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Wesley Pruden

Wesley Pruden

American journalist legend and Vietnam War author James Wesley Pruden Jr. is Editor Emeritus of The Washington Times. Mr. Pruden’s first job in the newspaper business dates back to 1951 as a copyboy at the now defunct Arkansas Gazette where he later became a sportswriter and an assistant state editor. In 1982, he joined The Washington Times, four months after the paper began, as chief political correspondent. He became assistant managing editor in 1983, managing editor in 1985, and editor-in-chief in 1992. He retired in January 2008 and became editor-in-chief-emeritus. Mr. Pruden is known for his coverage of President Ronald Reagan. In 1991, he won the H.L. Mencken Prize for excellence in writing and commentary. Mr. Pruden writes a twice-weekly column on politics and national affairs for The Times.

Articles by Wesley Pruden

Rep. Maxine Waters, California Democrat (Associated Press) **FILE**

Barking mad and proud of it

Bonnie and Clyde sometimes called themselves "bank inspectors," but they were only kidding. The Palestinian Authority, the famous terrorist collective pretending to be a nation, collects $350 million from the U.S. Treasury every year to pay "salaries" to imprisoned terrorists, make love offerings to families of dead terrorists, celebrate terrorists as heroes, build monuments to dead criminals, and other bad things. And that's no joke. Published June 25, 2018

Sen. Chuck Schumer. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Democrats in a lather over the good news

Barack Obama is miffed because he thinks he collected the tinder for a booming economy, and events ignited a booming economy and the Donald gets the credit. That's pretty fanciful, as most economists will tell you. But now Mr. Obama can watch with a measure of pleasure as President Trump takes heat for using the Obama example of how to deal with the children brought by their families to the hell on the border. Published June 21, 2018

Stonewall Jackson. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Is California too much of a good thing?

Cutting Texas down to size is always a good thing to do, and if we have to carve up California to do it, well, that's life. The current popular notion in California would divide the Golden State into three new states, something that could be no longer be called Golden but perhaps Plastic, Pewter and Brass. Published June 18, 2018

Attorney General Jeff Sessions. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Sex, lies and betrayal at the FBI

If Jeff Sessions and Christopher Wray want to clean house at the FBI, they'll be well advised to pack a good lunch. Cleaning this house will be an all-day job. The agency under James B. Comey has been more corrupt than we thought. Published June 14, 2018

Muhammad Ali. (Corbis/Bettmann) ** FILE **

The rumble and the thrilla in Singapore

One hand giveth, the other taketh it away. President Trump, arriving in Singapore for his man-to-man with Kim Jong-un is, like nearly everyone else in town, giddy with anticipation. Published June 11, 2018

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein   Associated Press photo

Panic time at Camp Mueller

If this is June, it must be time to indict Paul Manafort again. The clock is ticking, and the tic-tocs are getting louder. Published June 7, 2018

Justice Anthony Kennedy. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The gay times roll, but the Supremes stop the music

The Supreme Court can sometimes twist itself into a pretzel to write law. The court on Monday upheld again the Constitutional principle that freedom of speech includes the right not to speak, but it all but apologized for saying so. Published June 4, 2018

Kim Yong-chul. (Associated Press)

The on-again, off-again Unpredictability Summit

Language is everything, as George Orwell reminded everyone, but today you can get words on the cheap and define them for yourself. A voice at the supermarket self-service check-out advises a shopper to "put your item in the bagging area." Does that mean the can of soup can go on the floor? The bag of potato chips on a nearby pastry bin? All are in the bagging "area." Published May 31, 2018

Robert E. Lee. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Confederate gift to the nation

Memorial Day is done and gone, and millions of Americans probably still don't know what it's supposed to be all about, beyond a picnic with hot dogs and six-packs in the park. Published May 28, 2018

A page from a Gutenberg Bible. (The Washington Times) ** FILE **

The wounded printed page strikes back

Fake news is everywhere, cluttering desktops, iPads, laptops, iPhones and all the other manifestations of the post-literate era when it's just too much trouble to find a reliable read. Published May 24, 2018

Satchel Paige. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Mr. Mueller's fishing pole needs a rest

Satchel Paige, the legendary master of the sinking curve ball and famous doctor of philosophy, had a few wise words that Robert Mueller could use just now: "Don't look back, something might be gaining on you." Published May 21, 2018

James Comey. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The collusion of lawyers is finally collapsing

Colluding, like canoodling, is all the rage. Robert Mueller, like a dog chasing his tail, has been trying for more than a year to find evidence that President Trump colluded with Vladimir Putin and the Russians to cook the 2016 election, which fate, providence, fortune and destiny decreed properly belonged to Hillary Clinton. Published May 17, 2018

Joe Biden. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Throwing rocks at the wrong villain

No man in America is more entitled to the nation's admiration and gratitude for sacrifice than John McCain. He's a hero in anybody's book, with no asterisks. An exclamation point, but no asterisk. Published May 14, 2018

Sen. Dianne Feinstein. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A little sanctimony in the Senate

Asking a U.S. senator for his views on morality is the ultimate fool's errand. As the innkeeper of "Fawlty Towers," the British sitcom, was fond of saying in moments of neighborly frustration, "you might as well ask the cat." Published May 10, 2018

Former Secretary of State John Kerry. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

John Kerry's 57 varieties of mischief

John Kerry has spent all his life getting things wrong. He came home from the war in Vietnam to trash as war criminals the men with whom he wore the colors. Published May 7, 2018

Dr. Joseph Goebbels, German minister of propaganda, addresses the 28th Brigade of Storm Troopers in the Lustgarten, Berlin on Aug. 26, 1934, before the demonstration at Coblenz. (AP Photo) ** FILE **

When there was no crying in the newsroom

Everybody wants to be a snowflake, now including even newspapermen. There's nothing inherently wrong with something called "World Press Freedom Day," but journalism has always been a contact sport. That's what made freedom of the press one of the best ideas the Founding Fathers ever came up with. Published May 3, 2018

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. (Associated Press)

The Iran nuclear deal begins to crumble

These are not happy days for the liberals, or progressives, or Democrats, or whatever they're calling themselves this week as, one by one, they stink up the familiar labels we've all used over the years. Published April 30, 2018

Jefferson Davis

When it's finally a friendly 'adios' to California

South Carolina and California don't seem to have a lot in common. South Carolina is small, prosperous, and cohesive, and California is large, all but bankrupt, and talking about splintering into an undetermined number of pieces. Published April 26, 2018

In this April 21, 2018, file photo, people watch a TV screen showing an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The signs read: "North Korea says it has suspended nuclear tests." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

A summit imperiled by Rocket Man's travel tribulations

"Just getting there, as Cunard once boasted of transatlantic crossings by ship, "is half the fun." The Atlantic is still there, but ocean liners are not, and almost the only way to cross the ocean sea now is by air. That's no fun at all. Dining aboard an ocean liner has been replaced by dining aloft, and you're lucky to get a pretzel or a stale cracker. Published April 23, 2018