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Seth McLaughlin

Seth McLaughlin, a reporter on the Politics Desk, can be reached at smclaughlin@washingtontimes.com. Follow him on Twitter: @SethMcLaughlin1

Articles by Seth McLaughlin

This combination of 2017 file photos shows U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, left, and Sen. Luther Strange. On Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017, their campaigns confirmed the candidates in the race for Attorney General Jeff Sessions' former Senate seat will hold a debate on Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017. (Mickey Welsh/The Montgomery Advertiser via AP, Butch Dill, File)

Trump backs Strange in Alabama GOP Senate primary

President Trump is set to campaign Friday alongside Sen. Luther Strange, putting his own electoral winning streak on the line in next week's GOP primary runoff in Alabama. Published September 21, 2017

Gubernatorial candidates Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam (left) and Ed Gillespie have both contradicted the Trump administration, saying that Virginia doesn't have any sanctuary cities. Mr. Gillespie's latest attack ad says Mr. Northam opposed sanctuary legislation. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Gillespie attacks Northam in ad over sanctuary city stance

Both the Democrat and Republican in Virginia's governor's race say the state doesn't have any sanctuary cities — contradicting the Trump administration, which earlier this year fingered two counties as sanctuaries for refusing to fully cooperate with deportations. Published September 20, 2017

While both candidates for governor denounced white nationalists, Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, (top center) went a step further and criticized President Trump. "This denouncement is too little, too late," he said of the president. Mr. Gillespie (center bottom) was optimistic about Virginia's ability to tackle hate groups. "We have stared down racism, and Nazism and white supremacy before, and we will stare it down again," Mr. Gillespie said.
Combined Republican candidate for governor, Ed Gillespie, (bottom center) gestures during a news conference with his running mates, Lt. Gov. candidate Jill Vogel, left, and Attorney General candidate John Adams, right, Wednesday, June 14, 2017, in Richmond, Va. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Virginia Democratic candidate for governor, Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, with his wife Pam, left, son Weston, and daughter Aubrey celebrate his victory in the Democratic primary during an election party in Crystal City, Va., Tuesday, June 13, 2017. Northam faced former congressman Tom Perriello in Tuesday's primary. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Gillespie, Northam divided on Confederate statue issue

Democrat Ralph Northam and Republican Ed Gillespie split over what to do with Confederate monuments on display in Virginia in a debate Tuesday that provided voters across the Old Dominion a picture of the two gubernatorial hopefuls' different visions. Published September 19, 2017

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says she is thinking about sensors, drones and access roads for border security, but President Trump is sticking with his demand for a wall. (Associated Press)

Dreamer citizenship rights could swell immigrant number by 1.5 million

Granting citizenship rights to 700,000 Dreamers really means giving a foothold in the U.S. to perhaps 1.5 million other future immigrants, according to analysts who urged Congress to weigh the implications fully before pressing ahead with a mass legalization program. Published September 14, 2017

Virginia State Police stand outside the Virginia State Capitol as fog envelopes the area before inaugural ceremonies for Governor-elect Terry McAuliffe in Richmond, Va., Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Democratic PAC looks to flip statehouses, starting with Virginia in 2017

A political action committee launched by veterans of the Obama White House and business allies said Wednesday their push to give Democrats more say over redistricting in 2021 starts this fall with the legislative races in Virginia, where they hope to flip control of the House of Delegates. Published September 6, 2017

In this Aug. 15, 2017, file photo, Sen. Luther Strange speaks to media after forcing a runoff against former Chief Justice Roy Moore in Homewood, Ala. (AP Photo/Butch Dill, File)

Sen. Luther Strange joins Trump's calls for scrapping legislative filibuster

Sen. Luther Strange of Alabama said Tuesday he supports President Trump's desire for congressional leaders to end the legislative filibuster, arguing it must be done to get around "obstructionist tactics by Democrats" and advance the White House's "America First" agenda through the upper chamber on a simple majority vote. Published September 5, 2017