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A First Amendment threat

The U.S. Supreme Court is currently considering a case, the National Institute of Family Life Advocates (NIFLA) v. Becerra. From all indications, virtually none of the American public is aware of this vitally important case. Published January 17, 2018

Finding solutions for chronic disease

Imagine if millions of people drowned each year due to lack of aquatic skills and we, as a society, thought it reasonable to invest most resources into finding a cure for human drowning instead of teaching people how to swim properly. Unfortunately we are doing something similar with chronic disease. Published January 16, 2018

This frame from video released by the Chelsea Manning Senate campaign on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018 shows Chelsea Manning in a campaign video. Manning on Sunday confirmed via Twitter that she is a candidate for U.S. Senate. (Chelsea Manning For US Senate via AP)

Seeking refuge in the U.S. Senate

Chelsea Manning, who used to think she was Bradley Manning, and who was once a private first class in the U.S. Army before he became a traitor, now thinks he can be a U.S. senator from Maryland. Maryland may not be quite that deep shade of blue, but it's a brave new era in the Democratic Party, where feverish Democrats think Donald Trump is insane and Bradley Manning is a woman because he says he is. Published January 16, 2018

Not all immigrants are the same

The latest dust-up concerning President Trump and immigration reminds me that believing Sen. Durbin's statement requires an ideological imperative. However, in general, modern Western minds usually fail to recognize the colonial period as merely an interruption in millennia of tribal warfare. When the colonialists left, these people groups unwrapped the gift of freedom to rediscover the prehistory norms of crushing civil wars, murderous political intrigues, and pandemics of disease and starvation created by ruling elites from the ascendant tribes as they again strove for power by extinguishing their rivals. Published January 16, 2018

Trump's comment not racist

A lot of people are taking President Trump's "sh—hole countries" comment out of context and cashing in on it for their own glory ("Hillary Clinton condemns Trump's 'ignorant,' 'racist' 'sh—hole' comment," Web, Jan. 12). I am an African, and I can tell you, Mr. Trump is not a racist. Those calling him one are the racists. For instance, will all those whites calling him a racist allow their children to marry black people? Or will they welcome black sons- and daughters-in-law in their houses? How many black people occupy significant positions in their employ? These are questions for thought. Published January 15, 2018

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks at the National Governors Association special session called "Collaborating to Create Tomorrow's Global Economy" in Providence, R.I., July 14, 2017. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press via AP) ** FILE **

A lesson from Canada

Talking the talk is easy. Walking the walk is not so easy. Justin Trudeau, the prime minister of Canada, thought he could take a shot at the Americans, and Donald Trump in particular, for its determination to get out-of-control immigration under something resembling control. Lesson apparently learned. Published January 15, 2018

Left needs new election message

I have a suggestion for the National Democratic Party's 2018- and 2020-election message. Back in 1987, I heard Bill Clinton give a speech in which he said something I really agreed with. He said people have rights and responsibilities. Yet Democrats, he said, seem to focus too heavily on their own "rights" and seem to believe that they shouldn't (and don't) have any "responsibilities." By contrast, he said, Republicans seem to focus too heavily on their "responsibilities" and seem to believe that they shouldn't and don't have any "rights." Published January 15, 2018

'Refugee funds' don't go to Palestinians

The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) has exacerbated rather than helped the problems of refugees who still languish in squalid camps after 70 years ("The faded Palestinian issue," Web, Jan. 10). Published January 14, 2018

TV doesn't qualify Oprah for president

In discussing voter psychology, author Aldous Huxley said in a 1958 interview, "A democracy depends on the individual voter making an intelligent and rational choice for what he regards as his enlightened self-interest " Conversely, according to Huxley, TV and radio advertising experts "try to bypass the rational side and appeal directly to these unconscious forces below the surfaces, so that you are, in a way, making nonsense of the whole democratic procedure, which is based on conscious choice on rational ground." Published January 14, 2018

Climate scientists blowing hot air

Why do we keep listening to so-called "experts" who continue to change their story on climate change? As an engineer, I have found that if a set of data does not create to the results we observe, then there is a problem with the method of evaluation. The climate scientists have many years of data that they have used to predict climate-change results that have not been anywhere close to what has actually occurred. Published January 14, 2018

