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Illustration on China's dam building frenzy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China’s dam frenzy

China’s hyperactive dam building is a reminder that, while international attention remains on its recidivist activities in the South China Sea’s disputed waters, it is also focusing quietly on other waters — of rivers that originate in Chinese-controlled territory like Tibet and flow to other countries. No country in history has built more dams than China. In fact, China today boasts more dams than the rest of the world combined.

Illustration on lowering veterans' suicide rates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lowering the suicide rates of those who serve

President Donald Trump last week signed an executive order which seeks to lower suicides rates among our nation’s veterans. The order, which would take effect in March, expands mental health services for transitioning veterans upon their return home to civilian life. Mr. Trump hailed the order as a “historic step to make sure that our incredible veterans are taken care of in a proper manner.”

FISA: A Rubber Stamp to Break the Law Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Institutionalizing Watergate

The “third rate burglary” of the Democratic National Committee’s offices at the Watergate hotel in 1972 was meant to spy on the Democratic presidential campaign. Now we’re beginning to understand how a Democratic administration pried into the 2016 Republican Campaign with the assistance of the CIA, the FBI, and the Department of Justice. The Democratic Party’s media wing tries to cover the spying and pretends that it uncovered dirt.

A supporter of President Donald Trump challenges police officers and a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program during a rally outside the office of California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon) ** FILE **

Nightmare for Dreamers

DACA, “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals,” is an Obama pen-and-phone program, not one created by legislation. It was simply a policy announced by President Obama on June 15, 2013. The date was chosen because it was the 30th anniversary of Plyler v. Doe, a Supreme Court decision that barred public schools from charging illegal immigrant children tuition.

A pair of postal workers shovel the lot at the Plainville, Mass., Post Office Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018. The post office was open for business as usual.  (Mark Stockwell/The Sun Chronicle via AP)

Another view of the U.S. Postal Service

Along with political coverage and analysis generally regarded as top-flight, The Washington Times apparently also possesses a good sense of humor.

Sen. Charles E. Schumer. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Democrats decree death in the swamp for the Dreamers

- The Washington Times

Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi and their Democratic followers laid a careful trap for their Republican tormentors, and then fell in it. The Republican leadership can keep them from climbing out if they’re smart and show a little courage.

In this Jan. 10, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump listens during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Fearful Dems preemptively strike State of Union

- The Washington Times

Democrats must be shaking in their Birkenstocks. How else to explain their many, many and many more preemptive strikes at President Donald Trump’s State of the Union speech — a speech that doesn’t even take place until Jan. 30?

Illustration on an alliance between Irael and Saudi Arabia by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A secret Middle East alliance

A Swiss newspaper, Basler Zeitung, reported recently that a secret alliance between Israel and Saudi Arabia aimed at restraining Iran’s imperial desire for a land mass between Tehran and the Mediterranean was moving into a new phase. While there aren’t formal diplomatic ties between the two countries, military cooperation does exist. In fact, the Saudi government sent a military delegation to Jerusalem several months ago to discuss Iran’s role as a destabilizing force in the region.

Perpetual Motion Money Machine Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing in a scorching market

Stocks have just accomplished a Houdini — scorching to record highs while escaping volatility. The S&P 500, which accounts for 80 percent of the value of publicly traded U.S. companies, just scored an unprecedented 14 consecutive monthly gains.

Illustration on supporting the Iranian uprising by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How to support the Iranian uprising

The current Iranian “man in the street” uprising provides the United States with a unique opportunity to achieve what should be one of our core vital national security objectives: the removal of the Iranian theocracy from power. Why? Because the Iranian theocracy has been at war with the United States for over 38 years. They have caused the death of thousands of Americans, both civilian and military.

Chart to accompany Emily Baker article of Jan. 16, 2018.

Small businesses and government contracts

With the sixth round of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) negotiations set to begin in Canada later this month, news reports claim that Canadian negotiators are increasingly worried that the U.S. may unilaterally quit the agreement — something that President Trump can do with the stroke of a pen.

A model has his hair cut as he waits backstage prior to the start of Versace men's Fall-Winter 2018-19 collection, that was presented in Milan, Italy, Saturday, Jan.13, 2018. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

The cosmetology cops

Few things could be more American than volunteering to help others. So it’s a shame when our altruism is thwarted by another, far more lamentable American trait: big government.

Influence of Tax Rates Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why taxes matter after all

One premise of modern-day “progressives,” is that taxes don’t have much influence on how much and when people invest, how much they work and save, or where they live. Just Google “Taxes don’t matter” and you will find scores of academic studies and news stories assuring us that taxes have little or no effect on behavior.

Related Articles

FILE - A June 25, 1999, file photo shows an enlargement of the U.S. Postal Service's stamp depicting Rosie the Riveter, in South Portland, Maine. A group wants to preserve a portion of the old Willow Run bomber plant and house a museum there dedicated to aviation and the countless Rosies across the country. Save the Bomber Plant officials have until Thursday, May 1, to raise the remainder of the $8 million needed to save the plant from demolition. (AP Photo/Joan Seidel, File)

When women were stronger

Researchers at the Max Planck Odense Center at the University of Southern Denmark have just discovered what everybody already knew (which is the most persuasive kind of research): Women are stronger than men, and they live longer, too.

