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Newark Mayor Ras Baraka, left, listens to a reporters question while sitting with Kareem Adeem, the city's deputy director of water and sewer utilities, right, during a news conference talking about levels of lead in the city's tap water, Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, in Newark, N.J. Baraka said Thursday his administration is taking multiple steps to address the high levels caused by aging lead water lines. Meanwhile, a lawsuit claims the city hasn't taken adequate precautions and has misled residents. Between 15,000 and 18,000 homes are estimated to have the lead lines. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Newark Mayor Ras Baraka, left, listens to a reporters question while sitting with Kareem Adeem, the city's deputy director of water and sewer utilities, right, during a news conference talking about levels of lead in the city's tap water, Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, in Newark, N.J. Baraka said Thursday his administration is taking multiple steps to address the high levels caused by aging lead water lines. Meanwhile, a lawsuit claims the city hasn't taken adequate precautions and has misled residents. Between 15,000 and 18,000 homes are estimated to have the lead lines. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

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