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Mike Pompeo. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Democratic terror of a miracle in North Korea

- The Washington Times

Trying to spark a new romance, or even arrange a weekend tryst, is not always easy. It’s impossible with the help of spectators eager to throw things, not orange blossoms but sticks and stones with sharp edges. But that’s how Washington tries to conduct diplomacy, circa 2018.

Illustration on Taiwan's contributions to world health by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Taiwan must be seated at the World Health Assembly

The constitution of the World Health Organization (WHO) notes that “the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social condition.” Yet WHO withheld, as last year, an invitation for Taiwan’s participation in May as an observer in the annual World Health Assembly (WHA) in Geneva, Switzerland.

House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway, R-Texas, joined at left by Vice Chairman Glenn Thompson, R-Pa., announces the new farm bill, officially known as the 2018 Agriculture and Nutrition Act, at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 12, 2018. The bulk of the bill's spending goes toward funding SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Faith leaders skew Bible to oppose SNAP reform

- The Washington Times

Faith leaders are coming out in full force to oppose the Republican-sponsored Farm Bill released in the House that imposes stricter work requirements on those receiving food stamps. Do not be fooled by their so-called Christian arguments in opposition of this bill. Their arguments are neither Christian nor common sense.

The Birth of a New Economic Recovery Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The optimists may be right

In January, Wall Street investors were optimistic tax cuts would sustain economic growth and the Trump bull market. As spring arrives, the world has proven decidedly more uncertain.

Illustration on the costs of Elon Musk's Space X by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The crony capitalist in free market clothing

You might imagine that pro-capitalism, free-market folk like me would just love what Elon Musk has done in the past couple of decades but you’d be wrong. I enjoy his entrepreneurial spirit and success, founding company (zip2) after company (PayPal) after company (The Boring Co.) and turning them into properties worth billions and then moving along to the next new thing. Props and kudos to this son of South Africa and prototype for “Iron Man.” You got those parts right.

William Wachtel holds up a mock Social Security card of President-elect Donald Trump as he speaks to members of the media following a meeting with Trump at Trump Tower in New York, Monday, Jan. 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A fresh start for a beleaguered agency

It seemed like it would never happen. But after more than five years, a formal nomination of a Social Security commissioner will finally be considered by the U.S. Senate. This is a long overdue development. The delay of a nomination, however, pales compared to the wait a million Americans continue to endure for a hearing that will decide if they will receive the Social Security disability benefits they earned while working.

President Donald Trump gestures during a news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Trump's private Mar-a-Lago club, Wednesday, April 18, 2018, in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump and the attorney-client privilege

A few weeks ago, President Trump was an outwardly happy man because of the utterance of one solitary word from the lips of special counsel Robert Mueller to one of Mr. Trump’s lawyers. The word that thrilled the president and his legal team was “subject.”

The Tarmac Meeting Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Clintons and the rule of law

Former Obama Attorney General Loretta Lynch, in a NBC interview last Monday, reopened a can of worms. In the interview, Ms. Lynch defended her private meeting with Bill Clinton back on June 27, 2016.

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Illustration on John Bolton by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

America in good hands

Former U.N. Ambassador John Bolton is exceptionally qualified to serve as President Trump's National Security Adviser, and I fully support his selection. He has the right mix of expertise on the complex international security threats we face, the leadership experience to coordinate input from multiple federal departments and agencies involved in our national security policy and the strong communication skills to be a spokesman for the president on critical security matters.

Syria Strike Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Strike on Syria--who really won

President Trump and his national security team deserve high praise for their recent action in attacking Syrian chemical weapons facilities. They did everything right. Not only was it well-justified and timely, the president and his team did not rush into an attack but waited several days to evaluate the intelligence from various sources, develop attack options that met the president's specific objective, and form a coalition with key allies Great Britain and France for the strike.

In this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, left, and Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., both members of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, GOP strategy session at the Capitol in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

A new Speaker

Paul Ryan shocked no one, at least no one who was paying attention, when last week he announced he would not seek re-election to the House of Representatives and would leave the Speaker's chair when his term is up in January.

Non-Dairy Cow Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Non-dairy milk, the next great oxymoron

Last week, the House of Representatives introduced its much-anticipated 2018 farm bill — and not a moment too soon. While the rest of the nation clawed its way to pre-recession productivity, the farm economy has suffered a prolonged five-year contraction.

Then-FBI Director Robert Mueller listens as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 13, 2013, as the House Judiciary Committee held an oversight hearing on the FBI. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

When anything goes

If Robert Mueller ever needs work, we would be happy to commend him to a school of journalism looking for a dean.

