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Senator Al Franken   Associated Press photo

Back to the future with Franken

- The Washington Times

It’s already begun. Liberal activists and pundits are arguing that Minnesota Sen. Al Franken’s documented piggishness toward women should be discounted, forgiven or perhaps even ignored given the fact that he is, well, one of them.

Hillary and Bill Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Who knew so much testosterone rides the capital breeze?

- The Washington Times

These are not happy times for anybody. You can’t keep up with the serial sexual offenders without a scorecard, and the list grows longer every day and all the claims won’t fit on one scorecard. Seekers of cash settlements are advised to not take checks, and hurry to the bank and get in line before the cash runs out.

No choice for China

If China doesn’t decide to intervene and essentially “denuclearize” North Korea — and soon — the Pacific region will “nuclearize” itself, in reaction to China’s inaction and the growing North Korean nuclear threat.

Trump Trade Policies Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump’s unwise economic nationalism

At the recent Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit, Presidents Trump and Xi Jinping offered competing and disturbing visions of a new international economic order.

Illustration on volunteerism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Crowding out compassion

Anyone who has ever seen footage of a “Black Friday” stampede knows the holiday season can bring out the worst in people. So it’s important to remember that it can also bring out the best — and to realize that government can inadvertently dampen our more compassionate impulses.

An ethanol plant stands next to a cornfield near Nevada, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File) **FILE**

Corn grows all too well in the swamp

Corn has taken root in the swamp that surrounds Congress. It has meant big bucks for Big Corn, but most everyone else is paying the price.

Conflict Between Oil Producers in Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perils of Saudi reform

In a dizzying sequence of events, Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman took a series of moves that will strengthen his status as heir to the throne and the face of his country’s future. These included a roundup of prominent royals, businessmen, and officials and the arrest of a major international Saudi businessman. At the same time, Saudi defense systems intercepted a missile fired at Riyadh from Yemen, the Lebanese prime minister resigned his post during a visit to Saudi Arabia, and another powerful Saudi prince died in a helicopter crash.

Illustration on new GOP wisdom on taxes by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Stupid Party gets smart

Republicans have long been known as “the stupid party.” They do stupid things, like waiting until mid-November to pass a must-pass tax cut that should have been done by April.

In this July 12, 2017 photo, Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn. arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington. The normally sleepy Senate Ethics Committee hasn't had a major case since 2011, but it could be deciding next year on the fate of three senators _ including two facing allegations of inappropriate sexual behavior. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A nation of moral geldings

Question: If the woman in the photo of Al Franken (where he’s groping her while she sleeps) would have given “consent,” then would this be right and good? If morality is really nothing more than mutual “consent” and Sen. Franken could prove that she said this was okay to do while she lay sleeping, he would have nothing — absolutely nothing — to be “ashamed” of. Right?

Illustration on U.S./Azerbaijan cooperation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Azerbaijan, an American partner

Azerbaijan has long been a partner of the United States. In the 26 years since we gained our independence, Azerbaijan has sought friendly relations with the United States. Formal bilateral relations were established with the sagacious efforts and diligence of the late president of Azerbaijan Heydar Aliyev and his American counterparts: U.S. Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton.

Al Franken and Leeanne Tweeden

Gropergate! The halls of Congress under siege!

- The Washington Times

When I was a young reporter on a certain newspaper in the South, fresh on a new job, I took a fancy to a sweet and pretty young woman (that’s how we talked in those days) working on what newspapers quaintly called “the Society pages.”

Why Trump should arm Ukraine

President Trump has often expressed his desire to build a better, more positive relationship with Russia. However, as Secretary of State Tillerson has said, improved bilateral relations will not be possible without ending Russia’s aggression against Ukraine.

Illustration on the restoration of the Alamo by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Restoring, reinforcing and remembering the Alamo

As a native Texan, as a veteran, and as Texas land commissioner, it is my solemn duty and my great honor to be the caretaker of the Alamo. Who we are as Texans started there and who we can be as Texans and Americans still lives there.

Illustration of George Papadopoulos by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The Russian shadow

Thank goodness we live in a country where the people who represent us in Congress have the power to investigate and grill federal officials to root out wrongdoing in our government.

Related Articles

Former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore leaves after he speaks at a church revival, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017, in Jackson, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

The dilemma in Alabama

"You can't beat Somebody with Nobody" is one of the first rules of politics, but occasionally Somebody is exposed as a wolf in borrowed clothes and Nobody wins by default. Nobody in Alabama is a man named Doug Jones, and a fortnight ago his chances of defeating Roy Moore were somewhere between Slim and None. And then Slim unexpectedly left town.

Give Greece due for WWII victory

Victor Davis Hanson's "Remembering Stalingrad 75 years later" (Web, Nov. 7) is an excellent narrative about a critical event in history. However, it leaves the impression that Germany's dividing its army between Stalingrad and the Russian oil fields caused its defeat and marked the turning point in World War II. Other historians differ.

