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Give Greece due for WWII victory

Victor Davis Hanson's "Remembering Stalingrad 75 years later" (Web, Nov. 7) is an excellent narrative about a critical event in history. However, it leaves the impression that Germany's dividing its army between Stalingrad and the Russian oil fields caused its defeat and marked the turning point in World War II. Other historians differ. Published November 15, 2017

Rebuild U.S. military now

The Virginia election loss of Ed Gillespie showed voter frustration with our do-nothing Congress, not frustration with the hard-working President Donald Trump, who is making America great again. The Virginia GOP must rebuild with the president's help and elect Corey Stewart for senator in 2018. He is the best hope Republicans have to drain the swamp of Northern Virginia and represent true conservative values. Published November 15, 2017

The Supreme Court in Washington is seen here at sunset on Oct. 10, 2017. (Associated Press) **FILE**

California and the Constitution

There's a lot about the law and the Constitution that California does not understand, particularly the First Amendment. The U.S. Supreme Court, perhaps willing to offer the needed tutorial in the law, has agreed to hear a legal challenge to a California law requiring private pro-life pregnancy counseling centers to tell their clients that the state will provide an abortion instead. Published November 14, 2017

President Trump has undermined the judiciary by using his pardon powers on former Sheriff Joe Arpaio and has hurt the First Amendment by berating news outlets or calling them "fake," according to some of the Democrats' articles of impeachment. (Associated Press/File)

Home, with a side of bacon

President Trump is home from the hill, and Thanksgiving isn't far away, but the only words of gratitude from the liberals and the harder left is, "Thanks for nothing." That's all the president gets from his sore-loser critics following a whirlwind diplomatic and deal-making excursion through Asia. When they lock their partisan opposition in concrete and vow never to say an encouraging word, Americans are reminded why they voted to "Put America first." Published November 14, 2017

Don't write Moore off yet

If Republican Senate nominee Judge Roy S. Moore sexually abused four women and one was only 14 years old at the time, he should withdraw from the U.S. Senate race immediately. But that's a big "if." After being silent for more than 30 years — during which time Mr. Moore ran for many offices — these women are accusing Mr. Moore now, when it is too late under Alabama law for another Republican to be put on the ballot. If he withdraws, the election of a Democrat is guaranteed. That smells. Published November 14, 2017

Left's gun fix makes no sense

Many liberals and the Democratic Party like to insult Christians and our belief in God, Jesus Christ and prayer ("Mocking prayer after the massacre," Web, Nov. 8). The political left's God truly is big government and self-adoration. Published November 14, 2017

Former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at the Vestavia Hills Public library, Saturday, Nov. 11, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. According to a Washington Post story Nov. 9, an Alabama woman said Moore made inappropriate advances and had sexual contact with her when she was 14. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

The unraveling culture

The times are not just "a'changing," as Bob Dylan sang of them — but they're unraveling. Dismembering of the culture is at hand, and only the blind and foolish cannot see it. History is trashed and anyone who objects is a bigot, or worse. Pale-skinned Americans are vilified for living innocent lives, exploiting "white privilege." Bulls-eyes are painted on the backs of conservatives and Republicans because, well, they're conservatives and Republicans. Every man is a sexual predator, or will be soon. Throwing brickbats at unpopular targets can be great fun, but what goes around comes around. Published November 13, 2017

Activists with Planned Parenthood demonstrated in Washington on Oct. 20, 2017, in support of a pregnant 17-year-old being held in a Texas facility for unaccompanied immigrant children to obtain an abortion. (Associated Press) **FILE**

The inconvenience of a conscience

Abortion is the issue that will divide America forever because it's fundamentally an issue of conscience vs. convenience, with no victory for either side in prospect. A conscience is difficult to silence and everybody likes convenience. There's no better snapshot of the chasm between red America and blue America. Published November 13, 2017

Bush wrong to jump on Trump

That former President George W. Bush would speak out against a sitting president now, and never did so during the Obama era, is indicative of why Donald Trump was elected president in the first place. Today's Republican-establishment politicians are the latest exemplar of why Washington is so often called a swamp, with self-aggrandizement and self-enrichment making "the people" sound like some sweet, old-fashioned notion. Published November 13, 2017

NFL, look to Canada, U.K.

