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Illustration on high tech's deleterious effects on commerce by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Big Tech chameleon

Twenty years ago, no one had heard of either Facebook or Google, neither of which existed yet. For that matter, no one knew much about social media or search engines in general.

"I'm not a racist. I'm the least racist person you will ever interview," said President Trump told reporters as he met with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, California Republican (left). The furor grew out of an immigration discussion at the White House on Thursday where Mr. Trump allegedly made vulgar comments. (Associated Press)

‘Trump’s a racist’ — Marcia, Marcia, Marcia

- The Washington Times

There comes a point when calling a spade a spatula becomes a bit worn and wearying and the public starts to catch on and actually notice and say, hey, that’s a spatula, not a spade. In other words: People start to doubt the message is actually true.

Taxpayer Money Lost in  Space Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The hidden fees of SpaceX

No one likes hidden fees. From unauthorized phone charges to home closing costs and prepaid card levies, they take a toll on low and middle-income Americans. To mitigate consumer outrage, members of Congress often demagogue unknown expenditures like ATM and airline baggage fees in committee hearings; costs which usually do not amount to more than a few dollars.

Uncle Sam Watching You Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The undoing of limited government

Late last week, Rep. Devin Nunes, California Republican, chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, repeated his public observations that members of the intelligence community — particularly the CIA, the NSA and the intelligence division of the FBI — are not trustworthy with the nation’s intelligence secrets. Because he has a security clearance at the “top secret” level and knows how others who have access to secrets have used and abused them, his allegations are extraordinary.

Illustration on China's dam building frenzy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China’s dam frenzy

China’s hyperactive dam building is a reminder that, while international attention remains on its recidivist activities in the South China Sea’s disputed waters, it is also focusing quietly on other waters — of rivers that originate in Chinese-controlled territory like Tibet and flow to other countries. No country in history has built more dams than China. In fact, China today boasts more dams than the rest of the world combined.

Illustration on lowering veterans' suicide rates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lowering the suicide rates of those who serve

President Donald Trump last week signed an executive order which seeks to lower suicides rates among our nation’s veterans. The order, which would take effect in March, expands mental health services for transitioning veterans upon their return home to civilian life. Mr. Trump hailed the order as a “historic step to make sure that our incredible veterans are taken care of in a proper manner.”

FISA: A Rubber Stamp to Break the Law Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Institutionalizing Watergate

The “third rate burglary” of the Democratic National Committee’s offices at the Watergate hotel in 1972 was meant to spy on the Democratic presidential campaign. Now we’re beginning to understand how a Democratic administration pried into the 2016 Republican Campaign with the assistance of the CIA, the FBI, and the Department of Justice. The Democratic Party’s media wing tries to cover the spying and pretends that it uncovered dirt.

A supporter of President Donald Trump challenges police officers and a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program during a rally outside the office of California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon) ** FILE **

Nightmare for Dreamers

DACA, “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals,” is an Obama pen-and-phone program, not one created by legislation. It was simply a policy announced by President Obama on June 15, 2013. The date was chosen because it was the 30th anniversary of Plyler v. Doe, a Supreme Court decision that barred public schools from charging illegal immigrant children tuition.

A pair of postal workers shovel the lot at the Plainville, Mass., Post Office Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018. The post office was open for business as usual.  (Mark Stockwell/The Sun Chronicle via AP)

Another view of the U.S. Postal Service

Along with political coverage and analysis generally regarded as top-flight, The Washington Times apparently also possesses a good sense of humor.

Sen. Charles E. Schumer. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Democrats decree death in the swamp for the Dreamers

- The Washington Times

Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi and their Democratic followers laid a careful trap for their Republican tormentors, and then fell in it. The Republican leadership can keep them from climbing out if they’re smart and show a little courage.

Related Articles

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence sgreets troops in a hangar at Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan on Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017. Mandel Ngan/Pool via AP) **FILE**

Looking for help on the Afghanistan problem

The West cannot solve the problem of Afghanistan alone. The U.S. and its European allies can treat the symptoms, but they can only stave off the absolute disaster for a period of time, at the cost of much blood and treasure.

Book jacket: "Munich" by Robert Harris

A controversial agreement and the limits of its fiction

"Munich," Robert Harris' latest novel, describes the cobbling together of the 1938 Munich Agreement, by which Britain and France let Germany take over the Sudatenland region of Czechoslovakia in return for assurances of peace.

