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Illustration on Gina Haspel's role in damaging the CIA by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fixing a weakened espionage brand

A group of former senior intelligence officials recently published a letter supporting Deputy CIA Director Gina Haspel as the nominee to be the next CIA director.

President Donald Trump speaks at the Generation Next Summit in the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, Thursday, March 22, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

How immigration affects environmental policy

No one would mistake President Trump for an environmentalist. Yet his immigration policies could inadvertently safeguard the environment far better than any proposal from Greenpeace or the Sierra Club.

Illustration on the dangers of abolishing the Second Amendment by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Second Amendment is here to stay

In a recent New York Times commentary, former U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice John Paul Stevens argued that the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution — the one that acknowledges the “right to keep and bear arms” — is a “relic of the 18th century.” Justice Stevens wants “a constitutional amendment to get rid of the Second Amendment” as a simple way to fight the National Rifle Association, which blocks gun-control legislation.

In this April 21, 2018, file photo, people watch a TV screen showing an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The signs read: "North Korea says it has suspended nuclear tests." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

A summit imperiled by Rocket Man’s travel tribulations

- The Washington Times

“Just getting there, as Cunard once boasted of transatlantic crossings by ship, “is half the fun.” The Atlantic is still there, but ocean liners are not, and almost the only way to cross the ocean sea now is by air. That’s no fun at all. Dining aboard an ocean liner has been replaced by dining aloft, and you’re lucky to get a pretzel or a stale cracker.

Illustration on the Syrian situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What’s next in Syria

Western civilization — in the guise of its three leading powers — struck back at international lawlessness when they hit Syrian chemical sites on April 13. It remains to be seen whether the strike had the desired effect of deterring the Syrian leadership from the further use of such weapons. If it does, President Trump’s claim of “mission accomplished” will be justified. That brings up the key question of “what next?” if chemical weapons use continues.

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President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump greet French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Macron as they arrive for a State Dinner at the White House.

Finally we can let Melania be Melania

This has been the fortnight of the first ladies. Last week the focus was on two former first ladies, one about mourning and fond admiring recollections, and one about yet another book of scathing analytical criticism. Barbara Bush was celebrated for her blunt dignity. Hillary Clinton was recalled for her campaign of blunt excuses for her own failures.

In this April 4, 2018 photo, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks on a question during a town hall meeting with Jackson Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba, examining economic justice 50 years after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., in Jackson, Miss. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

'Crazy Bernie' is at it again

There he goes again. Despite the lowest unemployment rate in 17 years, including declining rates for minorities, Sen. Bernie Sanders, Vermont Independent, affectionately called "crazy Bernie" by some conservative talk show hosts, is again flirting with the idea that the federal government should guarantee every American a job, paying a minimum of $15 an hour and health care benefits.

President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron walk from the Oval Office to a tree planting ceremony on the South Lawn at the White House in Washington, Monday, April 23, 2018. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

To a real nuclear deal

Human events sometimes seem to spill across the globe without rhyme or reason, but occasionally events converge in harmonic fashion, revealing a stunning opportunity.

Liberal Media on Cable Television Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The angry left and its adversaries

Has it been noted that the country's political disagreements are becoming increasingly violent? About 15 years ago "the angry left" appeared on the scene, and its indignant members got a lot of attention from the media. The enormous volume of press attention signaled the media's manifest approval, if sotto voce. Next came the Occupiers' movement, and again these ruffians came with the media's approval, at least sotto voce. Then gun-toting cowards began shooting people for humanitarian reasons, and the media did not know what to think. The assassination attempt on House Majority Whip Steve Scalise and his colleagues comes to mind.