Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, and Vietnam Communist Party General Secretary Nguyen Phu Trong, right, wave during a welcoming ceremony at the presidential palace in Hanoi, Vietnam Sunday, Nov. 12, 2017. (Hoang Dinh Nam/Pool Photo via AP)

The double-edged sword of China

A few weeks ago, Chinese President Xi Jinping offered a Soviet-style five-year plan for China’s progress at the Communist Party Congress in Beijing. Despite his talk of global cooperation, the themes were familiar socialist boilerplate about Chinese economic and military superiority to come.

Illustration on 529 savings accounts by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Giving families a helping hand with educational expenses

Putting four children through college would be a challenge for most families. Certainly it is for Jenny Clark and her husband, Michael, but they have made saving for their children’s college educations a priority.

Illustration on King Josiah hearing the reading of the law    The Washington Times

Rediscovering the Bible lost in America

There’s an Old Testament story that bears striking resemblance to what’s going on today in America. It’s the story of King Josiah finding the lost Book of the Law.

Former President Bill Clinton speaks at a gathering in Little Rock, Ark., on Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017, marking 25 years since his election. He and his wife Hillary Clinton appeared before about 2,600 people at the event in the Statehouse Convention Center. (AP Photo/Kelly P. Kissel)

The liberal ruse of feminism

Charlie Rose, formerly of PBS and CBS. Glenn Thrush of The New York Times. The collapse of the liberal establishment Masters of the Universe continues. Yet for some reason, the Democratic and liberal establishment think now is the time to condemn … Bill Clinton.

American Negotiations with North Korea Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Encouraging signs following Trump’s visit to Seoul

I was part of a small fact-finding delegation to South Korea immediately after President Trump’s Nov. 7-8 visit. The message we received in Seoul was universal: President Trump’s visit was a success; his presentation at the National Assembly was well-received. To a person, all were appreciative of the president’s comments, juxtaposing a vibrant liberal democracy in the South and an authoritarian and capricious regime in the North.

Volunteers tie the wooden cross that was carried through the streets of Etna, Pa., a Pittsburgh suburb, to the larger cross in the cemetery where their annual "Drama of The Cross," service was done on Good Friday, Friday, April 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) ** FILE **

America on fire, as love for God cools

- The Washington Times

America was built on Judeo-Christian principles, steered into existence by Founding Fathers who believed — yes, even the less religious ones — that this republic could not survive absent a moral, virtuous people. My, how wise the founders. That was then. This is now: Roy Moore. Al Franken.

Illustration on cybersecurity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Closing the cyber skills gap

In the digitally integrated world we live in today, it’s nearly impossible to function successfully in any industry without making cybersecurity staffing a priority. No matter the size, no matter the sector, businesses all across the country are in growing need of professionals who specialize in cybersecurity.

Illustration of Bill and Hillary Clinton by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A tale of two cultures

“Prospect of New Special Counsel Rattles Justice” was the scary front-page headline on a recent, worried edition of The Washington Post. The faux fuss was caused by Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ suggestion that after weighing recommendations from senior prosecutors, he might appoint a special counsel to investigate Hillary Clinton’s role in the Uranium One deal.

Map of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Nagorno Karabakh

Losing the moral compass over Nagorno-Karabakh

When it comes to American foreign aid, it is often the message — rather than the dollar figure — that matters. A textbook case is Nagorno-Karabakh, the internationally recognized Azerbaijani territory, illegally occupied by Armenia.

Senator Al Franken   Associated Press photo

Back to the future with Franken

- The Washington Times

It’s already begun. Liberal activists and pundits are arguing that Minnesota Sen. Al Franken’s documented piggishness toward women should be discounted, forgiven or perhaps even ignored given the fact that he is, well, one of them.

Hillary and Bill Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Who knew so much testosterone rides the capital breeze?

- The Washington Times

These are not happy times for anybody. You can’t keep up with the serial sexual offenders without a scorecard, and the list grows longer every day and all the claims won’t fit on one scorecard. Seekers of cash settlements are advised to not take checks, and hurry to the bank and get in line before the cash runs out.

Related Articles

Illustration on the battle of Stalingrad by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Remembering Stalingrad 75 years later

Seventy-five years ago this month, the Soviet Red Army surrounded -- and would soon destroy -- a huge invading German army at Stalingrad on the Volga River. Nearly 300,000 of Germany's best soldiers would never return home. The epic 1942-43 battle for the city saw the complete annihilation of the attacking German 6th Army. It marked the turning point of World War II.

