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Mike Pompeo. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Democratic terror of a miracle in North Korea

- The Washington Times

Trying to spark a new romance, or even arrange a weekend tryst, is not always easy. It’s impossible with the help of spectators eager to throw things, not orange blossoms but sticks and stones with sharp edges. But that’s how Washington tries to conduct diplomacy, circa 2018.

Illustration on Taiwan's contributions to world health by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Taiwan must be seated at the World Health Assembly

The constitution of the World Health Organization (WHO) notes that “the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social condition.” Yet WHO withheld, as last year, an invitation for Taiwan’s participation in May as an observer in the annual World Health Assembly (WHA) in Geneva, Switzerland.

House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway, R-Texas, joined at left by Vice Chairman Glenn Thompson, R-Pa., announces the new farm bill, officially known as the 2018 Agriculture and Nutrition Act, at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 12, 2018. The bulk of the bill's spending goes toward funding SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Faith leaders skew Bible to oppose SNAP reform

- The Washington Times

Faith leaders are coming out in full force to oppose the Republican-sponsored Farm Bill released in the House that imposes stricter work requirements on those receiving food stamps. Do not be fooled by their so-called Christian arguments in opposition of this bill. Their arguments are neither Christian nor common sense.

The Birth of a New Economic Recovery Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The optimists may be right

In January, Wall Street investors were optimistic tax cuts would sustain economic growth and the Trump bull market. As spring arrives, the world has proven decidedly more uncertain.

Illustration on the costs of Elon Musk's Space X by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The crony capitalist in free market clothing

You might imagine that pro-capitalism, free-market folk like me would just love what Elon Musk has done in the past couple of decades but you’d be wrong. I enjoy his entrepreneurial spirit and success, founding company (zip2) after company (PayPal) after company (The Boring Co.) and turning them into properties worth billions and then moving along to the next new thing. Props and kudos to this son of South Africa and prototype for “Iron Man.” You got those parts right.

William Wachtel holds up a mock Social Security card of President-elect Donald Trump as he speaks to members of the media following a meeting with Trump at Trump Tower in New York, Monday, Jan. 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A fresh start for a beleaguered agency

It seemed like it would never happen. But after more than five years, a formal nomination of a Social Security commissioner will finally be considered by the U.S. Senate. This is a long overdue development. The delay of a nomination, however, pales compared to the wait a million Americans continue to endure for a hearing that will decide if they will receive the Social Security disability benefits they earned while working.

President Donald Trump gestures during a news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Trump's private Mar-a-Lago club, Wednesday, April 18, 2018, in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump and the attorney-client privilege

A few weeks ago, President Trump was an outwardly happy man because of the utterance of one solitary word from the lips of special counsel Robert Mueller to one of Mr. Trump’s lawyers. The word that thrilled the president and his legal team was “subject.”

The Tarmac Meeting Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Clintons and the rule of law

Former Obama Attorney General Loretta Lynch, in a NBC interview last Monday, reopened a can of worms. In the interview, Ms. Lynch defended her private meeting with Bill Clinton back on June 27, 2016.

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Robert De Niro opens Tribeca with rips of Trump: 'Lowlife-in-chief'

- The Washington Times

Robert De Niro, who used to be an actor of considerable weight but now seems more a deliverer of public jabs at President Donald Trump, tipped his has-been hat once again at the recent Tribeca Film Festival press luncheon, calling out the commander-in-chief as a "lowlife-in-chief" -- and that was just his warmup.

The Barbara Bush I remember

- The Washington Times

From a first-floor window in the family's summer home on Walker's Point, Barbara Bush spied me standing bemused, shivering and overcoat-less.

The Return Of "Old-Fashioned" Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The return of the 'old-fashioned'

Call me old-fashioned -- and I've been called worse -- but do I sense the possible end to the sexual revolution, which exploded in the Sixties and whose fallout continues today?

Illustration on the FBI's reaction to Jim Comey's book    The Washington Times

The G-men and their emojis

Once upon a time in a previous century I was invited to watch a widely banned movie, "I Am Curious Yellow," in company with a number of FBI agents and officials to see just how naughty it was. I had written about censorship and whether the movie was over the line of decency.

The Capitol Dome of the Capitol Building at sunrise, Friday, Feb. 9, 2018, in Washington. After another government shutdown, congress has passed a sweeping long term spending bill which President Donald Trump is expected to sign later this morning. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Dancing around the budget

The typical congressman just can't help himself. He's the grown-up kid who fished his daddy's credit card out of his pants pocket while Daddy slept, and he has been the big man on the high-school campus since. This lack of self-restraint was further demonstrated last week when a vote on a balanced-budget amendment to the Constitution failed once more.

Sports unite us all

Major League Baseball's honoring last weekend of the 71st anniversary of Jackie Robinson integrating the sport reminded me of the Brooklyn Dodgers, Ebbets Field and Hank Greenberg. It was a time when men and women of all ages, classes, races and religions commingled in the stands, rooting for Jackie Robinson and his teammates, regardless of their ethnic origin, game after game.

Bolton has work cut out

We can all agree with Martha McSally that the choice of John Bolton as President Trump's national security adviser is a good one ("America in good hands," Web, April 16). While applauding the choice, though, let us not go overboard in our praise too quickly. Mr. Bolton prepares to undertake a herculean task.

When 'The Bomb' prevented a war

Will historians ever acknowledge that the atomic bomb, despite its horrors, stands as the most effective anti-war weapon in history?

In this Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017, file photo, Jordan Peele poses for a portrait at the SLS Hotel in Los Angeles. (Photo by Rich Fury/Invision/AP)

Barack Obama fake news video highlights dangers of AI

- The Washington Times

Fake news, meet artificial intelligence. A video created by Oscar-winning filmmaker Jordan Peele and released by BuzzFeed appears to show Barack Obama referencing the movie "Black Panther," remarking on HUD Secretary Ben Carson and calling President Donald Trump a "total and complete dips--." But it was all fake. And get ready for the floodgates to open on more AI-assisted fake videos and audio.