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Wesley Pruden

Wesley Pruden

American journalist legend and Vietnam War author James Wesley Pruden Jr. is Editor Emeritus of The Washington Times. Mr. Pruden’s first job in the newspaper business dates back to 1951 as a copyboy at the now defunct Arkansas Gazette where he later became a sportswriter and an assistant state editor. In 1982, he joined The Washington Times, four months after the paper began, as chief political correspondent. He became assistant managing editor in 1983, managing editor in 1985, and editor-in-chief in 1992. He retired in January 2008 and became editor-in-chief-emeritus. Mr. Pruden is known for his coverage of President Ronald Reagan. In 1991, he won the H.L. Mencken Prize for excellence in writing and commentary. Mr. Pruden writes a twice-weekly column on politics and national affairs for The Times.

Articles by Wesley Pruden

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Massachusetts Democrat (Associated Press) **FILE**

Playing percentages of the noble blood

There's no law saying how much Indian blood a body has to have to have to qualify as an Indian, but it's surely more than Elizabeth Warren's blood-o-meter registers. Donald Trump is clearly entitled to keep his checkbook in his pocket. He doesn't want to be an Indian giver, but he doesn't want to be a sucker for a pretty face, either. Published October 15, 2018

Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Lurid tales of blood from the crypt

Certain female journalists, dispensing with the ancient newsroom tradition of keeping keep cool when the going gets hot, had confessed that listening to Christine Blasey Ford made them want to cry. But not everyone, and not anymore. Published October 11, 2018

Senate Judiciary Committee Ranking Member Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., speaks to the media, accompanied by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., about the FBI report on sexual misconduct allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, on Capitol Hill, Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) ** FILE **

Singing only sad songs is no fun

Politics is fun, but not when you're losing. Then it hurts. When Adlai Stevenson lost his first race for president in 1952, he said it "hurts too much to laugh and I'm too old to cry." But it didn't hurt too much to not try again (and lose again). Published October 8, 2018

Judge Brett Kavanaugh. (Associated Press)

The long, long trail of trashed reputations

Great reputations are difficult to make, requiring time and dedication, and they are reputations easily destroyed, sometimes in a moment of careless passion, sometimes with a word not spoken. Published October 4, 2018

Christine Blasey Ford accused now-Supreme Court Justice Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her 36 years ago, but her story could not be corroborated. (Associated Press/File)

Sen. Schumer, 'have you no decency?'

Nothing recedes like success, and Christine Blasey Ford's accusations that Brett Kavanaugh was a serial sexual monster when they were teenagers, taken by Democrats as a Gospel account a week ago, have begun to fray at the edges. Published October 1, 2018

Sen. Dianne Feinstein. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Whatever happened to the old Dianne Feinstein?

Dianne Feinstein is not exactly the Wicked Witch of the West, though she is from the Left Coast and does a convincing imitation of Cruella de Vil, who tormented all those innocent puppies in Walt Disney's "101 Dalmatians." Alas, this is real life. Published September 27, 2018

Sen. Mazie Hirono. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A puff or two of smoke, but no fire

Women are entitled to change their minds. We all learn that early in life. Some of us would be here with a different father if a certain woman hadn't changed her mind (and good for her, I say). But some women, bless their hearts, abuse the female privilege. Published September 24, 2018

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Kavanaugh farce descends into tragedy

Ruth Bader Ginsburg denounced what "a highly partisan show" the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings had become when she described to law students at George Washington University a fortnight ago how such confirmation hearings used to be. Published September 20, 2018

Sen. Chuck Grassley. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The march of the September Surprises

Everyone knew a September Surprise was coming. Supreme Court appointments are a big deal. The Republicans are determined to get an "originalist" justice, one who honors the Constitution as written by the Founding Fathers, subject to amendments duly adopted. Published September 17, 2018

Kathy Griffin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

When debate turns to visions of murder

Bill Clinton, the beau ideal of Democratic women, once promised to make abortion "safe, legal and rare," which sounded pretty good to the ladies of the left. Except, of course, for the little ladies waiting their turn to slide down a birth canal. Published September 13, 2018

Colin Kaepernick. (Associated Press)

Taking a knee looks like the Democratic strategy

The Democrats appear to have given up on their long-anticipated "blue wave." This was the wave of sound and fury that was to sweep out everything before it. The wave, alas, is still on the far horizon, if that's not merely a mirage of whine and wail, and the Democrats are left with only manufactured hysteria. Published September 10, 2018

Vice President Mike Pence. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Let's plot the Trump coup together

Impeachment is too slow. Assassination is too messy. A coup d'etat sounds just about right, and it sounds French besides. Come, let us plot together. Published September 6, 2018

Hank Williams. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Showbiz funerals and high-church grief

Monetizing friendships and politicizing grief are not easy to do. You never want to be seen actually doing it. The hand must stay behind the curtain. But Washington and Hollywood, where successfully faking sincerity is high art, are forever tempted to try. Letting all that free ink and air time go to waste, like a crisis in Chicago, is, well, a waste. Published September 3, 2018

President Barack Obama. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The monkey with a well-done nothingburger

Conversations are the mine fields in America's politics. A candidate, even a well-meaning Democrat, opens his mouth at his own risk. He might think he knows words and what they mean, but what he doesn't know is that everyone gets to play Humpty-Dumpty with Alice in Wonderland. Published August 30, 2018

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto. (Associated Press)

An unexpected rose amidst the thorns

Donald Trump is unfair to his critics. They can't keep a negative narrative going no matter how hard they try because he keeps interrupting with unexpected good news. What's a respectable body to do? Published August 27, 2018

Rep. Maxine Waters. (Associated Press)

The Democratic pursuit of the unholy dream

The Democrats and their mainstream media allies promise to make the impeachment of Donald Trump the first order of business if they take back the House of Representatives in November. If they win the votes to do it, they'll be entitled, whether it's a shameful enterprise or not. Published August 23, 2018

Xi Jinping. (Associated Press)

Another attempt, another failure of suppression of faith

President Xi Jinping of China is about to learn what despots before learned, to their consternation, puzzlement and grief. He has set out, as Mao Zedong did before him, to crush and squeeze the Christians in China until he has eliminated them all. Published August 20, 2018

Minnesota state Rep. Ilhan Omar (Associated Press)

Giddy with moral victories and intramural success

Democrats have an impressive winning streak leading up to the November midterm congressional elections. Candidate after candidate has run up big numbers, leaving the party giddy with expectations of miracles to come. Published August 16, 2018

Angela Merkel

The unlikely political feats of late summer

Jews are smart. Everyone knows that. We just didn't know how smart. Gen. Gholam Reza Jalili, the brilliant military mind of Iran, is a man not easily fooled. He has figured out that drought in Iran is the work of those wily Jews, identifying the problem as the International Jewish Cloud Conspiracy. Published August 13, 2018

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

A wake-up call for the sleeping beauties

The midterm congressional election campaigns are about to be upon us. Labor Day is when campaigns get serious, and this year we still don't have a name for the Nov. 6 elections. Published August 9, 2018