Cheryl K. Chumley | Stories - Washington Times
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Cheryl K. Chumley

Cheryl K. Chumley

Cheryl Chumley is online opinion editor for The Washington Times, the author of “The Devil in DC: Winning Back the Country From the Beast in Washington” and of "Police State USA: How Orwell’s Nightmare is Becoming Our Reality," and a 2008-2009 Robert Novak journalism fellow with The Fund for American Studies. Email her at [email protected]. 

Articles by Cheryl K. Chumley

Washington Nationals hitting coach Rick Schu drinks a RedBull as he arrives for a spring training baseball workout, Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014, in VIera, Fla. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) ** FILE **

Red Bull settles class-action suit over false advertising

Red Bull has agreed to pay $13 million to put an end to a class-action lawsuit for false advertising, and now has to dole out settlement dollars to anyone who bought one of its beverages between the dates of Jan. 1, 2002, and Oct. 3, 2014. Published October 9, 2014

First lady Michelle Obama speaks at the Fashion Education Workshop, Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014, in the East Room of the White House in Washington.   (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Michelle Obama on Spanx shapewear: 'We all wear them with pride'

First lady Michelle Obama had nothing but praise for the billion dollar Spanx industry during her White House fashion forum, calling the secretly slimming material that's taken the shapewear field by storm a source of "pride" for women to wear. Published October 9, 2014

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., listens as North Carolina Republican Senate candidate Thom Tillis speaks during a meet and greet at Big Ed’s City Market in Raleigh, N.C., Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014. Paul is helping Tillis even after supporting Tillis' chief rival in the GOP primary. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

Rand Paul says student-teacher ratio 'should go to a million to one'

Sen. Rand Paul completely dismissed the idea that low student-to-teacher ratios were precursors to academic success, saying at a recent New Establishment Summit that a much higher ratio is okay by him -- even if it's a million students to one teacher. Published October 9, 2014

In this Sept. 14, 2014, file photo, a lion statue is removed from atop the Old State House on Washington Street in Boston. The Bostonian Society on Thursday Oct. 9, 2014, hopes to delicately remove a time capsule that has been sealed inside the lion's head since 1901. (AP Photo/The Boston Globe, Dina Rudick) ** FILE **

Bostonian Society to unveil time capsule contents in Old State House lion

The Bostonian Society is poised to reveal the contents of a copper box hidden in the head of a lion statue at the Old State House — contents that were placed there in 1901 and believed to be various letters, newspaper clips and political documents from the period. Published October 9, 2014

Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton waves as she leaves the Economic Club of Chicago in Chicago on Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Hillary Clinton hedges on Obamacare tax: 'I don't know what the right answer is'

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, the Democratic Party's most talked-about candidate for president in 2016, couldn't quite get the horse out of the gate when it came time to answering a question about her plans for an Obamacare tax on medical devices that was asked -- awkwardly for her -- during a medical device industry conference. Published October 9, 2014

Cynthia Willis takes aim with her Walter P-22 pistol at a firing range in White City, Ore., on Friday, March 25, 2011. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard, File) ** FILE **

Robber to open gun carrier: 'I like your gun. Give it to me.'

In what seems to be a downside of open carry laws, a gun enthusiast in Gresham, Oregon, said he was standing and chatting with cousin — with his Walther P22 pistol in full, permitted view — when a 6-foot-tall man approached and said: "I like your gun. Give it to me," KOIN Channel 6 reported. Published October 9, 2014

In this framegrab image courtesy of KSDK-TV a crowd gathers near the scene where a police officer was shot in the arm Saturday night Sept. 27, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. The officer was shot in the arm and is expected to survive, St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar said. (AP Photo/KSDK-TV)

Ferguson-area officer kills black man, 18, in gunfight

Ferguson is again on edge and community residents are rallying, after a police officer, 32, fired 17 shots at a fleeing suspect — an 18-year-old black man — ultimately killing him. Published October 9, 2014

Sarah E. Reece of Washington, D.C. with the National Gay and Lesbian Taskforce, left, and others listen as faith leaders speak at a rally at the Lutheran Church of the Reformation on Capitol Hill held by The Religious Institute to support the reproductive health, rights and justice community as the Supreme Court hears oral arguments in Affordable Care Act challenges, the Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. and Conestoga Wood Specialties Corp. v. Sebelius, which mandate that private insurance plans must cover birth control, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, March 25, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Gay rights group changes name to reflect new focus on LGBTQs

The National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, the oldest gay rights group in the United States, has changed its name in the wake of recent court wins to reflect a new mission — an expanded agenda that reaches out to the bisexual, transgender crowd beyond marriage. Published October 8, 2014

In this May 19, 2005, file photo, Sen. Kelvin Atkinson, D-Las Vegas, listens to testimony during a Government Affairs committee meeting at the Nevada State Legislature in Carson City, Nev. Atkinson says he proposed to his partner immediately after hearing that an appeals court had overturned the state's ban on same-sex marriage. (AP Photo/Nevada Appeal, Brad Horn, File)

Nevada senator proposes to gay partner during public address

A Nevada senator who was presenting remarks on the state's overturning of a gay marriage ban was so overcome with excitement apparently that he turned to his male partner of six-plus years and proposed, right on stage. Published October 8, 2014

A U.S. Naval Academy plebe, or first-year student, adjusts his new Navy-issued belt in Alumni Hall during Induction Day at the academy in Annapolis on Thursday, June 30, 2011. The plebes are instructed to wear their uniforms with pride and to make sure everything is perfect on them. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

Navy mulls ultrasonic welding of seams for lighter, stronger, cheaper uniforms

A joint project of the Navy Clothing and Textile Research Facility and a Rhode Island company could see the military branch's newest uniforms being fabricated by ultrasonic welding, rather than sewing machine thread — a high-tech development that may actually bolster U.S. manufacturing. Published October 8, 2014