Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

For several years, the resurgent oil and gas sector was almost the sole truly bright spot of the economy. (Associated Press/File)

Free markets and free trade will fuel U.S. energy dominance

42 minutes ago

To further capitalize on America’s energy renaissance, the Trump administration should reconsider and look to strengthen free trade — particularly with Canada and Mexico, our two largest energy trading partners.

Illustration on merit-based immigration policy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump’s merit-based immigration system

For decades, the American people have been begging and pleading with our elected officials for an immigration system that is lawful and that serves our national interest.

Tax Cut Balloons Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Lasting and transformative tax relief

A staggering 13 billion dollars. More than the value of the entire “Star Wars” franchise. That’s the minimum amount taxpayers will save under the recently-passed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act now that lawmakers have made compliance with the U.S. tax code less of a chore. Taxpayers will now also save an estimated 210 million hours of time they used to squander on the clumsy 1040 “long form.” Lighter paperwork burdens like these will begin showing up in other portions of the tax code for businesses and individuals as the new law is implemented.

Chart to accompany Moore article of Jan. 22, 2018.

The Democrats’ fiscal trap

With all the talk about a possible government shutdown due to an impasse on immigration reform, no one seems to be paying attention to a story of even bigger long-term consequence. Congress is preparing a two-year budget that blows past bipartisan spending caps to the tune of $216 billion through 2019. These are the latest stunning tallies from an analysis by Congressional Quarterly. (See chart).

Former President Richard Nixon. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

An Olympian break in the war between the words

- The Washington Times

A few Ping-Pong balls broke the Cold War ice around China a generation ago, following Richard Nixon’s stunning trip to Beijing (when it was still called Peiping), and soon the United States and China were on their way to normal diplomatic relations.

Illustration on the recent nuclear alarm in Hawaii by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Hawaii error and liberal hysteria

Murphy’s Law was written to describe how governments work. It was proved yet again on January 13 when an employee of the Hawaii Emergency Management System sent a cellphone alert that said, “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.” The alert was false but until it was corrected almost 40 minutes later it terrified millions of residents and tourists.

Illustration on protecting aborted babies delivered alive by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Giving the smallest patients equal protection under the law

Doctors today routinely diagnose and treat a myriad of conditions, illnesses and diseases suffered by society’s littlest patients — unborn babies and newborns — significantly enhancing both their health and longevity.

Illustration on GOP political dangers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When politicians exploit inequality

For Republicans, it’s dangerous to focus on the moment — accusations that President Trump is a racist, DACA and avoiding government shutdowns — but the more enduring threat to the GOP’s grip on power are charges of insensitivity about inequality.

Illustration on unintended Democrat sabotage of DACA legislation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The fate of the Dreamers

Donald Trump probably shouldn’t have suggested — not in public, at least — that Haiti and other nations that send refugees and immigrants to the United States are “s-holes.” It’s not only demeaning; it adds insult to injury.

Rep. John Culberson, Texas Republican, said, "The time is right" to consider a return to earmarks. He is pushing for a test run so Congress can prove it can be responsible. (Associated Press/File)

The trouble with earmarks

Nearly a year after President Trump was sworn into office on a campaign pledge to “drain the swamp,” he now wants Congress to reopen the spending spigots again.

Illustration on high tech's deleterious effects on commerce by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Big Tech chameleon

Twenty years ago, no one had heard of either Facebook or Google, neither of which existed yet. For that matter, no one knew much about social media or search engines in general.

"I'm not a racist. I'm the least racist person you will ever interview," said President Trump told reporters as he met with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, California Republican (left). The furor grew out of an immigration discussion at the White House on Thursday where Mr. Trump allegedly made vulgar comments. (Associated Press)

‘Trump’s a racist’ — Marcia, Marcia, Marcia

- The Washington Times

There comes a point when calling a spade a spatula becomes a bit worn and wearying and the public starts to catch on and actually notice and say, hey, that’s a spatula, not a spade. In other words: People start to doubt the message is actually true.

Related Articles

Illustration on the Clinton/Lewinsky scandal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Vindication for a whistleblower

What fools (and hypocrites) these mortals be. Two decades have passed since Linda Tripp blew the whistle on sexual hijinks in high places with her tapes of Monica Lewinsky, the young intern, describing to her confidant and colleague the passionate ordeal of a sexual liaison with the president of the United States. She blew the whistle, she says, to protect her friend, but 20 years on she's still a villain for many women who remember those times.

Uncle Sam Watching You Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The undoing of limited government

Late last week, Rep. Devin Nunes, California Republican, chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, repeated his public observations that members of the intelligence community — particularly the CIA, the NSA and the intelligence division of the FBI — are not trustworthy with the nation's intelligence secrets. Because he has a security clearance at the "top secret" level and knows how others who have access to secrets have used and abused them, his allegations are extraordinary.

FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 20, 2017, file photo, people stand in line near an Apple Store at an outdoor shopping mall in Beijing, China. On Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018, Apple announced it is planning to build another corporate campus and hire 20,000 workers during the next five years as part of a $350 billion commitment to the U.S. economy. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)

Apple brings it home

The announcement on Wednesday that Apple Inc. will bring $350 billion in cash parked overseas — that's billion with a B — home to the United States, to invest here and create as many as 20,000 new jobs, is likely to be the economic story of the year.

Terrorists are not welcome here

In the recent Washington Times news article ("American-born children of immigrants proving fruitful recruiting ground for jihad in U.S., Web) it would have been interesting if the Department of Homeland Security would have broken down the statistic that "75 percent of terrorists convicted in the U.S. are foreign born" to include ethnic origin and citizenship. Certainly there are gangs of drug sellers and murderers within their own communities who should never have been allowed into this nation.

'The Russian people knew they were being lied to'

From the beginning, Americans have been taught that a free press is essential to the well-being of our democracy. And that has proved true, time and time again. But that truth seems uniquely threatened today, as the organs of our major media increasingly subscribe to an ideological, political and cultural group-think, more Orwellian than Stalinist, but equally insidious.

A First Amendment threat

The U.S. Supreme Court is currently considering a case, the National Institute of Family Life Advocates (NIFLA) v. Becerra. From all indications, virtually none of the American public is aware of this vitally important case.

The folly of pre-emptive war

Ironically, what could be the biggest political threat to the Trump presidency now is the failure to live up to his lofty "winning" campaign promises by waging a pre-emptive war on North Korea.

FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2016 file photo, Godfrey Dillard, left, and Perry Wallace take part in a lecture at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn.  Wallace, who broke down a racial barrier by becoming the first black varsity basketball player in the Southeastern Conference, has died. He was 69. Wallace's death was announced Friday, Dec. 1, 2017,  by Vanderbilt University, where Wallace became an all-SEC player and remains among the Commodores' all-time rebounding leaders. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File) **FILE**

SNYDER: Sports can teach 'uncomfortable truths' about race and society

Athletic competition can teach us a lot. Through sports, we're able to learn about athletes and fans, as well as coaches and owners. The most obvious lessons center on principles like sacrifice, dedication and commitment. No one comes close to, or reaches, championships without paying a price, whether in team or individual sports.

In this Oct, 28, 2014, file photo, flowers surround a photo of slain Sacramento County Deputy Sheriff Daniel Oliver at the Sacramento County Sheriff's office in Sacramento, Calif. Luis Enrique Monroy Bracamontes, the suspect being tried in the slayings of  Oliver and Scott Brown, called Brown a "coward" as his murder trial began on Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

Illegal charged with cop-killing: 'Wish I had killed more'

- The Washington Times

An illegal immigrant facing murder charges for the killing of two law enforcement officers in Northern California went off the rails during his court hearing and said, with a grin on his face, "I wish I had killed more," Fox News reported. This is what the sanctuary-loving left wants to shelter from the deportation storm?

In this Dec. 15, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, left, sits with Attorney General Jeff Sessions during the FBI National Academy graduation ceremony in Quantico, Va. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

DOJ, in rare but welcome move, petitions SCOTUS to end DACA

- The Washington Times

The Department of Justice is petitioning the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a federal judge's ruling on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a rare intervention that could finally hand the White House a win on the Barack Obama-implemented program. Good. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is right to wage a fight on this. The idea that a former president's executively issued command that wrongfully skirted Congress is now hard and fast U.S. law is a bit much to stomach.

Illustration on the varied content of private conversations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Good news vs. private conversations

Last week the headlines should have abounded with the year's good news. It was the economy: GDP up some 3 percent and for the last quarter nearly 4 percent, unemployment down to a 17-year low and black unemployment at the lowest level since such statistics were compiled. The stock market was soaring, up some 42 percent since Donald Trump was elected, and inflation was low. It was the best Christmas season in years.

Illustration on the need for a bipartisan immigration deal by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The president's speech

Much of my so-called career as a foreign correspondent was spent in countries that could accurately be described with the scatological adjective allegedly uttered by President Trump last week.

Illustration on China's dam building frenzy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China's dam frenzy

China's hyperactive dam building is a reminder that, while international attention remains on its recidivist activities in the South China Sea's disputed waters, it is also focusing quietly on other waters — of rivers that originate in Chinese-controlled territory like Tibet and flow to other countries. No country in history has built more dams than China. In fact, China today boasts more dams than the rest of the world combined.

Illustration on lowering veterans' suicide rates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lowering the suicide rates of those who serve

President Donald Trump last week signed an executive order which seeks to lower suicides rates among our nation's veterans. The order, which would take effect in March, expands mental health services for transitioning veterans upon their return home to civilian life. Mr. Trump hailed the order as a "historic step to make sure that our incredible veterans are taken care of in a proper manner."