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Members of the Oakland Raiders take a knee while others stand during the national anthem. (Associated Press)

Once upon a knee at the old ball game

- The Washington Times

There’s a lunatic in Asia credibly threatening the world with a hydrogen bomb. Congress can’t pull itself together to do anything. But enough of that. We’re all obsessed now with what a few tubby athletes think about the flag, the national anthem and the country others have shed blood and lives to defend and protect.

Illustration on the broken ideology of Socialism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

If oppression could inspire happiness

It is a fair bet that Sen. Bernie Sanders (and most of his followers), unlike tens of millions of others, never read George Orwell’s “Animal Farm” or Friedrich von Hayek’s “The Road to Serfdom.” Why do so many embrace a system — socialism — that has always failed, whether it was a form of state socialism or the various utopian communities started in the United States and Europe over the last couple of hundred years?

This Aug. 21, 2017, file photo shows members of the Cleveland Browns kneeling during the national anthem before an NFL preseason football game between the New York Giants and the Cleveland Browns in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Ron Schwane, file)

NFL politics, a test for the media — and a solution

- The Washington Times

If NFL players have a right to on-field free expressions of speech, then that means pro-life players can take a knee during the playing of the national anthem to show solidarity with all the babies who could have been, save for America’s legal rubber-stamp of abortion.

Democrat Thumb on the Scale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fuzzy polls that trash Trump

- The Washington Times

How soon they forget. Heartened by a stream of poll data suggesting that the public is less than enamored with his performance as president, Donald Trump’s critics who’ve been taken in by polls before seem to think they have the man on the ropes.

Illustration on the Vietnam War     The Washington Times

The Vietnam War revisited

Filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick have performed a vital public service in making their documentary “The Vietnam War” for the Public Broadcasting Service. Given the division that war caused in America, it is a pretty fair chronicling of the way things were a half-century ago. The film brought back a lot of mostly bad memories to people of my generation.

The Al Gore Twister Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Alarmism in climate reporting

In the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, many members of the media and the political left have been quick to pin the blame for these storms on climate change. While there is no question that the hurricanes have wreaked havoc across many communities, including in my home state of Texas, these severe storms are not indicative of a climate trend — despite what the clickbait masters would have us believe.

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen closes her notebook after answering questions during a news conference following the Federal Open Market Committee meeting in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The Federal Reserve’s handwringing over low inflation

The Federal Reserve has been absolutely flummoxed that inflation has stayed so low for so long. Gasoline prices and headline inflation may be getting a temporary jolt from Harvey, but core inflation — consumer prices less energy and food costs — remains well below the Fed’s official target of 2 percent.

Illustration on the development of technology and political campaigning by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Turning up the heat on America’s electioneering

Last year’s election signaled a change in American politics equal to that of the 1960s. The channel for this change was the medium — or rather, media — through which politics now flows. This change in media has brought an evolution in America’s method of communication, and transformed politics as well. The nation can extol it or lament it, but cannot escape it.

In this Sept. 22, 2017, photo President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Huntsville, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

A tax cut for all Americans

When you hear the phrase “corporate tax cut,” what do you picture? Middle-class workers, or Uncle Moneybags, the character from the Monopoly board game?

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One at Morristown Municipal airport, Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Critics call Trump ‘self-interested’ like it’s a bad thing

- The Washington Times

As a businessman, a builder and a real estate tycoon in the most fiercely competitive real estate market on the planet, President Trump has spent his entire life exercising his own considerable self-interest. He built a huge and admirable fortune trying to make a buck for himself.

Illustration on the rise of materialism and anti-religious bigotry on Capitol Hill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hate, Bernie style

Two remarkable things unfolded last week. The Democrats openly embraced socialism in the form of single-payer health care. And they announced a secular, anti-Christian test for public office. The two go together like Abbott and Costello. Or better yet, since this is far from funny, Marx and Lenin.

Illustration on CIA use of drones by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The CIA’s drones fly into a storm

The Central Intelligence Agency’s authority to use lethal force is usually discussed only in the quietest corners of the intelligence community. These authorities are usually implemented pursuant to carefully-prescribed top-secret “presidential determinations” that authorize specific actions.

Justin Kandor Causing Trouble in New Hampshire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Some New Hampshire candor about Jason Kander

Let America Vote founder Jason Kander is a smirking menace. The former Missouri secretary of state wants to come to New Hampshire, cast aspersions on our elections, and use his wokeness as a springboard to bigger things.

Related Articles

In this July 27, 2017, file photo, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., left, walks onstage as Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., center, points to him while Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., watches as they speak to reporters at the Capitol as the Republican-controlled Senate was unable to fulfill its political promise to repeal and replace "Obamacare" because of opposition and wavering within the GOP ranks. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

Obamacare repeal is dead

- The Washington Times

Gee, what a surprise, this headline from The Washington Post: "Senate GOP effort to unwind the ACA collapses Monday." At this point, Americans are starting to catch on -- Republicans aren't actually going to repeal Obamacare. Never.

Trying to move forward by looking backward

Few things are more changeable than the past: Each new generation of revisionist historians and social activists reinterprets -- and, sometimes, shamelessly distorts -- it. The result is an ever-changing mythology and, in the case of the United States, a constantly morphing "American Dream" subjected to endless re-analysis.

Once more, to protect America

Sometimes, the third time's the charm. At other times, it's three strikes and you're out. President Trump is testing those bits of ancient wisdom by implementing restrictions on travel to the United States from violence-prone nations. Though the nation has been free from recent terror attacks, for which we all give thanks, common sense dictates sober efforts to screen out evildoers before they reach these shores.

Individuality, disrespect different

Thank God we all do not share the same beliefs; I believe our diversity of thought is exactly what our Founding Fathers intended. What I am not thankful for, however, is the ignorance which is bountiful in our great nation ("Trump's call for boycott of NFL reignites furor over players' national anthem protests," Web, Sept. 24). Our flag does not represent only our president. It represents much, much more. It represents you and me and all presidents past and future. It represents the men who died defending our freedom. It represents our children, nieces and nephews who were born into a nation with liberties unparalleled by any country.

Dave Matthews delivers a speech at the start of the show after performing a solo song Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017, in Charlottesville, Va. Thousands of people have packed a stadium for a concert intended to raise money for charity and promote unity in the aftermath of this summer's white nationalist rallies. Matthews, whose band got its start in the Virginia college town, hosted the Sunday show. (Zack Wajsgras/The Daily Progress/The Daily Progress via AP)

The threat to free speech

Readin', writin' and 'rithmetic have been the traditional elements of a fundamental education. Recently, if the front pages of the newspapers are an accurate reflection of the menu on many campuses, rant and rage have been added to the three r's to make five. It's clear that elemental civics should be added as well.