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Sean Salai

Sean Salai

Sean Salai is the general assignment/culture reporter for The Washington Times. A former National desk intern and Metro clerk at The Washington Times, he also has served as a City Hall reporter at the Boca Raton News and as a special contributor at America Media. He can be reached at ssalai@washingtontimes.com.

Articles by Sean Salai

Attorney Gloria Allred speaks to the media on the guilty verdict of R. Kelly at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, Monday, Sept. 27, 2021, in New York. (AP Photo/Brittainy Newman)

Allred sues UNC arts school, alleges sexual abuse of 7 kids

Women's rights attorney Gloria Allred has filed a class-action lawsuit against the University of North Carolina School for the Arts, alleging that administrators condoned a culture of sexual abuse of children in the 1970s and 1980s. Published October 7, 2021

Karl Marx (Associated Press) ** FILE **

U.S. adults increasingly accept Marxist views, poll shows

A new survey shows that U.S. adults, especially millennials, increasingly endorse Marxist views such as the rejection of private property and traditional morality, even though they don't adopt Marxism as a label. Published October 6, 2021

In this March 3, 2021, file photo, Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., speaks at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. (Greg Nash/Pool via AP) ** FILE **

GOP congressmen join defenders of Army vaccine whistleblower

Sen. Ron Johnson and Rep. Barry Moore have joined the defenders of a senior Army flight surgeon who gave whistleblower testimony two weeks ago that side effects from mandated COVID-19 vaccines could kill pilots in midair. Published October 5, 2021

Campus of the University of Chicago, located in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois. (EQRoy / Shutterstock.com) *FILE*

University of Chicago professor satirizes abortion supporters in Telegram poetry group

A University of Chicago medievalist has formed a social media poetry group that trains writers to mock "woke politics," including abortion supporters, as part of what she calls a bid to save Western civilization through preserving the English language. "In our education, we've lost grammar, logic and rhetoric. It's not critical race theory -- it's that we've lost the tools of thought to train our imagination and memory," she said. Published October 1, 2021

In this file photo, House Democratic Caucus Chair Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., speaks to reporters after a meeting with Biden administration officials at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, June 15, 2021. Mr. Jeffries is among the sponsors of the Eliminating a Quantifiably Unjust Application of the Law, or EQUAL, Act, bipartisan legislation to reform federal sentencing for drug offenses. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)  **FILE**

Prisoners’ rights advocates welcome House overhaul of cocaine sentencing

Prisoners' rights advocates are applauding the House for passing a bill that ends the discrepancy in sentencing for crack and powder cocaine, which they say singled out Blacks for longer sentences. The bipartisan EQUAL Act, if signed into law, would eliminate inconsistent federal sentencing guidelines that have treated crack cocaine offenses with greater severity than powder cocaine offenses. Published September 29, 2021

In this Sept. 14, 2021, photo, California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)  **FILE**

Catholics hit Newsom for replacing toppled saint’s statue

Catholics are criticizing California Gov. Gavin Newsom's decision to replace the toppled statue of a saint at the state Capitol with a monument to the indigenous peoples who protesters say the missionary oppressed. Published September 28, 2021