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Former President Richard Nixon. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

An Olympian break in the war between the words

- The Washington Times

A few Ping-Pong balls broke the Cold War ice around China a generation ago, following Richard Nixon’s stunning trip to Beijing (when it was still called Peiping), and soon the United States and China were on their way to normal diplomatic relations.

Illustration on the recent nuclear alarm in Hawaii by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Hawaii error and liberal hysteria

Murphy’s Law was written to describe how governments work. It was proved yet again on January 13 when an employee of the Hawaii Emergency Management System sent a cellphone alert that said, “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.” The alert was false but until it was corrected almost 40 minutes later it terrified millions of residents and tourists.

Illustration on protecting aborted babies delivered alive by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Giving the smallest patients equal protection under the law

Doctors today routinely diagnose and treat a myriad of conditions, illnesses and diseases suffered by society’s littlest patients — unborn babies and newborns — significantly enhancing both their health and longevity.

Illustration on GOP political dangers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When politicians exploit inequality

For Republicans, it’s dangerous to focus on the moment — accusations that President Trump is a racist, DACA and avoiding government shutdowns — but the more enduring threat to the GOP’s grip on power are charges of insensitivity about inequality.

Illustration on unintended Democrat sabotage of DACA legislation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The fate of the Dreamers

Donald Trump probably shouldn’t have suggested — not in public, at least — that Haiti and other nations that send refugees and immigrants to the United States are “s-holes.” It’s not only demeaning; it adds insult to injury.

Rep. John Culberson, Texas Republican, said, "The time is right" to consider a return to earmarks. He is pushing for a test run so Congress can prove it can be responsible. (Associated Press/File)

The trouble with earmarks

Nearly a year after President Trump was sworn into office on a campaign pledge to “drain the swamp,” he now wants Congress to reopen the spending spigots again.

Illustration on high tech's deleterious effects on commerce by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Big Tech chameleon

Twenty years ago, no one had heard of either Facebook or Google, neither of which existed yet. For that matter, no one knew much about social media or search engines in general.

"I'm not a racist. I'm the least racist person you will ever interview," said President Trump told reporters as he met with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, California Republican (left). The furor grew out of an immigration discussion at the White House on Thursday where Mr. Trump allegedly made vulgar comments. (Associated Press)

‘Trump’s a racist’ — Marcia, Marcia, Marcia

- The Washington Times

There comes a point when calling a spade a spatula becomes a bit worn and wearying and the public starts to catch on and actually notice and say, hey, that’s a spatula, not a spade. In other words: People start to doubt the message is actually true.

Taxpayer Money Lost in  Space Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The hidden fees of SpaceX

No one likes hidden fees. From unauthorized phone charges to home closing costs and prepaid card levies, they take a toll on low and middle-income Americans. To mitigate consumer outrage, members of Congress often demagogue unknown expenditures like ATM and airline baggage fees in committee hearings; costs which usually do not amount to more than a few dollars.

Uncle Sam Watching You Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The undoing of limited government

Late last week, Rep. Devin Nunes, California Republican, chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, repeated his public observations that members of the intelligence community — particularly the CIA, the NSA and the intelligence division of the FBI — are not trustworthy with the nation’s intelligence secrets. Because he has a security clearance at the “top secret” level and knows how others who have access to secrets have used and abused them, his allegations are extraordinary.

Illustration on China's dam building frenzy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China’s dam frenzy

China’s hyperactive dam building is a reminder that, while international attention remains on its recidivist activities in the South China Sea’s disputed waters, it is also focusing quietly on other waters — of rivers that originate in Chinese-controlled territory like Tibet and flow to other countries. No country in history has built more dams than China. In fact, China today boasts more dams than the rest of the world combined.

Related Articles

A supporter of President Donald Trump challenges police officers and a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program during a rally outside the office of California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon) ** FILE **

Nightmare for Dreamers

DACA, "Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals," is an Obama pen-and-phone program, not one created by legislation. It was simply a policy announced by President Obama on June 15, 2013. The date was chosen because it was the 30th anniversary of Plyler v. Doe, a Supreme Court decision that barred public schools from charging illegal immigrant children tuition.

A pair of postal workers shovel the lot at the Plainville, Mass., Post Office Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018. The post office was open for business as usual.  (Mark Stockwell/The Sun Chronicle via AP)

Another view of the U.S. Postal Service

Along with political coverage and analysis generally regarded as top-flight, The Washington Times apparently also possesses a good sense of humor.

Finding solutions for chronic disease

Imagine if millions of people drowned each year due to lack of aquatic skills and we, as a society, thought it reasonable to invest most resources into finding a cure for human drowning instead of teaching people how to swim properly. Unfortunately we are doing something similar with chronic disease.

This frame from video released by the Chelsea Manning Senate campaign on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018 shows Chelsea Manning in a campaign video. Manning on Sunday confirmed via Twitter that she is a candidate for U.S. Senate. (Chelsea Manning For US Senate via AP)

Seeking refuge in the U.S. Senate

Chelsea Manning, who used to think she was Bradley Manning, and who was once a private first class in the U.S. Army before he became a traitor, now thinks he can be a U.S. senator from Maryland. Maryland may not be quite that deep shade of blue, but it's a brave new era in the Democratic Party, where feverish Democrats think Donald Trump is insane and Bradley Manning is a woman because he says he is.

