Cheryl K. Chumley | Stories - Washington Times
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Cheryl K. Chumley

Cheryl K. Chumley

Cheryl Chumley is online opinion editor for The Washington Times, the author of “The Devil in DC: Winning Back the Country From the Beast in Washington” and of "Police State USA: How Orwell’s Nightmare is Becoming Our Reality," and a 2008-2009 Robert Novak journalism fellow with The Fund for American Studies. Email her at [email protected]. 

Articles by Cheryl K. Chumley

Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson stunned Washington last week when he said his department's funding was "simply not sustainable." (Associated Press)

Rex Tillerson: The man with a mission from God

Between Rex Tillerson and now, his wife, Renda St. Clair, liberals must be in a complete uproar. His wife, it seems, suggested his appointment to secretary of state was God's will/ Published March 22, 2017

FBI Director James Comey takes a break after three hours of testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, March 20, 2017, before the House Intelligence Committee hearing on allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Comey: Media's 'wrong' a lot -- but correcting is not FBI job

James Comey, FBI director, said a mouthful about the media during congressional testimony about Russia earlier this week, making clear it wasn't his agency's job to correct the press on printed or published errors -- but also saying bluntly: Boy, they make a lot. True, but sitting idly by and letting the false narrative go forth isn't exactly praise-worthy, either. Published March 21, 2017

This Dec. 9, 2016 image released by NBC shows Arnold Schwarzenegger, the new boss of "The New Celebrity Apprentice," at a press junket in Universal City, Calif.  Schwarzenegger said Friday that he's through with "The New Celebrity Apprentice," and he's blaming President Donald Trump for the television reality show's recent poor performance. The former California governor said he wouldn't mind working with NBC and producer Mark Burnett again "on a show that doesn't have this baggage." (Paul Drinkwater/NBC via AP)

Hey, Ahh-nold: Trump won. Let it go

Arnold Schwarzenegger -- remember him? He used to star in some of Hollywood's hottest films, some decades back -- has taken to Twitter with a 40-second rant against President Donald Trump. It's self-promotion, at its worst. Published March 21, 2017

FILE- In this Dec. 15, 2016, file photo, Judge Andrew Napolitano waits for an elevator in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York. Fox News Channel has pulled legal analyst Napolitano from the air after disavowing his on-air claim that British intelligence officials had helped former President Barack Obama spy on Donald Trump.  The move was first reported by The Los Angeles Times on Monday, March 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Fox benches Napolitano amid wiretap fizzle

The fallout from President Donald Trump's wiretapping claims against Barack Obama have turned from the White House toward Fox News, and now, according to several reports, Andrew Napolitano, the outlet's frequent "Judge Napolitano" legal commentator, has been benched. Eh. He'll be back. And back soon -- rightly so. Published March 21, 2017

In this June 22, 2016 photo, Border Patrol agents stands near a border structure in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

Illegal? Travis County, Texas, is the place to be

The Department of Homeland Security is playing the shaming game, and releasing name of jails in local communities that won't get in lawful line and honor detainer requests from the federal authorities. Good. And the award for Best Place to Get Arrested as an Illegal is ... Travis County, Texas. Published March 21, 2017

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks with reporters at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, March, 14, 2017. The White House and Republican leaders in Congress are scrambling to shore up support for their health care bill after findings from the Congressional Budget Office estimated that 14 million people would lose insurance coverage in the first year alone under the GOP replacement for Obamacare. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

So you want truth, Schumer? You first

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, never one to shy from a chance to showcase the Republicans as bad for the people, has now stepped forward to use the president's previous wiretapping claims and Monday's hearings on Capitol Hill about said wiretapping to demand Donald Trump admit he was wrong -- right now, to the American people and to Barack Obama. What a bloviating showboat. Published March 20, 2017

FILE - In this Tuesday, March 7, 2017, file photo, House Intelligence Committee Ranking Member Adam Schiff, D-Calif., speaks with reporters about the committee's investigation into Russia's involvement in the recent U.S. presidential election, on Capitol Hill in Washington. On Sunday, March 19, 2017, Schiff and House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, R-Calif., were among a number of lawmakers who said on news shows they had seen no evidence that the Obama administration ordered wiretaps on Donald Trump during the campaign. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

Schiff's disingenuous try at painting Trump as dangerous

For those who didn't have time to tune in to the House Intelligence Committee's hearing for the FBI's James Comey and the NSA's Michael Rogers, here's a hint of what you've missed: a Democratic take-down attempt of President Donald Trump. A Democratic ploy to showcase the president as dangerous to America's security. Published March 20, 2017

Trump wiretap claims? Well, Obama did secretly spy

Sen. Susan Collins, Republican from Maine, took to national television airwaves over the weekend to insist that President Donald Trump explain why he decided it was OK to accuse Barack Obama of wiretapping his conversations in Trump Tower. Here, let me help: Because Obama's White House was tapping into people all the time. Published March 20, 2017

A performer dressed as Hefty Smurf gives a high-five to Jack Gall, 13, as John Gall, right, looks on at Children's Hospital in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pa. on March 17, 2017. Actor and Pittsburgh native Joe Manganiello, not pictured, visited patients the hospital with Hefty, the character he voices in "Smurfs: The Lost Village." Manganiello also hosted a screening of the film at the hospital prior to its April 7 nationwide release. Gall's father John is also pictured. (Andrew Rush/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via AP)

