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Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas is one of the most widely syndicated political columnists in America. Based in Washington, he is a wide-ranging social commentator, not a "beltway insider," who supports traditional conservative values and the American "can-do spirit." He'll take on virtually any topic, from the decline of the family to growing terrorism worldwide.

A columnist for 30 years, his latest book is "What Works: Common Sense Solutions for a Stronger America." Readers may email Mr. Thomas at [email protected].

Articles by Cal Thomas

The dome of St. Peter's Basilica is partially engulfed in the fog behind statues of saints adorning the colonnade designed by 16th century Italian sculptor and architect Gian Lorenzo Bernini, in St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican, Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

The shame of the Catholic Church

One doesn't have to be Roman Catholic or even Christian to recognize the great good the Catholic Church has done. America would be worse off were it not its pro-life stance and numerous acts of charity. Published November 14, 2018

Illustration on vote fraud in Florida by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'What's wrong with Florida elections?'

Sen. Marco Rubio, Florida Republican, had the best line when it comes to the latest Florida election in which contests for governor and the U.S. Senate are still undecided. Published November 12, 2018

'Will the moment seize Democrats?'

We are about to find out whether Democrats meant it when they lamented the loss of civility in Washington. Having won the majority in the House of Representatives in Tuesday's elections, will they cooperate with Republicans and "reach across the aisle," or will they pander to their base, which wants President Trump's blood? Guess which scenario I'm betting on? Published November 7, 2018

Illustration on ending birthright citizenship by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ending birthright citizenship

In 2004, nearly 80 percent of Irish voters decided to end birthright citizenship. In its coverage the BBC said, "The government said change was needed because foreign women were travelling to Ireland to give birth in order to get an EU passport for their babies." Published November 5, 2018

Illustration on anti-Semitism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hating the Jews

"Some of my best friends are Jews." That familiar, yet offensive, phrase has been used by some people as a defense against an accusation of anti-Semitism. It's time, however, to rebrand it as a positive affirmation of love and concern for the Jewish people. Published October 31, 2018

Sending Bombs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The sickness spreads

Just in time for Halloween comes a former male stripper, who drove a van with Trump stickers plastered all over it, being charged with sending pipe bombs to top Democratic leaders, a journalist and at least one celebrity, all of whom have been vocal critics of President Trump. Published October 29, 2018

In this Oct. 21, 2018, photo, Central American migrants walking to the U.S. start their day departing Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

Invasion of the country snatchers

Is it more than coincidence that thousands of migrants from Central America are seeking to enter the United States illegally just two weeks before the midterm election? Who are these people? Who's paying for their transportation, food and expenses? Why doesn't the media find out? Is this migrant caravan a ploy by Democrats to win sympathy from Hispanic voters so they'll reverse their growing approval of Trump administration policies and vote against their interests? Published October 24, 2018

A plan for debt relief

As difficult as it may be to believe, there was a time when Republicans were known as the anti-debt and balanced budget party. Now, the GOP prefers to tout low unemployment as the debt soars and they are co-conspirators in its rise. Published October 22, 2018

Illustration on the Jamal khashoggi affair by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Khashoggi mystery

Major media are now reporting that the Saudis are "preparing" to admit that Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, a columnist for The Washington Post, died in their consulate in Istanbul, as the result of an interrogation gone wrong. Odds are good that admittance will never come. Published October 17, 2018

'Why vote for Democrats?'

