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The cost of demonizing the police

- The Washington Times

It was reported last week that in New York City alone some 272 officers have put in for retirement in the last month and that most of them are among the most experienced in the department.

Chief of Space Operations at US Space Force Gen. John Raymond, left, and Chief Master Sgt. Roger Towberman, right, hold the United States Space Force flag as President Donald Trump walks past it in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, May 15, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Regaining the lead in space

On June 30, just a few minutes shy of 4 p.m., the U.S. Space Force launched its third Global Positioning Satellite Block III (GPS III) satellite into orbit. The launch went unnoticed by the vast majority of Americans, but it was another unmistakable sign that, after years of decline, the United States is on a path to retake the lead in all aspects of space operations.

Frederick Douglass Portrait by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

What ex-slave Frederick Douglass thought of the Founding Fathers

I think that it is appropriate on this Fourth of July to ask someone who had actually been a slave to speak on their behalf. So I invoke an 1852 speech by the great civil rights leader Frederick Douglass titled, “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?”

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Shortsighted 'defund' movement

I do not believe I have ever heard a more insane idea than the call to defund the police. Imagine drunk drivers speeding down your street, where children walk and play. Imagine no one obeying traffic signals. Imagine cars and motorcycles going over 100 miles an hour on the freeways. Imagine your house is on fire and the firefighters cannot get to the fire hydrant because of illegally parked cars. Imagine listening to or watching a man beating a woman -- and having no one to call for help. Imagine having no one to investigate a theft, rape, murder or drive-by shooting. That is what we will reap if we defund the police. If this is what the American people want, there is an easier way: Just get rid of all the laws.

Contradictory messages

As a communication scholar, I believe that Sen. Chris Murphy, Connecticut Democrat, hit the nail on the head at Tuesday's Senate coronavirus hearing. He explained why slowing the spread of COVID-19 is in large part a rhetorical problem. As Mr. Murphy noted, we have "two parallel messaging operations" leading to confusion and a lack of compliance with virus-prevention guidelines.

President Abraham Lincoln and Russian Tsar Alexander II. (Sponsored)

Happy U.S. Independence Day Wishes from Russia

For many open-minded Americans and Russians it has become a tradition to congratulate each other on their independence days, which are June 12 for Russia and July 4 for America.

Artwork stands on a wall Sunday, June 28, 2020, in Seattle, representing the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis, in an area where several streets are blocked off in what has been named the Capitol Hill Occupied Protest zone. Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan met with demonstrators Friday after some lay in the street or sat on barricades to thwart the city's effort to dismantle the protest zone that has drawn scorn from President Donald Trump and a lawsuit from nearby businesses. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Jenny Durkan, decrying socialist lawlessness, now reaps what she sows

- The Washington Times

Seattle's Jenny Durkan, the Democrat who let thugs take over city streets has accused City Council socialist Kshama Sawant of inciting behavior that led to a swarming of demonstrators inside City Hall and at Durkan's own home. And she wants an investigation; for Sawant to possibly be expelled. This is about as tit-for-tat as it gets.

Biden couldn't order mask wearing

The president has no authority to require the general public to wear masks ("Joe Biden: I would insist anyone in public wear a mask," Web, June 26). As sovereign entities that both predated and retained broad powers under the U.S. Constitution, only the individual states possess inherent "police powers" to protect their inhabitants' health, safety and welfare. In contrast, federal authorities must be expressly enumerated in the Constitution.