President Donald Trump arrives for a news conference with Norway Prime Minister Erna Solberg in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

'Support the most viable conservative'

After a year, conservatives should now have few doubts about President Trump. They should have even fewer that they will have a better viable alternative in 2020.

Standing up to the lynch mob

We will soon celebrate the first anniversary of the Trump presidency. I am a moderate conservative and Donald Trump was not my first choice as a Republican nominee. But if the Republicans had nominated the Devil, I'd have voted the Hell ticket as an alternative to Hillary Clinton. That said, I've warmed to the president since last January.

US Constitution (illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington TImes)

Working below the radar, unleashing surveillance

Hidden beneath the controversy stirred up last week by the publication of a book called "Fire and Fury," a highly critical insider's view of the Trump White House that the president has not only denounced on national television but also tried to prevent from being published and distributed, are the efforts of the Trump administration and congressional leadership to bypass the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution.

Illustration on Trump as poetic muse by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Poets and politics

Last February, after The New York Times announced a Donald Trump Poetry Contest, columnist Nicholas Kristof reported that 2,000 entries had been submitted. "I sought out pro-Trump poems," he said, "but poets seem to be disproportionately aghast at his presidency."

Illustration on keeping surveillance within constitutional bounds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Keeping surveillance in line with the Constitution

- The Washington Times

In the next few days, Congress will vote on whether and how to renew a controversial part of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act that has resulted in the collection of thousands of Americans' private communications -- without probable cause or a warrant.

Illustration on problems with continued U.S. support of the Palestinians by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The faded Palestinian issue

President Trump set off another Twitter firestorm last week when he hinted that he may be considering cutting off hundreds of millions of dollars in annual U.S. aid to the Palestinians. Mr. Trump was angered over Palestinian unwillingness to engage in peace talks with Israel after the Trump administration announced the move of the U.S. Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with lawmakers on immigration policy in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, in Washington. From left, Trump, Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Dear White House: It's not a 'DACA Deal' it's a 'Wall Deal'

- The Washington Times

Words matter. And how the public perceives things is often dictated by the words used to describe those things. No one knows this lesson better than President Donald Trump who has effectively used labels and names to promote his own ideas and efforts while tearing down and destroying his opponents.

FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2012, file photo, Ann Coulter gestures while speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington. Delta pushed back at Coulter after the conservative commentator berated the carrier on Twitter over a changed seat assignment for a July 15, 2017, flight from New York to West Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Coulter on Trump's immigration meeting: Confirms worst things in Wolff's book

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump's "watch how the sausage gets made" meeting with congressional leaders on pending immigration issues was not pleasant television programming for one of his most ardent and vocal supporters. Columnist and author Ann Coulter called it "the worst day of his presidency" while appearing on my daily radio show on WMAL in Washington DC:

In this file photo, demonstrators urging the Democratic Party to protect the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Act (DACA) rally outside the office of California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein in Los Angeles Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

DACA stays, as judge hands Obama feather for his cap

- The Washington Times

A federal judge in California ruled that President Donald Trump's move to end the Barack Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program was misguided and therefore must remain in place. And Obama, whose pet DACA program has been a thorn in the side of control border types for years, just won another feather for his cap.

Meryl Streep, left, and Ai-jen Poo arrive at the 75th annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

Golden Globes: Another round of 'Hollywood fakery'

Most people did not watch the Golden Globes, one of the many parties in which the entertainment industry pats itself on the back and gives its friends awards. But, to paraphrase a few on Twitter, it was at least nice for Hollywood take a break from raping each other for at least one evening.

Trump should bring up Beirut now

Iranian protests give President Donald Trump a chance to address with the ayatollahs the great casualties inflicted in Beirut in 1983 against Americans and the French. From Aug. 25, 1982, to Feb. 26, 1984, U.S. Marines served in Lebanon under the most difficult rules of engagement, restrictions on fire support and political posturing. On Aug. 25, 1982, about 800 Marines of the 32d Marine Amphibious Unit (MAU) landed in Beirut as part of a multinational peacekeeping force and oversaw the evacuation of PLO guerrillas under Israeli siege. The force included 400 French and 800 Italian soldiers. On Sept. 10 of that year, after the evacuation of the PLO was complete, 32d MAU was withdrawn. Then, in the wake of the assassination of President-elect Bashir Gemayel, the 32d MAU returned to Beirut and remained until Oct. 30, when it was relieved by the 24th MAU.

Climate scientists blowing hot air

Why do we keep listening to so-called "experts" who continue to change their story on climate change? As an engineer, I have found that if a set of data does not create to the results we observe, then there is a problem with the method of evaluation. The climate scientists have many years of data that they have used to predict climate-change results that have not been anywhere close to what has actually occurred.