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Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas is one of the most widely syndicated political columnists in America. Based in Washington, he is a wide-ranging social commentator, not a "beltway insider," who supports traditional conservative values and the American "can-do spirit." He'll take on virtually any topic, from the decline of the family to growing terrorism worldwide.

A columnist for 30 years, his latest book is "What Works: Common Sense Solutions for a Stronger America." Readers may email Mr. Thomas at [email protected].

Articles by Cal Thomas

ADVANCE FOR USE MONDAY, AUG. 21, 2017 AND THEREAFTER-A man shouts across the Wishkah River while incoherently talking to himself at Kurt Cobain Memorial Park in Aberdeen, Wash., Tuesday, June 13, 2017. Grays Harbor County lands near the top of all the lists no place wants to be on: drugs, alcohol, early death, child abuse, runaway rates of welfare that pull some out of poverty but trap others in a cycle of dependency. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Welfare reform again

When President Bill Clinton signed the welfare reform act in 1996, which he negotiated with House Speaker Newt Gingrich, the left claimed people would starve. They didn't. According to the nonpartisan Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, between 1996 and 2000, the employment rate for single mothers increased from 63 percent to 76 percent. Published April 16, 2018

Civil liberties lawyer Alan Dershowitz. (Fox News) ** FILE **

Searching and seizing

'The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." — Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution Published April 11, 2018

Illustration on changing course in Syria by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Syria, Donald Trump and isolationism

The isolationist spirit — a reluctance to become involved in foreign entanglements — goes back in U.S. history to Thomas Paine and his 1776 pamphlet " Common Sense" and to George Washington's 1796 Farewell Address. Published April 9, 2018

In this combination photo, Fox News personality Laura Ingraham speaks at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland on July 20, 2016, left, and David Hogg, a student survivor from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., speaks at a rally for common sense gun legislation in Livingston, N.J. on  Feb. 25, 2018. Some big name advertisers are dropping Ingraham after she publicly criticized Hogg, a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas school on social media. The online home goods store Wayfair, travel website TripAdvisor and Rachel Rays dog food Nutrish all said they are removing their support from Ingraham.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, left, and Rich Schultz)

Free speech takes another hit

Fox News host Laura Ingraham has apologized, as has the network, for nothing more serious than her tweet: "David Hogg rejected by four colleges to which he applied and whines about it. (Dinged by UCLA with a 4.1 GPA totally predictable given acceptance rates.)" Published April 4, 2018

Officer Jeremy Nelson patrols the reflecting pool as snow comes down in front of the US Capitol, in Washington, DC., Tuesday, December 10, 2013.  (Andrew S Geraci/The Washington Times)

What's wrong in Washington (and America)

At dinner with friends, I was asked what is wrong with Washington. The question presumes a standard by which "wrong" can be defined. Published April 2, 2018

John Bolton Portrait Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

John Bolton's enemies

Among the several ways to judge a person's fitness for office are the enemies he has made. Published March 28, 2018

Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Fla., speaks at the podium where he is joined by students and parents from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland., Fla., Friday, March 23, 2018, during a news conference about gun violence on Capitol Hill in Washington, ahead of the Saturday March For Our Lives. With Rep. Deutch are Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Mark Kelly, and Gabby Giffords. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The budget and national insecurity

President Trump wants us to believe that the ridiculous 2,232-page spending bill passed by Congress, but unread by most members, is a matter of "national security," because it has money to rebuild the military. He said he had to sign the bill for that reason, but promised never to sign one like it again. We'll see. Published March 26, 2018

Illustration on Vladimir Putin by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

The Russian selection

Perhaps Vladimir Putin was using his experience meddling in U.S. elections to meddle in his own. Published March 21, 2018

Illustration on the FACT Act by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The unbalanced California 'FACT Act'

On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments over whether pro-life pregnancy help centers in California should be required to post notices informing women of the availability of abortions elsewhere. The pregnancy help centers are contesting the law, disingenuously named the California Reproductive FACT (Freedom, Accountability, Comprehensive Care and Transparency) Act, claiming it violates their free speech rights, as well as undercuts the reason for their existence. Published March 19, 2018

Climate Change Rations Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Apocalypse now?