Rebuild U.S. military now

The Virginia election loss of Ed Gillespie showed voter frustration with our do-nothing Congress, not frustration with the hard-working President Donald Trump, who is making America great again. The Virginia GOP must rebuild with the president's help and elect Corey Stewart for senator in 2018. He is the best hope Republicans have to drain the swamp of Northern Virginia and represent true conservative values.

A savvy guide to investing, geared toward the young

This is a book about investing, aimed primarily at potential young investors -- although investors of all ages can benefit from it -- written by a longtime and notably successful investor.

Former Vice President Joe Biden answers a question about gun control during an NBC "Today" appearance, Nov. 14, 2017. (Image: NBC, "Today" screenshot)

Roy Moore? How about Joe Biden

- The Washington Times

If Roy Moore has a seedy past when it comes to sexual improprieties with underage and young girls -- at least, allegedly -- and should therefore drop his aspirations for higher political office, then so, too, should Joe Biden.

In this Feb. 27, 2017, file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., accompanied by House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., speaks to reporters outside the White House in Washington, following their meeting with President Donald Trump inside. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) ** FILE **

Mark Levin to Mitch McConnell, Paul Ryan: 'Resign'

- The Washington Times

Conservative radio star Mark Levin sent a blunt rebuke Republican leadership's way, calling on Sen. Mitch McConnell and Rep. Paul Ryan to step away from their offices and resign. It's not going to happen, of course. But plenty in conservative camps would back that call nevertheless.

In this Oct. 17, 2017, file photo, Army soldiers hone their long-distance marksmanship skills as they train at Fort Benning in Columbus, Ga. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Filling military quotas with the mentally ill

The Army very quietly announced in August that it will lift a ban on waivers allowing people with a history of mental health issues, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, to join their ranks. Even in normal times this should concern you greatly, let alone when the world appears to be preparing for war.

FILE - In this Feb. 27, 2017 file photo, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. meet with reporters outside the White House in Washington. Congress is still trying to send President Donald Trump his first unqualified legislative triumph, nearly six months after Republicans grabbed full control of Washington. Now, lawmakers are returning from their July 4 recess with an added objective _ averting some full-blown political disasters.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File) **FILE**

Tax reform: How the GOP can win big

The GOP needs the right kind of win, not a simple "check-the-box" win or a perfunctory "we-finally-did-something" win. No, the GOP needs the kind of win that will give Americans the confidence that Republicans should remain in control of Washington after next year's elections.

Illustration on the campaign against glyphosphate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forcing taxpayers to fund anti-chemical activism

It's bad enough when tax-exempt foundations and activist groups use junk science and scare campaigns to promote excessive regulations and set the stage for class action lawsuits against perfectly good products. It's intolerable when our tax dollars directly finance U.S. and European Union government agencies that do likewise.

Illustration on the antiquated Communucations Act of 1934 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why America needs an updated Communications Act

Congress needs to update the Communications Act of 1934. In 2014, Republican Reps. Fred Upton and Greg Walden started a congressional review process, using the #CommActUpdate handle. Now almost four years later, it's time for Congress to get the job done by overhauling the statute in a way that constrains the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) authority to substitute burdensome bureaucratic mandates for marketplace freedom.

Illustration on the criminalization of government agencies by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The criminalization of America's government agencies

The criminalization of government agencies by the Obama administration was far more extensive than previously realized. The Uranium One deal is a prime example of how key government agencies have been criminalized.

Massachusetts members of the electoral college are sworn in at the Statehouse in Boston, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016. The eleven members have officially cast their votes for Democrat presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

When oversight becomes overreach

Donald Trump was elected with an electoral vote victory, despite a popular vote defeat. How ironic, then, that he would institute a federal fraud commission that is helping to undermine the principles upon which the Electoral College was founded.

Democrats Miss the Tax Cut Ride Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The left is right to fear Trump's tax cuts

Liberals fear President Trump's tax cuts more than any of his policies. This explains the left's virulent opposition and that it will only increase as tax cuts approach enactment. The reason: Tax cuts offer Mr. Trump and Republicans greater political and economic potential than any other proposal.

Illustration on nostalgia for Communism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Came the revolution

My political orientation has evolved slowly over decades. With one exception: I became anti-Soviet and anti-Communist overnight. More quickly than that, actually.

Target of the Democrats Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Roy Moore and the migraine for Republicans

It has long been my conviction that Democrats are the more adept pols, the most tireless pols, the most political pols. I have said that their political libido is that of a nymphomaniac. By that I mean to compliment them, at least to compliment their political skills. The political libido of the Republicans is by comparison the political libido of a Victorian lady, complete with white gloves and parasol.

FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington, at sunset. The Supreme Court is making new legal filings available online starting Monday, years behind the rest of the federal court system. Its a big step forward for an institution that has sometimes had just a glancing familiarity with technology. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

California and the Constitution

There's a lot about the law and the Constitution that California does not understand, particularly the First Amendment. The U.S. Supreme Court, perhaps willing to offer the needed tutorial in the law, has agreed to hear a legal challenge to a California law requiring private pro-life pregnancy counseling centers to tell their clients that the state will provide an abortion instead.