of the Wire Act, which was proposed by then-Attorney General Robert Kennedy, was simple: to prevent the use of telephones and telegraphs in the use of gambling. Published February 20, 2018

In this June 21, 2017, photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller, the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, departs Capitol Hill following a closed-door meeting in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Trump-Mueller probe: Trump should remain silent

A number of years ago, I was in criminal court waiting on a client's case to be called. A pro-se defendant was pleading his case with the judge and saying things he should not. The judge advised him a couple of times not to talk. Finally, in exasperation, the judge looked down at him and said, "Sir, you have the right to remain silent but apparently not the ability." Published January 28, 2018

Social media companies ban conservative voices

The biggest media story of the year broke last week. Yet, millions of Americans never heard the story because the mainstream media "shadow banned" it. Published January 16, 2018