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Illustration on merit-based immigration policy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump’s merit-based immigration system

For decades, the American people have been begging and pleading with our elected officials for an immigration system that is lawful and that serves our national interest.

Tax Cut Balloons Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Lasting and transformative tax relief

A staggering 13 billion dollars. More than the value of the entire “Star Wars” franchise. That’s the minimum amount taxpayers will save under the recently-passed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act now that lawmakers have made compliance with the U.S. tax code less of a chore. Taxpayers will now also save an estimated 210 million hours of time they used to squander on the clumsy 1040 “long form.” Lighter paperwork burdens like these will begin showing up in other portions of the tax code for businesses and individuals as the new law is implemented.

Chart to accompany Moore article of Jan. 22, 2018.

The Democrats’ fiscal trap

With all the talk about a possible government shutdown due to an impasse on immigration reform, no one seems to be paying attention to a story of even bigger long-term consequence. Congress is preparing a two-year budget that blows past bipartisan spending caps to the tune of $216 billion through 2019. These are the latest stunning tallies from an analysis by Congressional Quarterly. (See chart).

Former President Richard Nixon. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

An Olympian break in the war between the words

- The Washington Times

A few Ping-Pong balls broke the Cold War ice around China a generation ago, following Richard Nixon’s stunning trip to Beijing (when it was still called Peiping), and soon the United States and China were on their way to normal diplomatic relations.

Illustration on the recent nuclear alarm in Hawaii by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Hawaii error and liberal hysteria

Murphy’s Law was written to describe how governments work. It was proved yet again on January 13 when an employee of the Hawaii Emergency Management System sent a cellphone alert that said, “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.” The alert was false but until it was corrected almost 40 minutes later it terrified millions of residents and tourists.

Illustration on protecting aborted babies delivered alive by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Giving the smallest patients equal protection under the law

Doctors today routinely diagnose and treat a myriad of conditions, illnesses and diseases suffered by society’s littlest patients — unborn babies and newborns — significantly enhancing both their health and longevity.

Illustration on GOP political dangers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When politicians exploit inequality

For Republicans, it’s dangerous to focus on the moment — accusations that President Trump is a racist, DACA and avoiding government shutdowns — but the more enduring threat to the GOP’s grip on power are charges of insensitivity about inequality.

Illustration on unintended Democrat sabotage of DACA legislation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The fate of the Dreamers

Donald Trump probably shouldn’t have suggested — not in public, at least — that Haiti and other nations that send refugees and immigrants to the United States are “s-holes.” It’s not only demeaning; it adds insult to injury.

Rep. John Culberson, Texas Republican, said, "The time is right" to consider a return to earmarks. He is pushing for a test run so Congress can prove it can be responsible. (Associated Press/File)

The trouble with earmarks

Nearly a year after President Trump was sworn into office on a campaign pledge to “drain the swamp,” he now wants Congress to reopen the spending spigots again.

Illustration on high tech's deleterious effects on commerce by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Big Tech chameleon

Twenty years ago, no one had heard of either Facebook or Google, neither of which existed yet. For that matter, no one knew much about social media or search engines in general.

"I'm not a racist. I'm the least racist person you will ever interview," said President Trump told reporters as he met with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, California Republican (left). The furor grew out of an immigration discussion at the White House on Thursday where Mr. Trump allegedly made vulgar comments. (Associated Press)

‘Trump’s a racist’ — Marcia, Marcia, Marcia

- The Washington Times

There comes a point when calling a spade a spatula becomes a bit worn and wearying and the public starts to catch on and actually notice and say, hey, that’s a spatula, not a spade. In other words: People start to doubt the message is actually true.

Taxpayer Money Lost in  Space Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The hidden fees of SpaceX

No one likes hidden fees. From unauthorized phone charges to home closing costs and prepaid card levies, they take a toll on low and middle-income Americans. To mitigate consumer outrage, members of Congress often demagogue unknown expenditures like ATM and airline baggage fees in committee hearings; costs which usually do not amount to more than a few dollars.

Related Articles

Illustration on problems with continued U.S. support of the Palestinians by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The faded Palestinian issue

President Trump set off another Twitter firestorm last week when he hinted that he may be considering cutting off hundreds of millions of dollars in annual U.S. aid to the Palestinians. Mr. Trump was angered over Palestinian unwillingness to engage in peace talks with Israel after the Trump administration announced the move of the U.S. Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with lawmakers on immigration policy in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, in Washington. From left, Trump, Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Dear White House: It's not a 'DACA Deal' it's a 'Wall Deal'

- The Washington Times

Words matter. And how the public perceives things is often dictated by the words used to describe those things. No one knows this lesson better than President Donald Trump who has effectively used labels and names to promote his own ideas and efforts while tearing down and destroying his opponents.

FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2012, file photo, Ann Coulter gestures while speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington. Delta pushed back at Coulter after the conservative commentator berated the carrier on Twitter over a changed seat assignment for a July 15, 2017, flight from New York to West Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Coulter on Trump's immigration meeting: Confirms worst things in Wolff's book

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump's "watch how the sausage gets made" meeting with congressional leaders on pending immigration issues was not pleasant television programming for one of his most ardent and vocal supporters. Columnist and author Ann Coulter called it "the worst day of his presidency" while appearing on my daily radio show on WMAL in Washington DC:

In this file photo, demonstrators urging the Democratic Party to protect the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Act (DACA) rally outside the office of California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein in Los Angeles Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

DACA stays, as judge hands Obama feather for his cap

- The Washington Times

A federal judge in California ruled that President Donald Trump's move to end the Barack Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program was misguided and therefore must remain in place. And Obama, whose pet DACA program has been a thorn in the side of control border types for years, just won another feather for his cap.

Meryl Streep, left, and Ai-jen Poo arrive at the 75th annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

Golden Globes: Another round of 'Hollywood fakery'

Most people did not watch the Golden Globes, one of the many parties in which the entertainment industry pats itself on the back and gives its friends awards. But, to paraphrase a few on Twitter, it was at least nice for Hollywood take a break from raping each other for at least one evening.

Trump should bring up Beirut now

Iranian protests give President Donald Trump a chance to address with the ayatollahs the great casualties inflicted in Beirut in 1983 against Americans and the French. From Aug. 25, 1982, to Feb. 26, 1984, U.S. Marines served in Lebanon under the most difficult rules of engagement, restrictions on fire support and political posturing. On Aug. 25, 1982, about 800 Marines of the 32d Marine Amphibious Unit (MAU) landed in Beirut as part of a multinational peacekeeping force and oversaw the evacuation of PLO guerrillas under Israeli siege. The force included 400 French and 800 Italian soldiers. On Sept. 10 of that year, after the evacuation of the PLO was complete, 32d MAU was withdrawn. Then, in the wake of the assassination of President-elect Bashir Gemayel, the 32d MAU returned to Beirut and remained until Oct. 30, when it was relieved by the 24th MAU.

Climate scientists blowing hot air

Why do we keep listening to so-called "experts" who continue to change their story on climate change? As an engineer, I have found that if a set of data does not create to the results we observe, then there is a problem with the method of evaluation. The climate scientists have many years of data that they have used to predict climate-change results that have not been anywhere close to what has actually occurred.

Draining the national security swamp

One year into President Trump's tenure, anti-Trump political bias in the FBI and Department of Justice is now so obvious that objective observers should fear for the future of our constitutional republic from the "deep state."

Stopping an outrageous land grab

The Mississippi gopher frog (or the "dusky gopher frog" in official federal parlance) may soon get his 15 minutes of fame, but the frog deserves better than being a pawn in a case that pits an overreaching government agency against property owners.

Book jacket: "Supreme Injustice: Slavery in the Nation's Highest Court"

Grappling with unsettling truths about slavery

Only by ignoring the pervasive presence of slavery in 18th century America is there a cohesive founding narrative for the United States as a bulwark against tyranny and a place where government is based on the concept that "all men are created equal."

Illustration on auditing the Pentagon by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why a Pentagon audit is overdue

At the beginning December 2017, the comptroller of the Department of Defense (DoD) David Norquist announced that DoD would conduct its first ever audit.

Illustration on protectionism from Whirlpool by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trade and South Korea

For the second time in a month the International Trade Commission (ITC) has invoked a rarely used provision of the 1974 International Trade Act to protect a U.S.-based company from "unfair" competition from foreign suppliers -- in this case South Korean producers of large residential washing machines or LRWs.

Illustration on bulletproof windshield for Philadelphia police cruisers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Protecting 'blue lives'

The good news is that Philadelphia police officers will soon be patrolling the city's mean streets in 150 new patrol cars that have been equipped with bulletproof windows.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with lawmakers on immigration policy, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, in Washington. From left, Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., Trump, Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump's new TV show -- genius at work

- The Washington Times

A Trump charm and, yes, intelligence lit up television screens all over America on Tuesday afternoon. Freed from the restraints and cautions of Bannonism, the president suddenly seems to soar like an eagle.