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Guy Taylor

Guy Taylor

Guy Taylor is the National Security Team Leader at The Washington Times, overseeing the paper's State Department, Pentagon and intelligence coverage. He has reported from dozens of countries and been a guest on the BBC, CNN, NPR, FOX, C-SPAN and The McLaughlin Group.

A series Mr. Taylor led on the motives and fallout around Russia's attempts to influence the 2016 U.S. election was recognized with a Gerald R. Ford Journalism Prize for Distinguished Reporting on the Presidency, and a Society for Professional Journalists award. In 2012, he won a Virginia Press Association award for reporting on political, economic and security developments in Mexico.

Prior to joining The Times in 2011, Mr. Taylor's was supported by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and the Fund For Investigative Journalism. He wrote for a variety publications, from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch to Salon, Reason, Prospect, the Daily Star of Beirut, the Jerusalem Post and the St. Petersburg Times. He also served as an
editor at World Politics Review, wrote for America's Quarterly and produced videos and feature stories for Agence France-Presse.

Mr. Taylor is a graduate of Clark University and was part of a team who won a Society of Professional Journalists award for their reporting on the terrorist attacks of 9/11.

He can be reached at gtaylor@washingtontimes.com.

Latest Podcast Episodes for Inheriting Chaos

Articles by Guy Taylor

In this Feb. 3, 2007 file photo, a technician works at the Uranium Conversion Facility just outside the city of Isfahan, Iran, 255 miles (410 kilometers) south of the capital Tehran.  (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi, File)   **FILE**

Will Biden lift sanctions on Iran? Crisis Group says he should

Iran has engaged in "worrying violations" of the 2015 nuclear deal, including uranium enrichment at "a level perilously close to weapons-grade," according to a prominent international think tank, which argues the incoming Biden administration should respond not by punishing Tehran, but by moving quickly to revive the accord. Published January 15, 2021

President-elect Joe Biden has chosen veteran diplomat William Burns to be his CIA director. (AP Photo/Saurabh Das)

Lifelong diplomat who backed Iran diplomacy picked to head CIA

President-elect Joseph R. Biden has picked a State Department lifer and a staunch advocate of diplomacy with Iran to head the CIA, tapping former Ambassador William Burns to head the spy agency after a tumultuous four years under President Trump. Published January 11, 2021

In this photo provided by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, center, attends the ruling party congress in Pyongyang, North Korean, Saturday, Jan. 9, 2021. Independent journalists were not given access to cover the event depicted in this image distributed by the North Korean government. The content of this image is as provided and cannot be independently verified. Korean language watermark on image as provided by source reads: "KCNA" which is the abbreviation for Korean Central News Agency. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)

North Korea issues threat to U.S. as message to Biden

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un is marking the impending end of the Trump administration early by leveling a major threat to expand Pyongyang's nuclear weapons and missile programs unless the incoming Biden administration dials back America's "hostile" policy toward North Korea. Published January 10, 2021

China, Iran and Russia criticized the U.S. after a group of pro-Trump forces stormed the Capitol. Some U.S. voices fretted openly that the siege presented a propaganda windfall for foreign adversaries. (ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOGRAPHS)

For foes abroad, deadly Capitol clashes prove a tempting target

China called it a "collapse" of the U.S. political system that would "destroy" America's global image. Iran went with the "annihilation of Western democracy," while Russia said the situation was proof the U.S. system is "no longer charting the course" for the world. Published January 7, 2021

U.S. Capitol Police hold protesters at gun-point near the House Chamber inside the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Around the world, denunciations and delight over U.S. Capitol clash

Stunned U.S. allies and adversaries alike weighed in on the chaos that engulfed the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, as images of the confrontation between President Trump's supporters and law enforcement led virtually every news website around the globe. Published January 6, 2021

In this photo provided by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un attends a ruling party congress in Pyongyang, North Korea Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2021. Independent journalists were not given access to cover the event depicted in this image distributed by the North Korean government. The content of this image is as provided and cannot be independently verified. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)

Kim Jong-un makes no mention of Trump, nukes or Biden in party speech

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un made no mention of denuclearization, the United States or President Trump in a rare and frank public speech that opened the first meeting of the ruling Workers' Party Congress in nearly five years in Pyongyang this week. Published January 6, 2021

Saudis and Qataris reach possible breakthrough to end GCC flap: Officials

Kuwait said Monday that Saudi Arabia had agreed to reopen its airspace and land and sea borders to Qatar in an apparent breakthrough toward resolving the diplomatic fight between wealthy Gulf Arab monarchies that has vastly complicated the Trump administration's diplomacy. Published January 4, 2021