Illustration on the effects of Korean economic policy on international relations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why domestic politics matter globally

In a scenario few thought we would see again, we find ourselves anxiously observing a world leader with little more, but no less than, a catastrophically destructive military capability to threaten our allies near and far.

Illustration on the need for a strategic approach to Iran by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why U.S. policy toward Iran must focus on strategy

President Obama's abandonment of Iranians on the streets of Tehran in 2009 was not some random tactical mistake; it was strategic policy that sacrificed democracy in Iran in order to establish an economic and political partnership with the regime, eventually the Iran deal.

In this Dec. 6, 2017 photo, Rep. Luis Gutierrez D-Ill., third from left, along with other demonstrators protest outside of the U.S. Capitol in support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), and Temporary Protected Status (TPS), programs, during an rally on Capitol Hill in Washington.  House and Senate Democrats stand divided over whether to fight now or later about the fate of some 800,000 young immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally as children. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) **FILE**

White House Spox: Trump open to discussing amnesty for illegal aliens well beyond DREAMers

- The Washington Times

President Trump has indicated that he is willing to discuss some sort of solution for illegal aliens who were granted temporary legal status under President Obama's unilateral (and probably unconstitutional) DACA order. This solution should involve funding for a border wall as well as ending the visa lottery program and chain migration policies, the president has said.

President Trump faces a Jan. 12 deadline to extend waivers of broad oil and energy sanctions against that were critical to getting Iran's commitment to the Obama-era nuclear accord. (Associated Press)

Gohmert: Without wall Trump will face impeachment

- The Washington Times

President Trump's immigration policy allies are beginning to tremble in fear that an amnesty for millions of illegal aliens with no strings attached to a border wall or chain migration is making its way through congressional negotiations with the White House's tacit (or confused) approval.

Illustration on the lack of prosecution over FBI and Justice Department corruption by Lina Garsys/The Washington Times

The sad, sure demise of the 'Untouchables'

The FBI that I knew dealt in facts. We targeted criminals based on evidence and not political party or ideology. But our leadership over the past 17 years failed America by engaging in selective prosecution. The simple definition of which is that you overlook crimes committed by like-minded folks while prosecuting those who hold dissimilar views.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents serve an employment audit notice at a 7-Eleven convenience store Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018, in Los Angeles. Agents said they targeted about 100 7-Eleven stores nationwide Wednesday to open employment audits and interview workers. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

7-Eleven siege, as ICE raids for illegals

- The Washington Times

There's this 7-Eleven in Northern Virginia where scores of illegals hang, waiting for day work that may or may not come -- staring at and intimidating women who cross the parking lot. But now, thanks to federal immigration officers and the get-tough-on-borders approach of President Donald Trump, there are 98 fewer 7-Elevens across the nation this morning that are facing this same issue.

Copies of Michael Wolff's "Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House" are on display as they go on sale at a bookshop, in London, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. A trade magazine is reporting that over 1 million orders for the book have been placed in the United States alone. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

Even left-leaning PolitiFact finds 'Fire and Fury' lacking in substance, sourcing

- The Washington Times

PolitiFact, a web-based watchdog of sorts for political reporting -- and hardly an entity that can be called a cover for the conservative movement -- issued a scathing assessment of Michael Wolff's "Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House" that no doubt will go far in solidifying the administration's line that the book is nothing but claptrap and lies, through and through.

Left's rants just envy

Every day many Americans turn on the news or pick up a newspaper to see the Democrats on yet another rant against President Trump. These range from Nancy Pelosi demanding Mr. Trump be impeached, to the Democrats threatening to shut down the government if illegal aliens brought into our country as children are not given citizenship, to President Obama sitting on his high horse in another country disparaging our president.

Trump hardly the corrupt one

Silence seems to be the tactic employed by the mainstream media in reporting on the unfolding news of the corruption in the Obama Justice Department. Maybe the two esteemed defenders of truth and justice, former Washington Post start reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, could enlighten us "deplorables" about the difference between Watergate and this scandal.

Money transfer services allow Salvadorans and others under temporary protected status to send remittances, adding greatly to the gross domestic product of their home countries. (Associated Press/File)

The man who came to dinner

"A government bureau," Ronald Reagan once observed, "is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth." One current example of how government can bend language out of shape to preserve this artificial eternal life is the so-called "Temporary Protected Status" program.