Not all immigrants are the same

The latest dust-up concerning President Trump and immigration reminds me that believing Sen. Durbin's statement requires an ideological imperative. However, in general, modern Western minds usually fail to recognize the colonial period as merely an interruption in millennia of tribal warfare. When the colonialists left, these people groups unwrapped the gift of freedom to rediscover the prehistory norms of crushing civil wars, murderous political intrigues, and pandemics of disease and starvation created by ruling elites from the ascendant tribes as they again strove for power by extinguishing their rivals.

America's first counterinsurgency expert

Edward Lansdale is probably the greatest cold warrior that most Americans have never heard of. Max Boot has written a fascinating account of how this California college humorist, frat boy and advertising executive evolved into a counterinsurgency expert before the term was even coined. He was a virtual shadow American proconsul in both the Philippines and South Vietnam in the 1950s wisely advising both Philippine President Ramon Magsaysay and South Vietnamese leader No Dinh Diem on how to deal with Communist inspired insurgencies.

Christian sects and religious minorities face brutal persecution in areas controlled by the Islamic State. Activists say an official finding by the Obama administration that the persecution amounts to genocide should set in motion a number of legal and financial sanctions and give the issue a much greater urgency around the world. (Associated Press)

'Islamic oppression' strikes again, as 3,066 Christians killed, 1,020 raped

- The Washington Times

The Bible tells Christians to beware, that to follow Jesus paves the way for a life of challenge, mocking and persecution -- that specifically, as Matthew 10:22 states, "you will be hated by all for [His] name's sake." Well, according to a new report from Open Doors, a nonprofit that supports the spread of the faith in even the most hostile of areas, that ain't no joke.

White House: 73% of convicted terrorists since 9/11 were non-citizens

- The Washington Times

Between September 11, 2001 and December 31, 2016, 549 people were convicted of international terror offenses in United States federal court. Of those convicted terrorists, 254 were foreign-born non-citizens accounting for 73% of the convictions, according to a senior administration official who provided the data for reporters during a background briefing Tuesday.

This frame from video released by the Chelsea Manning Senate campaign on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018 shows Chelsea Manning in a campaign video. Manning on Sunday confirmed via Twitter that she is a candidate for U.S. Senate. (Chelsea Manning For US Senate via AP)

Linda Sarsour endorses Chelsea Manning for U.S. Senate

- The Washington Times

The traitor formerly known as "Bradley Manning" announced their candidacy for United States Senate in Maryland Monday and the former Army private has already lined up a key endorsement of sorts, none other than anti-Israel activist and pink-hat-wearing-angry-woman-march organizer Linda Sarsour:

In this Sept. 28, 2017, file photo, homes and other buildings destroyed by Hurricane Maria lie in ruins in Toa Alta, Puerto Rico. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

Puerto Rico newspaper columnist blames 'the Jew' for island ills

- The Washington Times

A columnist for one of Puerto Rico's largest circulation newspapers, El Nueva Dia, wrote in a recent piece that the reason the country is still struggling, post Hurricane Maria, and its citizens, living in disastrous conditions is because of Jews in America. Yes, that is what Wilda Rodriguez put forth in a piece titled, "What Does 'The Jew' Want From the Colony?"

In this Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, photo released by the Riverside County Sheriff's Department shows suspect David Allen Turpin. Authorities say an emaciated teenager led deputies to a California home where her 12 brothers and sisters were locked up in filthy conditions, with some of them malnourished and chained to beds. Riverside County sheriff's deputies arrested the parents David Allen Turpin and Louise Anna Turpin on Sunday. The parents could face charges including torture and child endangerment. (Riverside County Sheriff's Department via AP)

Evil, cloaked in Christianity

- The Washington Times

A Perris, California, couple who have been accused of shackling their 13 children to their beds and imprisoning them in filthy, dark, disgusting conditions were -- according to the grandmom -- good Christians who were simply living out their faith by having so many kids. Nope. God had nothing to do with this evil. In fact, this couple gives God a bad name.

In this Jan. 10, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump listens during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Fearful Dems preemptively strike State of Union

- The Washington Times

Democrats must be shaking in their Birkenstocks. How else to explain their many, many and many more preemptive strikes at President Donald Trump's State of the Union speech -- a speech that doesn't even take place until Jan. 30?

A model has his hair cut as he waits backstage prior to the start of Versace men's Fall-Winter 2018-19 collection, that was presented in Milan, Italy, Saturday, Jan.13, 2018. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

The cosmetology cops

Few things could be more American than volunteering to help others. So it's a shame when our altruism is thwarted by another, far more lamentable American trait: big government.

Illustration on the purpose of immigration law by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Immigration and 'rathole' countries

Many people in poor places try to migrate to richer places — and so it has always been. But some poor places become rich places and immigration flows change as a result. There are many examples of "rathole" countries changing policies and becoming rich, and relatively rich countries becoming ratholes as a result of corruption and/or socialism (e.g., Venezuela).