Illustration on the escape skills of the Clintons by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary and Bill Houdini

How do they do it? I am not the first to compare the Clintons to Harry Houdini, the great magician and escape artist, but Bill and Hillary make him look like a rank amateur.

All quiet on Vegas shooting

The Las Vegas shooting happened on Oct. 1. It was covered by the news media for four to five days thereafter, with conflicting reports about the timeline, the shooter and the hotel security staff. Plus, even more conflicting reports were available from witnesses at the hotel and the venue, supported by audio and video recordings.

Remedial reading for Vladimir Putin and Bernie Sanders

Unlike many of his fellow academics, Yuri Slezkine, a professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley, is also an extremely gifted writer whose insight and erudition extend far beyond his specific discipline. He also has a keen sense of humor, which comes in handy when writing a massive book on a tragically depressing subject.

The sun sets behind 26 crosses placed in a field before a vigil for the victims of the First Baptist Church shooting Monday, Nov. 6, 2017, in Sutherland Springs, Texas. Texas officials confirmed Devin Patrick Kelley as the shooter who killed at least 26 people and wounded about 20 others at the church. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Devin Patrick Kelley, dead shooter, now accused of rape

- The Washington Times

Devin Patrick Kelley, the dead shooting suspect in the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs massacre, has now been named by four women as a rapist and sexual harasser. The more this story comes to light -- the more America learns about Kelley -- the more it becomes evident this guy just slipped through society's cracks.

Virginia Democratic Gov. elect Ralph Northam addresses supporters at the Northam For Governor election night party at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017. Northam defeated Republican Ed Gillespie. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Virginia: Ed Gillespie not a Donald Trump referendum

- The Washington Times

Ed Gillespie, Virginia's newest losing governor wanna-be -- who went down in flames to Democrat Ralph Northam -- will be talked about for days as the Voter Referendum on President Donald Trump. But his loss has less to do with Trump and more to do with Virginia's shifting demographics -- with Virginia's proximity to Big Government jobs.

A woman kneels in prayer at a makeshift memorial for the First Baptist Church shooting victims Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, in Sutherland Springs, Texas. A man opened fire inside the church in the small South Texas community on Sunday, killing more than two dozen and injuring others. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Mocking prayer after the massacre

We learn a lot about ourselves and others in the midst of a crisis. Hollywood and liberals had no problem revealing themselves for what they are (again) in the aftermath of the horror of the Texas church massacre. Liberals, these worshippers of failed big government, decided to condemn people of faith by mocking those who prayed on a day when 26 Christians were murdered.

Illustration on the need for patent examiners by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Protecting patents from unscrupulous trolls

The House Judiciary Committee met Tuesday to hear testimony on a patent deal between the drugmaker Allergan Plc and a Native American tribe. The deal has become a major scandal in the nation's communities of innovators.

Illustration on continuing bigotry by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Bigotry that's still in style

- The Washington Times

Chuck Morgan, who headed the American Civil Liberties Union Washington office in the early 1970s, was both a character and a good friend. Chuck hailed from Birmingham, Alabama, and was, of course, a graduate of the University of Alabama who gained notoriety as a staunch champion of civil rights at a time when standing up for blacks in Alabama was neither all that safe nor a career enhancer.

Illustration on the bin Laden diaries' revelations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Osama bin Laden's secret diary

On May 2, 2011, a Navy SEAL team made a brief stop in Abbottabad, Pakistan where they terminated Osama bin Laden's life and then moved on to their second mission: collecting as much information as possible from within the al Qaeda leader's compound.

Illustration on the Steele Dossier by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Democrats' dossier

In January, I wrote in these pages about the Democrats' dossier on Donald Trump. Much of what seemed likely about it at the time has since been confirmed. No surprise there. Hillary Clinton has confessed. But what is surprising is the general lack of appreciation for the significance of this sordid episode.

Illustration on moving to undo Obamacare by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending Obamacare, disregarding the law

In October, the Trump administration announced it plans to halt illegal federal subsidies paid to health insurers. Predictably, Democrats and liberal pundits alleged the move is reckless and will further undermine the Obamacare health insurance exchanges.