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks at a plaque dedication ceremony at the Central Park police precinct in New York, Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Greasy business in the Big Apple

You might have thought that Michael Bloomberg, with his mercifully futile crusades to protect everyone from their guns and their Big Gulps, would have set a record for grandstanding by a New York City mayor that would stand through the ages. Bill de Blasio, his hulking successor, is giving the diminutive Mr. Bloomberg a real run for his money, or, actually, your money. The Bloomberg grandstand was pushed into the shade. Published January 14, 2018

FILE - In this Dec. 15, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump sits with Attorney General Jeff Sessions during the FBI National Academy graduation ceremony in Quantico, Va. Late last year, lawyers for Trump expressed optimism that special counsel Robert Mueller was nearing the end of his probe of Russias interference in the 2016 election. But if there was hope in the White House that Trump might be moving past an investigation that has dogged his presidency from the start, 2018 is beginning without signs of abatement.(AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Trump in the outhouse

The civil society seems to be in better hands than anyone imagined. Unfortunately, the hands are those of snowflakes, easy to melt, and forever seeking a safe place where reality never intrudes. Published January 14, 2018

Beijing must stop flights now

At a time when the two Koreas are seeking to defuse tension through talks, Beijing's unilateral launch last week of controversial aviation routes constituted a provocation undermining regional security. On Jan. 4, China launched the northbound M503 flight route along with three east-west extension routes — without prior negotiations with Taiwan. We solemnly protest this reckless behavior, which raises concerns over cross-Strait stability and regional aviation safety. Published January 11, 2018

DACA good for politicians, not Trump

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) executive order isn't good for working-class America. It's a matter of simple supply and demand: More people available for jobs means lower wages and benefits for all. So why are politicians from both parties trying to jam it down our throats? Published January 11, 2018

Illustration Wind Power by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

A blow for energy security

The Trump administration took a blow this week from its own Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which ruled against further subsidies to financially ailing coal and nuclear plants. The blow was deserved. Published January 11, 2018

In this June 5, 2017, photo, a worker stacks merchandise outside a Walmart in Salem, N.H. Walmart is boosting its starting salary for U.S. workers to $11 an hour, giving a one-time $1,000 cash bonus to eligible employees and expanding its maternity and parental leave benefits. The retailer said Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, changes to its compensation and benefits policy will impact more than a million hourly workers in the U.S., with the wage increase effective next month. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

Tax cuts hit home

"Don't cut corporate taxes," they said. "The riches will only be used for share buybacks and executive perks," they said. "The workers won't actually benefit," they said. It's already looking like "they" didn't know what they were talking about. Published January 11, 2018

Left's rants just envy

Every day many Americans turn on the news or pick up a newspaper to see the Democrats on yet another rant against President Trump. These range from Nancy Pelosi demanding Mr. Trump be impeached, to the Democrats threatening to shut down the government if illegal aliens brought into our country as children are not given citizenship, to President Obama sitting on his high horse in another country disparaging our president. Published January 10, 2018

Trump hardly the corrupt one

Silence seems to be the tactic employed by the mainstream media in reporting on the unfolding news of the corruption in the Obama Justice Department. Maybe the two esteemed defenders of truth and justice, former Washington Post start reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, could enlighten us "deplorables" about the difference between Watergate and this scandal. Published January 10, 2018

Money transfer services allow Salvadorans and others under temporary protected status to send remittances, adding greatly to the gross domestic product of their home countries. (Associated Press/File)

The man who came to dinner

"A government bureau," Ronald Reagan once observed, "is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth." One current example of how government can bend language out of shape to preserve this artificial eternal life is the so-called "Temporary Protected Status" program. Published January 10, 2018

FILE - A June 25, 1999, file photo shows an enlargement of the U.S. Postal Service's stamp depicting Rosie the Riveter, in South Portland, Maine. A group wants to preserve a portion of the old Willow Run bomber plant and house a museum there dedicated to aviation and the countless Rosies across the country. Save the Bomber Plant officials have until Thursday, May 1, to raise the remainder of the $8 million needed to save the plant from demolition. (AP Photo/Joan Seidel, File)

When women were stronger

Researchers at the Max Planck Odense Center at the University of Southern Denmark have just discovered what everybody already knew (which is the most persuasive kind of research): Women are stronger than men, and they live longer, too. Published January 10, 2018