Maybe the NFL ought to take a page out of the books of other professional sports, those that manage their pre-game national anthems with grace. The England and German national soccer teams not only sing their respective anthems but recently also wear arm bands with poppies on them. The English teams all wear poppies on their uniforms for the week prior to their national veterans/remembrance day. Hockey Night in Canada had a solemn tribute to all veterans prior to last Saturday's game, and it included a pipe band and a vignette about soldiers from prior conflicts. Even the flamboyant Don Cherry wore a subdued blue blazer with a Royal Canadian Legion emblem, as well as a poppy — as all Canadian coaches wear for this hallowed period. Published November 13, 2017

Former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore waits to speak the Vestavia Hills Public library, Saturday, Nov. 11, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. According to a Thursday, Nov. 9 Washington Post story an Alabama woman said Moore made inappropriate advances and had sexual contact with her when she was 14. Moore has denied the allegations. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Roy Moore's day in court

Sometimes a lynch mob gets a guilty man, but it's nevertheless an unspeakable evil. The accusations against Roy Moore in Alabama are sordid and serious, but so far they're accusations, not charges, and he is entitled to his day in court. That day will be Dec. 12, and the jurors, in a special election to replace Jeff Sessions in the U.S. Senate, will be the voters of Alabama. Published November 12, 2017

Eating, drinking and merriment in Maine

The voters of Maine gave themselves a Christmas present last week, voting to expand Medicaid under Obamacare, and doing it by referendum to prevent Gov. Paul LePage, a Republican, from taking it away from them. The legislature had tried five times to give such a fine present to Maine voters, and five times Mr. LePage vetoed the present because he said Maine couldn't afford it. Published November 12, 2017

Decades of useless climate parties

The climate warriors are holding yet another global warming jamboree, this time at the COP 23 Fiji UN Climate Change Conference in Bonn, Germany ("US at climate talks may be like unhappy dinner guest," Web, Nov. 9). We can expect an orchestrated flood of frightening forecasts to support their alarmist agenda. Published November 12, 2017

Pharma not in the health business

The first thing you have to get your head around is that health care is not about health ("Doctors fear obesity diagnosis will embarrass patients," Web, Nov. 7). Health insurance is in fact "disease" insurance, and only rarely does it have anything to do with your health. Doctors have not been trained to promote health, do not have a clue as to how to do so and basically are where they are because of the ability to perform well on exams and ultimately to learn to diagnose disease and then match that disease to a menu of drugs. This is what a patient pays for. If you raise your expectations, you are going to be disappointed in a big way. Published November 12, 2017

IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR REDFIN - A Redfin real estate yard sign is pictured in front of a house in Seattle on Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017. (Stephen Brashear/AP Images for Redfin)

Searching for loopholes

Home is where the heart it is, but home is where there's a big hole in tax receipts. The home mortgage interest deduction, which enables mortgage holders to write off the interest payments on their properties, will subtract $1.3 trillion from the federal government's balance sheet over the course of the next decade. Published November 9, 2017

National Space Council will meet Thursday. Government officials and entrepreneurs will be in attendance. The event will be livestreamed.
NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, in the middle of a Christmas Eve space walk, outside the International Space Station in 2013. (NASA)

High times and matrimony at NASA

Some marriages are said to be made in heaven, and now certain Democratic senators want to make sure that some marriages be recognized in space. Heaven can wait. These senators object to President Trump's nominee to be the administrator of NASA because he, like most Americans, thinks the ladies make the most appropriate brides. Published November 9, 2017

Boko Haram means U.S. in Africa

Several weeks back, when four brave American service members lost their lives in Niger, the question asked by many was, What are U.S. forces doing in Africa? Published November 9, 2017

China bigger threat than Cuba

The Trump administration has issued new restrictions on Americans visiting communist Cuba. Americans will not be allowed to do business with certain hotels, stores or other establishments that have ties to the Cuban military or security services. But why doesn't the Trump administration place the same types of sanctions on communist China? A lot of hotels, stores and other businesses are owned by the Chinese military and Communist Party there. Why the hypocrisy? Published November 9, 2017

Uranium none

Sensations that explode with a flash and a bang seize public attention, but the echo doesn't last forever. Charges of Russian collusion in the 2016 presidential election that lit up the night sky in the spring are fading now with the colors of autumn. But details emerging from cracks and crevices of the Obama administration demand attention. Published November 8, 2017

In this Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017 photo, Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., addresses the Northam For Governor election night party at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017. Democratic candidate Ralph Northam won Virginia's race for governor. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

The real pain coming

The Republicans can't say they didn't deserve the spanking they got Tuesday night. The results in Virginia in particular were a wake-up call, and the Republicans have a talent for sleeping through the noise of an alarm clock. The Grumpy Old Party was cruising for a bruising, and it got one. Did the elephant learn anything? Published November 8, 2017