Smile: The U.N. says you must

Today is the International Day of Happiness. That's according to the United Nations, which decreed the day back in 2013 and has used all its global might to enforce its provisions on an annual basis since. So go forth and be happy. Dammit. Published March 20, 2017

A music fan waves a Mexican national flag during the performance of Colombian rock ban Doctor Krapula at the 18th annual Vive Latino music festival in Mexico City, Saturday, March 18, 2017. The two-day rock festival is one of the most important and longest running of Mexico. (AP Photo/Christian Palma)

Fearful Mexicans scrap Cinco de Mayo

A Cinco de Mayo celebration called El Carnaval de Puebla, held each year in Philadelphia, has just been suddenly canceled -- and in short order, it's due to President Donald Trump. The normal and usual Mexican holiday participants are worried they might get deported -- and this is a good thing. Published March 20, 2017

This undated image provided by the U.S. Marine Corps shows a billboard that the Corps will post as part of a new recruitment advertisement campaign, meant to draw millennials by showing Marines as not only strong warriors but good citizens. "Battles Won" is the name of the campaign that includes TV ads and online clips of Marines unloading "Toys for Tots" boxes and real video of a Marine veteran tackling an armed robber. The military's smallest branch is also considering replacing its iconic slogan, "The Few. The Proud. The Marines." (U.S. Marine Corps via AP)

Marines, sadly, go soft for snowflakes

Marines, long regarded the tough guy fighting force of the United States -- the branch above politically correct reproach, the one able to withstand the progressive onslaughts that have permeated America's military in recent years -- have a new, tailor-made message for millennials. And it's a bit on the softy side. Published March 17, 2017

In this Jan. 5, 2017, photo, a painting by David Pulphus hangs in a hallway displaying paintings by high school students selected by their member of congress on Capitol Hill in Washington. A GOP congressman reported Jan. 13 that a painting stirring controversy on Capitol Hill will be taken down on Tuesday as a result of a review by the agency responsible for maintaining the Capitol complex determined it violated rules for a student arts competition. The painting depicts Ferguson, Missouri, with the image of a pig in a police uniform aiming a gun at a protester. The painting was among hundreds completed by high school students that are featured in a tunnel leading to the Capitol. (AP Photo/Zach Gibson)

Anti-police 'pig' art must go -- and stay gone

A federal judge is poised to issue a ruling any day now about the fate of a controversial piece of art in the U.S. Capitol that shows a policeman as a pig -- and the fact that this even has to go to court shows not just the power, but the utter ridiculousness, of the progressive movement in America, circa 2017. Congress should not be in the business of promoting the idea that police are pigs. Published March 17, 2017

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., a vociferous opponent of the House Republican healthcare reform plan, referring to it as "Obamacare light," discusses the bill before a TV interview on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March, 15, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Civil asset forfeiture reform rears again -- thank goodness

Sen. Rand Paul and Rep. Tim Walberg, both Republicans, have re-introduced one of the most important pieces of legislation to come forward in decades that will secure the rights of Americans to be safe in their possessions and properties -- a rollback to civil asset forfeiture laws. Speedy passage is needed. Published March 17, 2017

From left, Marina Aleixo tends to the children's table as Diana Otongo, Umar Choudry and Jonas Mphiri serve themselves a meal of rice, salmon and beef stroganoff inside Aleixo and Choudry's Minneapolis home on March 5, 2017. Immigrants themselves, Aleixo and Choudry are inviting immigrant and refugee families to dinner at their home more frequently. "These kind of initiatives can help us gain a better understanding of each other," Aleixo said.   (Evan Frost/Minnesota Public Radio via AP)

Gag me with the media spin on falling food stamps

And leftists say there's no such thing as a left-leaning media -- that media bias is all in conservatives' heads. Well, look at this headline, from The Washington Post, about the drop in numbers of illegals applying for food stamp benefits: "Immigrants are going hungry so Trump won't deport them." Published March 17, 2017

President Donald Trump arrives for a St. Patrick's Day reception in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, March 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

No, Julie Andrews, cutting 'the arts' does not kill Bert and Ernie

So President Donald Trump wants to abolish the National Endowment for the Arts -- and now the artsy world is in a panic, as if the White House proposal means the end of creativity everywhere. Listen up, Left: People painted before the NEA, you know. Published March 17, 2017

President Trump makes a gesture of embrace at a huge rally in Nashville, Tennessee earlier this month. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

What, now Trump's to be taken seriously? How convenient

Here's a question that's floating in the winds of judicial clamp-down on President Donald Trump's latest travel ban: Since when did anybody on the left, to include activist judges, consider Trump and his blunt style of speaking anything but clownish in the first place? Published March 16, 2017

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., left, confers with the committee's ranking member, Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March, 14, 2017, prior to the start of the committee's hearing on the investigation of nude photographs of female Marines and other women that were shared on the Facebook page "Marines United."  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

John McCain's jump the shark moment

Sen. John McCain, the Republican from Arizona, apparently facing a brief lull in all the television interviews he's given lately to attack President Donald Trump, took to the Senate floor to deliver a scathing verbal assault on a fellow senator, another Republican, this one, Rand Paul from Kentucky. Published March 16, 2017