Since the beginning of recorded history there have been end-of-the-world predictions. In recent years we have had radio preachers, politicians and scientists declare with certainty that the world would soon end, either because of our decadent lifestyle, or because of "global warming," now known as "climate change." Published March 14, 2018

Illustration on Trump's critics and his success by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How Trump critics respond to success

President Trump's critics, who include many establishment Republicans, are finding themselves left with few issues given the president's recent string of successes. Published March 12, 2018

North Korea's Broken Promises Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Only fools believe North Korea

To what shall North Korea's latest pronouncement to give up its nuclear weapons in exchange for certain "security" guarantees be compared? Published March 7, 2018

FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2002 file photo, composer Harvey Schmidt appears at the final performance of "The Fantasticks," at the Sullivan Street Playhouse in New York. Schmidt died Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018 at the age of 88. (AP Photo/Tina Fineberg, File)

Harvey Schmidt was fantastic

You wonder how these things begin. For Harvey Schmidt, co-writer of the longest-running musical in history — who died last week at 88 — and his collaborator, Tom Jones, it began when the two were students at the University of Texas. Published March 5, 2018

Donald the Dragon Slayer Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Boldly going like no president before

Of all the promises candidate Donald Trump made during the 2016 presidential campaign, none will be more difficult to fulfill than cutting the size and cost of the federal government. That's because Congress, which must decide whether to keep a federal agency, has the final word in such matters and spending, especially since spending in one's home state or district, is what keeps so many of them in office. Who doubts that self-preservation is the primary objective of most members of Congress? Published February 28, 2018

Illustration on police protection of schools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why deterrence can work

MIAMI — The list of failures in the Feb. 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, are becoming legion. If any or all of those failures had been addressed, 17 students and teachers might be alive today. Published February 26, 2018

Illustration on interference in the voting process by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Media bias and the vote

The indictment of 13 Russians and three companies for allegedly creating a "sophisticated network designed to subvert the 2016 election and to support the Trump campaign" is only half the story. While the Justice Department targeted foreign influence, others could have easily said something about the role U.S. media played in influencing the election's outcome. While not criminal, the U.S. media should at least be shamed for its unrestrained bias for and against both left and right. Published February 21, 2018

People participate in a candlelight vigil in memory of the 17 students and faculty who were killed in the Wednesday mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Monday, Feb. 19, 2018. Nikolas Cruz, a former student, was charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder on Thursday. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Warning signs ignored again

Reaction to the latest school shooting in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 people dead and many more wounded begins at the wrong end. It's not about passing more gun laws, which people intent on breaking existing laws will not obey; rather it is about heeding warning signs and doing something before it is too late. Published February 19, 2018

Illustration on welfare and poverty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The war that never ends

There is a war that has lasted longer than the one in Afghanistan. It is the so-called "war on poverty," launched by President Lyndon Johnson during his State of the Union address on Jan. 8, 1964. Published February 14, 2018

Bipartisan Act Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Drowning in debt

In "Hamlet," Shakespeare pens one of the most familiar lines — and best advice — ever written. Before Laertes leaves for Paris, his father, Polonius, tells him: "Neither a borrower nor a lender be " Published February 12, 2018

ADVANCE FOR RELEASE SUNDAY, DEC. 31, 2017 AND THEREAFTER -FILE - In this Saturday, April 26, 2014 file photo, the sun shines through concertina wire on a fence at the Louisiana State Penitentiary in Angola, La. Nearly two years after the January 2016 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that prison inmates who killed as teenagers are capable of change and may deserve eventual freedom, the question remains unresolved: Which ones should get a second chance? (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Prison reform, the time is now

It didn't seem to fit in President Trump's State of the Union address, perhaps something tossed in at the last minute, like a garnish. But there it was: "As America regains its strength, opportunity must be extended to all citizens. That is why this year we will embark on reforming our prisons, to help former inmates who have served their time get a second chance at life." Published February 7, 2018