Cal Thomas | Stories - Washington Times
Skip to content

Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas is one of the most widely syndicated political columnists in America. Based in Washington, he is a wide-ranging social commentator, not a "beltway insider," who supports traditional conservative values and the American "can-do spirit." He'll take on virtually any topic, from the decline of the family to growing terrorism worldwide.

A columnist for 30 years, his latest book is "What Works: Common Sense Solutions for a Stronger America." Readers may email Mr. Thomas at [email protected].

Articles by Cal Thomas

FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2017 file photo, Harvey Weinstein arrives at The Weinstein Company and Netflix Golden Globes afterparty in Beverly Hills, Calif. New York state's top prosecutor has launched a civil rights investigation into The Weinstein Co. following sexual assault allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein. Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced the probe Monday. His office says it issued a subpoena seeking all company records (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

Sexual harassment up close and personal

While trying not to indulge in schadenfreude over those hypocritical Hollywood elites who've claimed to stand for "women's rights," only to be accused of sexually harassing them, I noticed "#MeToo" trending on Twitter. At #MeToo, women who have been sexually harassed are invited to post their experiences and many have done so, including four female U.S. senators. Published October 23, 2017

It's All About the Votes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Trump-McConnell detente

That was some chaotic scene in the White House Rose Garden Monday. After lunch with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Trump assured combative reporters and the country that the two are getting along just fine, in spite of the Senate's failure to repeal and replace Obamacare and an uncertain future over tax reform, the other Republican signature issue party members promised to get done. Published October 18, 2017

Vice President Mike Pence speaks on behalf of Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Ed Gillespie during a campaign rally at the Washington County Fairgrounds Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017, in Abingdon, Va. Establishment figure Gillespie is in a neck-and-neck race against Democratic Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam. (Andre Teague/The Bristol Herald-Courier via AP)

Trump heads, Pence tails

If a metaphor could be used for this White House, it might be a two-sided coin with President Trump as heads and Vice President Mike Pence as tails. Published October 16, 2017

University Snowflake Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Censorship in Seattle

If it were a plague, the government would rush to quarantine the infected, as occurred during Europe's Black Death in the 14th century. Published October 11, 2017

Illustration of Harvey Weinstein by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why criticize Harvey Weinstein

Ancient wisdom from a Higher Authority, which is available to anyone who takes the time to consider it, was provided to constrain people like Harvey Weinstein from acts he has been accused of committing. Published October 9, 2017

A wounded person is walked in on a wheelbarrow as Las Vegas police respond during an active shooter situation on the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017. Multiple victims were being transported to hospitals after a shooting late Sunday at a music festival on the Las Vegas Strip. Photo by Chase Stevens/Las Vegas Review-Journal via Associated Press

The definition of evil

Responding to the recent Las Vegas concert shooting that killed more than 50 people and injured hundreds more, President Trump described the act as one "of pure evil." Published October 4, 2017

Calvin Coolidge

The Coolidge formula

In school, I liked math the least and history the most. Both can be useful in the coming debate over President Trump's proposed tax reforms. Published October 2, 2017

They Killed the Goose Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Unnecessary roughness

If you like professional sports, a major reason -- perhaps the reason -- you attend games or watch them on TV, is that it helps you escape from whatever occupies your mind the rest of the week. You certainly don't want the issues of the day encroaching on your enjoyment. Published September 27, 2017

Illustration on the Vietnam War     The Washington Times

The Vietnam War revisited

Filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick have performed a vital public service in making their documentary "The Vietnam War" for the Public Broadcasting Service. Given the division that war caused in America, it is a pretty fair chronicling of the way things were a half-century ago. The film brought back a lot of mostly bad memories to people of my generation. Published September 25, 2017

Illustration on changing bad influences on the U.N. by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Finding use for a 'useless' U.N.

While campaigning for the presidency, Donald Trump more than once referred to the United Nations as a "useless" organization and "not a friend of democracy." Published September 20, 2017

One of 35 immigrants from 23 countries awaits the start of the naturalization ceremony that will transform them into American citizens at Northeast Jackson International Baccalaureate World Middle School in Jackson, Miss., Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. The immigrants underwent an extensive security check as well as study and testing on U.S. history, civics and government, as part of the requirements to earning citizenship documentation. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

The ignorant nation and its legacy

At a National Archives ceremony last Friday in Washington, D.C., 30 immigrants became naturalized U.S. citizens. In a video, President Trump encouraged them to embrace the "full rights, and the sacred duties, that come with American citizenship." Published September 18, 2017

Illustration on Trump's recent deal with congressional Democrats by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump's option play

What just happened? President Trump cut a deal with Democrats to pay for hurricane damage relief and raise the debt ceiling without getting anything in return, except the temporary avoidance of a government shutdown. How to describe this? Was it a sellout, or a pragmatic act? Published September 13, 2017

Illustration on corruption in Italy's support of refugees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Mafia and the migrants

I spotted them on my way to dinner with a friend near Castel Gandolfo. They are migrants from Africa, sitting by the side of the road outside a "temporary" residence that, for many, appears to have become permanent. They all have cellphones. They all seem oblivious to us as we pass by. Published September 11, 2017

In this file photo dated Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017, a Hungarian police officer stands guard at Serbia's border with Hungary near a makeshift camp for migrants in Horgos, Serbia.  The European Court of Justice on Wednesday Sept.6, 2017, rejected efforts by Hungary and Slovakia to stay out of a European Union scheme to relocate refugees. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic, FILE)

On taxes and immigration, look to Hungary

Congress has returned to Washington after another unearned vacation and faces at least two immediate challenges, in addition to the familiar ritual of raising the debt ceiling. Published September 6, 2017

Illustration on Tayyip Erdogan's incremental Islamicization of Turkey by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Turkey's choice: The past or the future?

Coming from the airport into this city of about 15 million people and 5 million cars, as my driver describes it, I pass ancient Roman ruins and blocks of upscale shops; an old hotel where Agatha Christie penned "Murder on the Orient Express," smoke shops and modest restaurants, and luxury car dealers. Published September 4, 2017

Armageddon postponed

North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un appears to have blinked and President Trump can claim a foreign policy victory and justification for his strategy. Published August 30, 2017

Sheriff Joe Arpaio

Pardoning Sheriff Arpaio

President Trump's pardon of Joe Arpaio, the former sheriff of Maricopa County, Ariz., has drawn predictable responses. The left, which long ago exceeded its sell-by date when it comes to ideas that work, denounced the decision as racist (that's all they have) and a perversion of justice. Some moderates, like Sen. John McCain and Sen. Jeff Flake, both Arizona Republicans, Speaker Paul Ryan, Wisconsin Republican, and former Florida Republican Gov. Jeb Bush, joined the critics. Published August 30, 2017

The Bottomless Pit of Afghanistan Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A pit of frustration in Afghanistan

President Trump is not the first U.S. leader to pivot when it comes to foreign policy. His speech Monday night before American military personnel at Fort Myer in Arlington, Va., was in stark contrast to his campaign pledge to put "America first" and his promise to avoid "foreign entanglements," as George Washington put it in his Farewell Address. Published August 23, 2017

Illustration on removing Confederate statues and monuments by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Historical hysteria

We will learn even less from history if we wipe it clean, as some are trying to do by removing statues of Confederate leaders whose beliefs about slavery and race most, including me, find offensive. Conversation beats censorship. Published August 21, 2017