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Wesley Pruden

Wesley Pruden

American journalist legend and Vietnam War author James Wesley Pruden Jr. is Editor Emeritus of The Washington Times. Mr. Pruden’s first job in the newspaper business dates back to 1951 as a copyboy at the now defunct Arkansas Gazette where he later became a sportswriter and an assistant state editor. In 1982, he joined The Washington Times, four months after the paper began, as chief political correspondent. He became assistant managing editor in 1983, managing editor in 1985, and editor-in-chief in 1992. He retired in January 2008 and became editor-in-chief-emeritus. Mr. Pruden is known for his coverage of President Ronald Reagan. In 1991, he won the H.L. Mencken Prize for excellence in writing and commentary. Mr. Pruden writes a twice-weekly column on politics and national affairs for The Times.

Articles by Wesley Pruden

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., holds a news conference to talk about the Democratic victory in the Alabama special election and to discuss the Republican tax bill, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

All the Democrats need now are more child molesters

The Democrats are feeling ruff, tuff and ready for the coming battle, and why shouldn't they? They proved in Alabama that with a little help from the other side, a Democrat can still defeat a child molester. Published December 14, 2017

Gloria Allred. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Big media's sad and extremely horrible week

Newspapermen were rarely whiners. Whining became fashionable only after "journalists" overran newsrooms. The best newspapermen, so the folk wisdom went, were Southerners, Jews and the Irish. Published December 11, 2017

James Comey (Associated Press) **FILE**

Robert Mueller's mighty tuna shrinks to a goldfish

Robert Mueller has the heart of a Las Vegas hooker and the guile of a New Orleans stripper. Not to push the metaphor too far, he's skilled at showing a little skin in a cloud of satin and lace, but never quite comes across with what the customer is paying for. Published December 4, 2017

Hedy Lamarr . (Associated Press) ** FILE **

When the prey becomes the predator

It's only a matter of time until the female of the species becomes predator, and is caught in the web of what the country preacher called "he'in and she'in," which has been the favorite game of men and women since Eve disdained perfection in the Garden of Eden. Published November 30, 2017

Charles Manson. (Associated Press)

The stink of the '60s lives with us still

Charles Manson, perhaps the most wicked killer since the Nazis set up their abattoir in the Germany of the previous century, is gone now, banished by death to a decision at the judgment bar of God, from which there is no appeal. But we can measure the damage he and his times did here on our patch of Earth. Published November 27, 2017

Roy Moore. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

No country for the squeamish of any age

America's the greatest land of all, but it's no country for sexually squeamish men, or women either, who are old enough to remember when dignity, decency and decorum were in season. Published November 23, 2017

Hillary and Bill Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Who knew so much testosterone rides the capital breeze?

These are not happy times for anybody. You can't keep up with the serial sexual offenders without a scorecard, and the list grows longer every day and all the claims won't fit on one scorecard. Seekers of cash settlements are advised to not take checks, and hurry to the bank and get in line before the cash runs out. Published November 20, 2017

Al Franken and Leeanne Tweeden

Gropergate! The halls of Congress under siege!

When I was a young reporter on a certain newspaper in the South, fresh on a new job, I took a fancy to a sweet and pretty young woman (that's how we talked in those days) working on what newspapers quaintly called "the Society pages." Published November 16, 2017

U.S. President Donald Trump arrives for a family photo during the ASEAN-U.S. 40th Anniversary commemorative Summit in Manila, Philippines, Monday, Nov. 13, 2017. (Manan Vatsyayana/Pool Photo via AP)

Coming home from an Asian tutorial

No one should be rude. Bad manners are not nice. Doesn't everybody's mama teach him that? Donald Trump certainly knows how to overdo it, but sometimes a president must be strategically rude to make a necessary point. Published November 13, 2017

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, is surrounded by reporters as she heads to go vote on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Saving opportunity from the Republican ruins

Second thoughts on the morning after the morning after are never as much fun as the champagne and caviar. Someone has to find the footnotes to the good news. Published November 9, 2017

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., speaks as Facebook's General Counsel Colin Stretch, Twitter's Acting General Counsel Sean Edgett, and Google's Law Enforcement and Information Security Director Richard Salgado, testify during a Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017, on more signs from tech companies of Russian election activity. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) ** FILE **

Never letting a massacre go to waste

Shooting up a church, even in a small town where a lot of people voted for Donald Trump, is a wicked thing to do. Everybody -- well, nearly everybody -- thinks so. But some people are determined not to let a convenient massacre go to waste. Published November 6, 2017

Special counsel Robert Mueller (Associated Press) **FILE**

A lot of noisy ado about nothing much yet

The mountain labored, and brought forth a mouse. It's a skinny little thing, not likely to frighten the most delicate milady. Robert Mueller is surely hard at work in his laboratory trying to breed a larger and more impressive creature. Published October 30, 2017

Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Hillary's very own Russian collusion connection

The Clinton can is as full of worms as her harshest critics ever imagined it was, and now the worms are turning. Washington is agog, liberal and conservative alike, as the details of the spreading story of confusion, chicanery and crime in Hillary's campaign for president emerge from the dark and fetid places so abundant in the capital. Published October 26, 2017

Former President Barack Obama. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Paying the price for Trump Derangement Syndrome

Fear and loathing can be great fun, but the Democrats are learning to their chagrin that resistance, estrangement and alienation can only take a party so far. Published October 23, 2017

Roger Goodell. (Associated Press)

The NFL owners with a playbook of their own

The owners of the National Football League finally came up with a playbook of their own. Beset by players who want to be political commentators who work from their knees, and by angry fans who only want to watch a football game without insult to the country they love, the owners consulted their playbook and think they can run out the clock. Published October 19, 2017

Foreign Minister Sebastian Kurz, head of Austrian People's Party, smiles in Vienna, Austria, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017, after the closing of the polling stations for the Austrian national elections. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader) ** FILE **

An Austrian thumb in the eye of the elites

The elites everywhere are having a hard time. When the peasants no longer salute, tug a forelock and obey with a whimper, even if with a snarl and a whine, you know you've lost your mojo. Published October 16, 2017

Cyrus Vance, Jr.

A Weinstein verdict to suit the Red Queen

Sometimes the lynch mob gets the guilty party, but that's not the way to run a railroad. We have laws, after all, even if some of them are subject to change. But due process is permanent. Published October 12, 2017

Barry Goldwater campaigning in 1964     Associated Press photo

Having fun with diagnosing the Donald

Witch doctors are not necessarily more skilled than psychiatrists and psychologists, but they're sometimes harder on the pocketbook. A group of "mental-health professionals" have offered to resolve the Donald Trump "problem" for free. In the learned and precise professional language of their trade, they think he's "nuts." Published October 9, 2017