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Sean Salai

Sean Salai

Sean Salai is the general assignment/culture reporter for The Washington Times. A former National desk intern and Metro clerk at The Washington Times, he also has served as a City Hall reporter at the Boca Raton News and as a special contributor at America Media. He can be reached at ssalai@washingtontimes.com.

Articles by Sean Salai

A journalist looks at a computer screen with webpages arranged to show Cyber Monday deals by various online retailers Monday Nov. 26, 2018, in New York. The physical rush of Black Friday and the armchair browsing of Cyber Monday are increasingly blending into one big holiday shopping event as more customers buy items online and pick them up at brick-and-mortar stores. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews) **FILE**

Cybersecurity forecast warns of Cyber Monday attacks

Businesses leaning into online sales for Black Friday and Cyber Monday this year should be on the lookout for increased cyber attacks as pandemic shoppers increasingly go online, according to a recent cybersecurity forecast. Published November 26, 2021

In this April 9, 2018, file photo, a man looks at the painting titled "Flesh and Spirit" by Jean-Michel Basquiat, in London. A Miami gallery next week will exhibit early works and auction digital files inspired by rare photographs of New York City street artist Basquiat, whose social commentary paintings on racism and power structures have risen astronomically in value since he died of a heroin overdose at age 27. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Miami gallery exhibits early works of street artist Basquiat

A Miami gallery next week will exhibit early works and auction digital files inspired by rare photographs of New York City street artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, whose social commentary paintings on racism and power structures have risen astronomically in value since he died of a heroin overdose at age 27. Published November 24, 2021

Aiden Adams, 7, of Bethesda, Maryland, has become a social media influencer with his songs, poems and books urging people to make the world a better place (Photo by Neal Adams)

7-year-old social influencer urges unity over the holidays

Aiden Adams is one of those people who can make you question what you're doing with your life: He's published six books, written three poems, crafted three songs (one of which is streaming on Spotify) and is a social media influencer. Oh, and he's 7 years old. Published November 24, 2021

Frozen turkeys sit in a refrigerated case Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2021, inside a grocery store in southeast Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Economic pressures boost Thanksgiving turkey prices by 20%

Supply chain issues, labor shortages and inflation have driven up the cost of Thanksgiving, raising the price of an 8- to 16-pound turkey by 20.2% over last year, according to government estimates. Published November 18, 2021

In this Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, file photo, women shop for toys ahead of Christmas at a Walmart in Teterboro, N.J. Just ahead of the holiday shopping season, the group World Against Toys Causing Harm, Inc. (W.A.T.C.H.) has published their list of the most dangerous toys on the market, seeking to make parents “fully informed” about child safety issues as COVID-19 supply issues limit holiday toy supplies. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)  **FILE**

Safety watchdog lists 2021’s ‘10 worst toys’

Radio Flyer Spin 'N Saucer, Snake Eyes G.I. Joe Origins Ninja Strike Sickles and Walmart's My Life As Shopping Basket are among the potentially hazardous "10 Worst Toys for 2021," according to the 48th annual report of a consumer safety watchdog. Published November 18, 2021

Grace Kern, a substitute teacher at the Greenfield Intermediate School in Greenfield, Ind. walks in the hallway Thursday, Dec. 10, 2020. Kern, a student at IUPUI in Indianapolis, is one of several college students being recruited to work as substitute teachers in schools during the pandemic. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy) **FILE**

Substitute teacher shortage increasingly closes public schools

Public schools across the country have been temporarily closing their doors and canceling classes this holiday season -- not to recognize any religious observance but to manage a shortage of substitute teachers. Published November 16, 2021