Given what the Trump administration is saying are record achievements for a president at this stage in office, why would anyone consider voting for Democrats in the upcoming midterm elections? Published October 15, 2018

FILE - In this Dec. 12, 2016, file photo, protesters hold anti-abortion signs outside the Planned Parenthood Columbia Health Center on in Columbia, Mo. Planned Parenthood Great Plains spokeswoman Emily Miller says abortions scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018, at the Columbia clinic are canceled. Federal appeals judges ruled last month that Missouri can enforce a requirement that doctors performing abortions must have admitting privileges at hospitals. The Columbia clinic hasn't met that requirement. (Timothy Tai/Columbia Daily Tribune via AP, File)

'Gosnell': The movie

Arguably, a contributing factor to the continuation of abortion is that it is performed out of sight and thus, out of many minds. Published October 10, 2018

In this image from video provided by Senate TV, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine., speaks on the Senate floor about her vote on Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kananaugh, Friday, Oct. 5, 2018 in the Capitol in Washington.  Sen Shelly Capito, R-W.Va., sits rear left and Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith, R-Miss., sits right.  (Senate TV via AP)

Susan Collins' finest hour

In a speech announcing her vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court, Sen. Susan Collins, Maine Republican, reminded me of some of the great orators of the past. Her speech was measured in tone, substantive in content and delivered with conviction. Published October 8, 2018

Illustration on the new USMCA trade agreement by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A victory on trade

In baseball, when a team trades a player to another team each side expects a benefit in return. Not so in recent years when it comes to trade agreements between the United States and other countries. Published October 3, 2018

In this Sept. 27, 2018, photo, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Senate Judiciary Committee advanced Kavanaugh's nomination for the Supreme Court after agreeing to a late call from Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., for a one week investigation into sexual assault allegations against the high court nominee. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool)

Delay, deceive and destroy

Who believes another FBI investigation of Brett Kavanaugh will be the end of it? If the FBI finds nothing to support Christine Blasey Ford's testimony that Judge Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her at a high school party, will it be enough for Democrats to vote to confirm him? Republicans say the investigation is limited to her charge and that of a third accuser, Julie Swetnick, whose allegations, detailed in a sworn affidavit, claim she was the victim of gang rape. How many more will come forward? Published October 1, 2018

Brett Kavanaugh and his wife, Ashley, during an interview with Fox News host Martha McCallum   Associated Press photo

The Kavanaughs speak

At times Brett and Ashley Kavanaugh sounded rehearsed and overly cautious in their "exclusive" interview with Fox News host Martha MacCallum on Monday night. Judge Brett Kavanaugh repeated verbatim lines about defending his character and allowing the "process" to play out. He said he would not withdraw in the face of unsubstantiated charges against him. Published September 26, 2018

Illustration on the judiciary hearings circus by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ending the Judiciary circus

The Ringling Brothers & Barnum and Bailey Circus announced last year it was closing after a 146-year run, largely because of high operating costs, costly legal battles with animal rights groups and declining ticket sales, especially after elephants were retired from the show. Published September 24, 2018

Illustration on tactics delaying the Kavanaugh appointment by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Democrats' delay tactics

You have to hand it to the Democrats. They know how to use the media and the political process to gum up the works when it is to their advantage. Published September 19, 2018

Illustration on the Left's tactics against Brett Kavanaugh by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A delusional left running on empty

The woman who alleged in a confidential letter that as a high school student in Maryland in the '80s Brett Kavanaugh "pinned her to a bed on her back and groped her over her clothes, grinding his body against hers and clumsily attempting to pull off her one-piece bathing suit and the clothing she wore over it" has now revealed her identity to (surprise!) The Washington Post. Published September 17, 2018

Illustration on the Kavanaugh hearings' illumination of Constitutional principles by Linas Garsys/Thwe Washington Times

A history lesson from Judge Kavanaugh

They don't teach history, at least American history, like they did when I attended public school. That's why the recent hearings on Judge Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to become an associate justice on the U.S. Supreme Court served as a teachable moment. Published September 12, 2018

President Donald Trump brings an audience member up on stage to talk about coal during a fundraiser in Fargo, N.D., Friday, Sept. 7, 2018.      Associated Press photo

Obama goes on attack

He's back! President Obama has emerged from his supposed cloistered life to attack President Trump. Mr. Obama broke with a tradition apparently only modern Republican ex-presidents follow, which is not to speak ill of your successor. Published September 10, 2018