'Get-Trump' mentality widespread

Disdain for President Trump is worn as a badge of honor. It seems you can never display contempt for him too prominently. Mr. Trump was the Democrats' darling when his novel candidacy was the human wrecking ball in the Republican primary — and his nomination would have been God-sent if one were gullible enough to believe in God.

Tax could help smokers quit

As a cardiologist, I am pleased to see that the D.C. Council is considering raising the tax on cigarettes ("D.C. Council looks at adding $2 to cigarette packs sold in District," Web, April 9). Tobacco use is rampant in the District and is a leading cause of heart disease, stroke and death. Every day I treat patients who could have prevented their heart attack, stroke or other illness simply by never starting to use tobacco or by quitting.

'A commanding presence with a resolute manner'

At 49, writes John Greenya, Judge Neil Gorsuch had "a commanding presence with a resolute manner" as he testified before the committee. As Fox News' Charles Krauthammer put it, "This guy is out of central casting. This is a Gary Cooper character. Attacking him would be a losing proposition."

In this Feb. 6, 2018, photo, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., joined at right by Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., talks with reporters at the Capitol in Washington. Ryan is backing McCarthy as his successor. In an interview with NBC's "Meet the Press," Ryan says McCarthy is "the right person." "I think Kevin is the right guy to step up," Ryan says in the interview that will air Sunday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

A new Speaker

Paul Ryan shocked no one, at least no one who was paying attention, when last week he announced he would not seek re-election to the House of Representatives and would leave the Speaker's chair when his term is up in January.

Former FBI director James B. Comey Mr. Comey is on a book tour, with multiple media interviews, to promote, "Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership," an account of his time in the Trump administration. (Associated Press)

James Comey thinks it's normal to smash old cell phones with a hammer

- The Washington Times

James Comey thinks it's pretty normal for people to destroy their cell phones when they are done using them because "if it's resold, someone doesn't end up with your information." Um... how, exactly, does one sell a destroyed cell phone? Perhaps Comey meant that he thinks it's common for people to destroy their cell phones to ensure that they are not resold.

This Friday, June 30, 2017, file photo shows a librarian holding an expensive rare law book at the University of Virginia School of Law rare books collection in Charlottesville, Va. Nearly 200 years ago, Thomas Jefferson came up with a legal reading list for lawyers. Now, the University of Virginia is putting those books online. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Thomas Jefferson statue smearing as 'Racist + Rapist' despicable and revisionist

- The Washington Times

Thomas Jefferson was a complicated guy. So smearing his statue, as vandals just did, with the red painted words of "Racist + Rapist" at the University of Virginia, the college he actually founded, fails to take into account the complicated twists and turns of his beliefs, the pragmatic nature of his political leanings, the ultimate efforts he made to ban slavery from a significant portion of America.

Then-FBI Director James Comey testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, May 3, 2017. Mr. Comey is blasting President Donald Trump as unethical and "untethered to truth" and his leadership of the country as "ego driven and about personal loyalty." Comey's comments come in a new book in which he casts Trump as a mafia boss-like figure who sought to blur the line between law enforcement and politics and tried to pressure him regarding the investigation into Russian election interference. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

'Slimeball' versus Stormy Daniels

- The Washington Times

Call it a pole-dancing standoff between the Siren Stripper and the Leakin' Lyin' Nasty Giraffe, code-named "Slimeball" by the highest levels of the United States government.

This Sept. 28, 2017, file photo shows Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch speaking at the 50th anniversary of the Fund for America Studies luncheon at the Trump Hotel in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

A black-robed counterrevolution

Federal judges sit on the bench for life and can either uphold the law or rule like tyrants. This puts judicial appointments right near the top of the most important things a president can do.

Illustration on ACLU perception of constitutional rights by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Just a shadow of the old ACLU

Remember when the American Civil Liberties Union was a staunch defender of First Amendment rights? The ACLU even defended the right of American Nazis to march in Skokie, Ill., the home of thousands of Holocaust survivors. Well, nowadays the ACLU is but a shadow of its former self, as it increasingly succumbs to the left's latest siren songs.

Illustration on the hazards of being a Chinese-language reporter with VOA by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The most hazardous job in the federal government

Earlier this year, dozens of relatives of five reporters of the Uyghur Service, Radio Free Asia (RFA), were detained by the Chinese government in China's Xinjiang region. The medieval type of practice was clearly a powerful means of retaliation against the reporters. Such long-standing practice promised severe punishment to those who dared to challenge the regime by holding their loved ones hostage.

Chart to accompany Moore article of April 16, 2018.

The trillion dollar myth

There is an old saying that you can't teach an old dog new tricks, and we've learned that again with the Congressional Budget Office and its latest highly misleading fiscal forecast.